Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 - Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 17mm f2.8 pancake lens sharpness

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 17mm f2.8 pancake lens sharpness


Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 results : Real-life resolution / High ISO Noise / G VARIO 20mm lens sharpness

Panasonic G VARIO 20mm f1.7 corner crop
with Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1
 
Panasonic G VARIO 20mm f1.7 centre crop
with Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1
f1.7, 100 ISO
f1.7, 100 ISO
     
f2, 100 ISO
f2, 100 ISO
     
f2.8, 100 ISO
f2.8, 100 ISO
     
f4, 100 ISO
f4, 100 ISO
     
f5.6, 100 ISO
f5.6, 100 ISO
     
f8, 100 ISO
f8, 100 ISO


Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 results : Real-life resolution / High ISO Noise / G VARIO 20mm lens sharpness

 
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To compare real-life performance we shot the same scene with the Sony Alpha DSLR-A550 and Nikon D90 within a few moments of each other using their best quality JPEG settings, lowest base sensitivities and default processing options. Each camera was fitted with its respective kit lens (see details below) and adjusted to deliver the same vertical field of view. Each shot was taken in Aperture Priority at f8 with Auto White Balance.

The image above was taken with the Sony Alpha A550 at a sensitivity of 200 ISO and the kit lens set to 24mm f8; the original L:14 JPEG file measured 6.46MB. The crops below are taken from the areas marked by the red squares and presented at 100%.

The Sony Alpha A550 features two additional Megapixels over the D90, so the crops show a slightly smaller area, but even pixel-peepers will be hard-pushed to notice any significant difference in their actual resolved detail in our real-life tests.

In the first three rows of crops, the degree of fine detail is essentially the same, with only tiny details in the fourth row revealing any benefit in the Sony’s favour – and this is as much to do with its lens performance in this region of the frame as it is the extra pixels. That said, it’s sufficiently minimal not to influence a buying decision.

The biggest difference between the images from both cameras here is their image processing and in particular their measured white balance. Sony traditionally tends for a colder, bluer balance, whereas Nikon errs towards the warmer side. Neither is 100% accurate in this respect, so it boils down to either choosing the one you personally prefer, or adjusting the settings as desired.

To see how both cameras compare in low light across their sensitivity range, check out our Sony Alpha A550 High ISO Noise results. Alternatively if you can wait a moment longer, scroll down to the bottom of this page to see what benefits there are to shooting in RAW with the A550.

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