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Summary

The DJI Mavic Air 2 brings longer flight times, 48 Megapixel photos, 4k 60p video and a new controller to this mid-range model. Find out more in my preview!

Buy it now!

Check prices on the DJI Mavic Air 2 at B&H, Adorama or WEX. Alternatively get yourself a copy of my In Camera book or treat me to a coffee! Thanks!

DJI Mavic Air 2 review – preview

The Mavic Air 2 is shaking things up for DJI customers. Until now, the Mavic Air was the outlier of the range. The top of the line Mavic 2 Pro (dark grey) and the ultralight Mavic Mini (light grey) shared a lot of the same design cues while the Mavic Air, well, it looked awesome! You could even get it in Red!

Looks can be deceiving though; the Mavic Air 1 (as it shall henceforth be known) suffered from disappointing battery life and a genuinely worrying range. When I first flew it, 4K at this price point was impressive enough, but it soon became apparent that the stated 21-minutes flight time was, in practice, little more than 15 useful minutes and if you were to risk flying even a few hundred meters you risked your video signal cutting out since it used a variant of Wi-Fi.

Two years on, the Air 1 looks like poor value compared to the Mavic Mini. Sure, it has 4K, but the mini’s 2.7K is more than good enough for most purposes and the longer flight time is hugely beneficial. The Mini also has some of the cool QuickShots that the Air 1 sported, so the content creator’s ambitions can be fulfiled for less. If you’re looking for something a bit more sporty, the PowerEgg X might draw your attention, with similar pricing, 60fps 4K video and the option to land on water.

What does the Mavic Air 2 bring to the party?

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At first glance, conformity! The Air 2 is about halfway between the Mavic 2 Pro and Mavic Mini in size, weight, and shade of grey. A look at the spec sheet suggests the Air 2 is closer to its senior sibling, though, with a new half-inch image sensor capable of 48-megapixel shots (it’s a quad-bayer arrangement, so it might also be viewed as 12-megapixels, but whichever way you look at it the stand-out number for most drone customers is the 60fps after 4K. That’s 4K at 60fps, to be clear (though it drops to 30fps if you want HDR).

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Mavic in the Middle. The new Mavic Air 2 sits dead-centre in the Mavic range, size & price-wise, at least, though some of it’s features put it at the top.

Up until now, if you wanted to capture fast action for silky-smooth slow-mo, you needed to accept a dramatic cut in resolution (often jarringly processed), or step away from the Mavic series. That is no longer true, making the Mavic Air 2 arguably the better choice from the whole line, depending on your likely shooting times and subject matter (the Mavic 2 Zoom or Pro offer varying focal lengths or a 1-inch sensor respectively, so each bring something to the table). On frame-rate, though, the Air 2 wins.

The Air 2 is also very clearly defining itself as a consumer drone, by adopting DJI Fly, rather than the ‘Go 4’ app seen on other DJI drones. The app – first seen with the Mini – was seen as offering cut down features. It now seems, however, that it is more of a re-styling, adopting a cleaner look, since the Mavic Air 2 is not short of high-end functionality.

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DJI Mavic Mini in auto-exposure mode, 48 Megapixels. It might seem a little gloomy, but to be fair, it was gloomy and the detail is still stunning.
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Close-up of the same shot shows plenty of detail.

New Controller

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The new controller design marks a change for the Mavic series and puts the screen where it’s most useful.

Out with the fold-out controller which has been with the Mavic series since the start, in with a new slide-out antenna mechanism which doubles up as part of the phone grip. This puts the phone back at the top of the controller – as on Phantom, Inspire and other higher-end systems. Inside is OccuSync 2.0 which, like the Mavic 2, offers around 10km of range (in FCC-covered areas) or 6km elsewhere. In either case this technology effectively eliminates the risk of signal drop-out within a reasonable distance of the user (remember 500m is the limit in most places).

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Seen from the top, the controller has a recessed cable tidy; it’s a little fiddly to get the cable out, but it’s much better protected than on the previous Mavic controllers. Nothing dangling.

The controller also comes with the now-expected refinements that DJI bring – little bays for the unscrewable thumbsticks, a choice of Micro USB, USB-C or iPhone connector, a finger-wheel to control the gimbal tilt, and a trigger-shutter on the opposite side.

