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Sony Cyber-shot RX100 II Ken McMahon, August 2013
 
 

Sony RX100 II vs Fujifilm X20 vs Nikon COOLPIX A Noise RAW

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  Sony RX100 II results
1 Sony RX100 II Quality JPEG
2 Sony RX100 II Quality RAW
3 Sony RX100 II Noise JPEG
4 Sony RX100 II Noise RAW
5 Sony RX100 II Sample images

To compare RAW noise levels under real-life conditions, I shot this scene with the Sony RX100 II, the Fujifilm X20 and the Nikon COOLPIX A within a few moments of each other using their RAW modes and at each of their ISO sensitivity settings.

The Sony RX100 II and Fujifilm X20 were set to their maximum 28mm equivalent wide angle field of view to match the 28mm equivalent fixed lens on the Nikon COOLPIX A.

The cameras were set to Aperture Priority exposure mode with the ISO senstivity set manually.



The above shot was taken with the Sony RX100 II in Aperture priority mode. The camera was mounted on a tripod and tonal enhancement features were left on their default settings. The RX100 II RAW file measured 20.9MB and, as usual, the crops are taken from the areas marked by the red rectangle.

I processed the files from all three cameras in Adobe Camera RAW using identical settings: Sharpening at 70 / 0.5 / 30 / 10, Luminance and Colour Noise Reduction both set to zero, and the Process to 2012 with the Adobe Standard profile. These settings were chosen to reveal the differences in sensor quality and isolate them from in-camera processing. The high degree of sharpening with a small radius enhances the finest details without causing undesirable artefacts, while the zero noise reduction unveils what's really going on behind the scenes - as such the visible noise levels at higher ISOs will be much greater than you're used to seeing in many of my comparisons, but again it's an approach that's designed to show the actual detail that's being recorded before you start work on processing and cleaning it up if desired.

These RAW result pretty much bear out what we saw with the JPEGs and there are no real surprises. They also confirm what you'd expect to see based purely on the physical size of the sensors. The Nikon COOLPIX A has the lowest noise levels, followed by the Sony RX100 II and then then the Fujifilm X20. One other important difference is that COOLPIX A offers RAW shooting throughout its sensitivity range, as does the Sony RX100 II, albeit with a lower top setting of 12800 ISO (for 25600 ISO you need to switch to Multi Frame Noise Reduction mode). The Fujifilm X20, however, only goes up to 3200 ISO in RAW.

Now head over to my Sony RX100 II sample images to see some more real-life shots in a variety of conditions or check out my verdict!


Sony RX100 II RAW
 
Fujifilm X20 RAW
 
Nikon COOLPIX A RAW

100 ISO

100 ISO
100 ISO
160 ISO
160 ISO N/A
160 ISO N/A
         
200 ISO
200 ISO
200 ISO
400 ISO
400 ISO
400 ISO
800 ISO
800 ISO
800 ISO
1600 ISO
1600 ISO
1600 ISO
3200 ISO
3200 ISO
3200 ISO
6400 ISO
6400 ISO Not Available
6400 ISO
12800 ISO
12800 ISO Not Available
12800 ISO
25600 ISO Not Available
25600 ISO Not Available
25600 ISO


Sony RX100 II
results : Quality / RAW quality / Noise / RAW Noise


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