Olympus E-510


 

Olympus E-510 gallery

The following images were taken with the Olympus E-510 using the Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm f3.5-5.6 lens. The E-510 was set SHQ quality, Auto White Balance, Digital ESP Metering and its default Natural Picture Mode; Noise Reduction and the Noise Filter were set to their default On and Standard settings. The individual exposure mode, file sizes, shutter speeds, aperture, ISO and lens focal length are listed for each image.

The crops are taken from the original files, reproduced at 100% and saved in Adobe Photoshop CS2 as JPEGs with the default Very High quality preset, while the resized images were made in Photoshop CS2 and saved with the default High quality preset. The three crops are typically taken from far left, central and far right portions of each image.

Note: several photos below were taken in the same locations as those in our E-410 Gallery. Check the page from that review to directly compare the E-510’s output against the E-410. Note the E-410 was set to its default Vivid Picture Mode, whereas the E-510 here was set to its default Natural Picture Mode.

 

Landscape: 6.55MB, Program, 1/250, f10, ISO 100, 14-42mm at 30mm (equivalent to 60mm)

  This shot was taken with the kit lens zoomed roughly halfway through its range, working at an equivalent of 60mm.

In Program mode, the E-510 selected an aperture of f10, close to the lens’s optimum, and as you’d hope the crops reveal a great deal of fine detail.

The bright, reflective boats also haven’t posed a problem for the ESP metering system and the result is a well-balanced exposure.

     

Portrait: 5.87MB, Aperture Priority , 1/1000, f5.6, ISO 200, 14-42mm at 42mm (equivalent to 84mm)

  This portrait was taken with the 14-42mm kit lens fully zoomed-in and the aperture wide open. The 200 ISO sensitivity of wasn’t necessary for the bright conditions, but selected to illustrate a range of settings here.

The crops are certainly very sharp and detailed and again there’s no exposure problems, nor any noise to worry about.

Despite being quite close to the subject with the lens zoomed-in and aperture opened, the depth-of-field is still relatively large. For greater blurred backgrounds, you’ll need an optically longer or faster lens.

     

Indoor: 6.17MB, Program, 1/40, f4, ISO 400, 14-42mm at 14mm (equivalent to 28mm)

  For this indoor shot we increased the sensitivity to 400 ISO, but left the E-510 on Program mode and Auto White Balance.

The E-510 has done a better job judging the white balance here than our E-410 sample, but other shots taken during the same session saw the white balance vary quite considerably.

As with our E-410 sample at 400 ISO though, the crops are pretty clean and still contain plenty of fine detail.

     

Indoor: 5.89MB, Program, 1/10, f3.5, ISO 800, 14-42mm at 14mm (equivalent to 28mm)

    The interior of this bar is quite dark, so even with an increased sensitivity of 800 ISO, we were faced with a relatively slow 1/10 shutter speed. Similar conditions with the E-410 saw camera-shake creeping in, but posed no problems for the E-510 with its built-in Image Stabilisation. For more IS results, see our E-510 Anti Shake page.

The crops may show a significant increase in noise, especially in shadow areas, but there’s still a lot of detail.

     
   
     
   


Indoor: 5.72MB, Program, 1/50, f4.5, ISO 1600, 14-42mm at 14mm (equivalent to 28mm)

    As always, our final Gallery shot was taken at the camera’s highest sensitivity, which for the E-510 is 1600 ISO.

Our E-410 version of this shot required +1EV of compensation, but by recomposing slightly, the E-510 metered it perfectly without the need for intervention.

As with the E-410 though, noise and noise reduction artefacts have become quite obvious at 1600 ISO and it’s best used for smaller prints.

     
   
     
   

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