The new design might have something to do with the arrival of ADS-B, a technology being pushed hard by the FAA in the US which transmits the location of an aircraft. The idea is that, by fitting them on every aircraft (not just drones), they can more easily detect and avoid each other. For customers this is an option, in the USA at least, and will be branded as AirSense in the DJI app, and will warn you of nearby aircraft in the app and via vibration.

Vision System

Most pilots will have little to gain from ADS-B at first, but in the long run it’s likely to help with the battle against drone bans. What interests drone operators is collision sensors, and in this score the Mavic Air 2 does OK. It’ll disappoint some – there is no 360-degree system, but forward, backward and downward facing sensors.

They are not just used for collision avoidance though. Under the umbrella term ‘FocusTrack’, DJI have incorporated much of the tech introduced with the Inspire 2 to track subjects (even when they briefly disappear), fly around points of interest, or keep a subject in place while flying in another direction. For branding fans, these are ActiveTrack 3, Point of Interest 3 and Spotlight 2 respectively.

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This is about as small as you can get from someone and have FocusTrack still pull off Point of Interest (the front and back vision sensors can ‘see’ about 22 meters). Given the wide FOV that seems good though. Selection is easy if you’re close enough – if anything it’s hard to get the drone to let go of a subject (you need to ‘Stop’ the circle mode, then tap the ‘x’ which appears on your subject to get back to normal flight mode).

FocusTrack as a system does, however, come with one disappointment – it’ll drop you to 2.7K if you still want 60fps (or 30fps at 4K), presumably because of the extra work the processor is handling.

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The QuickShot function is even easier than FocusTrack; it identifies a potential subject for you with a ‘+’ and you tap to select. Despite my slight irritation that the final shot isn’t processed on the spot but later when you download to the app – something to do with any remaining battery before powering down. Notice, too, that even though some of the pop-out menus have 5 options, only 4 appear – it’s not immediately obvious that they scroll.

QuickShots, in which the drone performs a programmed action to create a dronie of one kind or another (indeed one of the flight patterns is called ‘Dronie’) are still included, making it even easier to get something shareable for the uninitiated.

8K HyperLapse

HyperLapse is DJI’s term for timelapse, which is presently offered at up to 4K but will – following a mid-May Firmware update – go up to a whopping 8K. The advantage of this is moot, save for the fact that “8K” can be added into the marketing materials (DJI won’t be unaware of the interest Autel Robotics have got for their 8K video capable Evo II, which is starting to ship).

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DJI Fly: Every feature has just enough guidance to remind you, but not too much that you lose valuable battery seconds.

Overlooking the needlessly marketing-inspired name, the Hyperlapse function is well implemented. You can still pilot the aircraft, but forward or strafing / sideways motion becomes very sluggish so the resulting shot is slow. Sounds odd, but it’s a neat and often easier alternative to pre-programming a route (also an option). You can even have the drone circle a subject automatically, and (very usefully) the drone will also do the maths for you when you specify the frames and interval and warn you if the battery will become an issue. Handy.

The Airframe

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Weighing in at 570g, the drone supports a 3,500mAh battery and can remain aloft for a theoretical 31 minutes (34 at a constant forward speed). The camera is attached to a 3-axis mechanical gimbal which can either remain horizontal or be set to tilt with the drone’s banking in ‘FPV mode’.

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It has speed – at 42mph / 68kph it’s only a shade slower than the Mavic 2, and it can climb at 4 meters a second. A better measure of stability, though, is the descent speed (descending without falling over is trickier for quadcopters). This is set at a nippy 3 m/s in normal mode or 5 m/s in Sport mode, which suggests DJI are pretty confident of their design. With a 302mm diagonal distance when opened up, they have reason to be.

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On the underbelly, as well as the vision system which helps with automatic and manual landings, is an LED light which can assist these systems in the dark, or just be used as a bit of fun.

The Camera

As mentioned, the new camera is based around a half-inch CMOS sensor with a 48-megapixel quad-bayer filter. This effectively means there are four pixels with different levels of sensitivity within each of the red, green, and blue that make up the 12-megapixel Bayer filter. The upshot is data which HDR processing can make more use of. I was prepared for this to be a marketing gimick, but it has to be said that – though DJI already stretches a lot from their smaller image sensors – this does seem to stand out.

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Caught with the Mavic Air 2’s HDR imaging mode, at 12 megapixels. These are still 4.5Mb JPEGs, so there’s a lot of data, and this is looking pretty much straight into the sun so the system has chosen to expose for that. You can tap-to-expose or use manual.

The FOV is 84-degrees, an equivalent focal length of 24mm, with an ƒ/2.8 aperture and 1m to infinity focus. ISO is 100-6400, limited to 3200 in 48-megapixel mode. There is still some noise, even in good light, as you’d expect from a sensor which is only a little larger in surface area than the Mavic Mini, but – against a natural competitor: the PowerEgg X – that really tells. The 3-axis gimbal is also clearly doing good work, so much so that, if you’re flying FPV and wack the drone into a tight turn at 40 mph, when the gimbal is forced to make a sharp movement with the airframe you’re almost surprised.

Atop possibly the best gimbal programming in the business, DJI have chosen to mention software stabilization in the QuickShots in their press materials. Since these are accelerated video, I imagine they’re saying the processing has improved, which is great, but I couldn’t detect a massive improvement. They are already so good on the other Mavics that it didn’t seem worth mentioning. (side note: The ‘arcade mode’ on the Parrot Anafi’s gimbal is better to use than DJI’s FPV mode, in my view, but for photography & videography the Mavics win.)

Alongside all the usual features (AEB, Raw, timer, and so on) is Panoramas. These too are a DJI staple, but it’s worth remembering how useful it is that the app will take control of the aircraft and shoot a series of shots and stitch them for you – up to 8192 x 4096 pixels.

It’s hard to understate how good these are, to be perfectly honest. I find my jaw-dropping as I look at these (but it’s worth remembering that I’ve been flying drones since cameras were optional).

New is ‘SmartPhoto,’ a scene recognition system which will tweak settings for landscapes, grass, snow and sunsets and Hyperlight, a blending solution for low-light. Of course, HDR is there too, blending 7 frames.

Video-wise, atop the headline 60fps, up to 240fps (8x slow) is available at 1080p. Excitingly the maximum bit rate is 120Mbps – 20 up on the Mavic 2 Pro – which makes for great quality video (and slightly fuller memory cards – 32GB will definitely not be enough if you get the Fly More kit).

Lower resolutions, like 1080p video, look good straight from the drone too. There are none of the sharp line-binning effects seen on some other systesm.

In Flight

Flying the new Mavic Air 2 is a near-perfect experience. For one thing, the battery did, in my tests, manage nearly 28 minutes of being flown hard, flicking between Sport and Normal mode and pushing the acceleration so worrying about the clock (as the Mavic Air 1 insisted) is gone.

The OccuSync 2.0 controller is also much better in the hand, and the technology much better at maintaining a connection – I didn’t lose signal once within the 500m legal range, even where there were sources of RF interference nearby. The old Air (and the current Mavic Mini) are not so well equipped. The remote also seems to last a good many more flights before requiring charging, which is a nice plus if you’re charging from the car.

The aircraft itself is beautifully put together – very similar to the Mavic 2 series in most respects, so it’s little surprise that the newer, more modern motors can manage virtually the same speed. I was taken aback at the level of wind the drone took in its stride; it’ll fly without evengiving a wind alert in gusts which would blow the Mavic Mini away.

Pricing & Availability

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As ever, customers will be able to choose between a standard set (the drone, one battery, the controller, and a simple chargerone set of spare props), and the ‘Fly More’ kit. The latter comes with a total of 3 batteries, a set of ND filters, a sequential charger, a nice case, and a more spare props.

After launch, the Mavic Air 2 will be available only in China and for pre-order elsewhere. Shipments should reach the rest of the world in mid-May because of the travel issues caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Check prices on the DJI Mavic Air 2 at B&H, Adorama or WEX. Alternatively get yourself a copy of my In Camera book or treat me to a coffee! Thanks!
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