Support Cameralabs by shopping at our partner stores or donating via Paypal
 






Follow my RSS feed at Camera Labs RSS Feed
 
  Latest camera reviews

Sigma DP1 Quattro
Sony Cyber-shot W830
Nikon COOLPIX L830
Nikon D750
Canon SX400 IS
Sony Cyber-shot H400
Panasonic Lumix LX100
Canon SX60 HS
Canon ELPH 340 IXUS 265
Canon G7X
Nikon COOLPIX P530
Canon SX520 HS
Canon G1 X Mark II
Panasonic Lumix FZ1000
Panasonic TZ60 / ZS40
Sony RX100 III review
Sony A3000 review
Canon EOS 1200D T5
Sony WX350
Nikon P600
Sony Alpha A5000
Sony Cyber-shot HX400V
Panasonic Lumix GH4
Panasonic TS5 FT5
Sony Alpha A6000
Canon SX700 HS
Canon SX600 HS
Olympus TOUGH TG2
Nikon AW1
Nikon D3300
Fujifilm XT1
Olympus STYLUS 1
Sony Cyber-shot RX10
Olympus OMD EM1
Panasonic Lumix GM1
Nikon D610
Sony Alpha A7
Nikon D5300
Canon PowerShot A2500
Sony Alpha A7r
Canon ELPH 130 IXUS 140
Nikon COOLPIX P520
Nikon COOLPIX L820
Canon PowerShot S120
Panasonic Lumix GX7
Canon SX510 HS
Canon PowerShot G16
Fujifilm X20
Panasonic FZ70 / FZ72
Canon EOS 70D
Sony RX100 II
Canon ELPH 330 IXUS 255
Panasonic Lumix GF6
Fujifilm XM1
Olympus EP5
Panasonic Lumix LF1
Panasonic TZ35 / ZS25
Olympus XZ2
Sony HX300
Panasonic Lumix G6
Sony HX50V
Fujifilm X100S
Canon SX280 HS
Canon EOS SL1 / 100D
Panasonic TZ40 / ZS30
Nikon D7100
Nikon COOLPIX A
Fujifilm X-E1
Canon EOS 6D
Nikon D5200
Panasonic Lumix GH3
Canon PowerShot S110
Panasonic Lumix G5
Sony NEX-6
Panasonic Lumix FZ200
Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
Nikon COOLPIX P7700
Olympus E-PL5
Canon EOS M
Panasonic TS20 / FT20
Canon PowerShot G15
Nikon D600
Nikon COOLPIX L810
Canon PowerShot D20
Sony RX100
Panasonic Lumix LX7
Canon SX500 IS
Fujifilm HS30 EXR
Sony HX200V
Panasonic FZ60 / FZ62
Canon 520HS / 500HS
Canon 110HS / 125HS
Nikon D800
Canon EOS T4i / 650D
Canon PowerShot A3400
Panasonic ZS15 / TZ25
Olympus E-M5
Nikon D3200
Fujifilm X-Pro1
Canon PowerShot A2300
Canon SX240 / SX260
Samsung NX200
Sony Alpha SLT-A77
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Panasonic ZS20 / TZ30
Canon PowerShot G1 X
Sony NEX-7
Panasonic GX1
Olympus E-PM1
Nikon V1
Sony NEX-5N
Canon EOS T3 / 1100D
Canon EOS 600D / T3i
Nikon D7000
Canon EOS 60D
Canon EOS 550D / T2i
Canon EOS 7D

All camera reviews
 
 
   
 
  Best Buys: our top models
   
  Best Canon lens
Best Nikon lens
Best Sony lens
Best budget DSLR
Best mid-range DSLR
Best semi-pro DSLR
Best point and shoot
Best superzoom
Best camera accessories
   
 



Camera Labs Forum

Any questions, comments or a great tip to share? Join my Camera forum and let everyone know!
   
 
  DSLR Tips



 
Free Shipping on ALL Products
Sony SAL75300 75-300mm f4.5-5.6 lens review Gordon Laing, January 2007 / updated January 2008
 
 

Sony 75-300mm coverage with Sony A100

The Sony 75-300mm lens is designed to compliment the standard 18-70mm kit lens, and indeed they're often sold as a twin bundle with the A100. Since the 5mm difference where one stops and the other starts is essentially insignificant, the pair offer a wide range of 18-300mm, or an equivalent of 27-450mm, delivering wide angle to long telephoto capabilities.

To illustrate this coverage in practice we took a series of images on a tripod from exactly the same position with each lens at its shortest and longest focal lengths. Below is the coverage offered by the standard 18-70mm kit lens, which can capture wide landscapes while zooming-in beyond the 55mm maximum of most kit lenses to deliver good short telephoto capabilities.


Free Shipping on ALL Products 
Sony Alpha DSLR-A100 with DT 18-70mm
18-70mm at 18mm, f8 (27mm equivalent)
  18-70mm at 70mm, f8 (105mm equivalent)


Below are examples of the 75-300mm lens at its shortest and longest focal lengths taken from the same spot just moments later. It essentially takes over where the standard kit lens stops, taking you from short to long telephoto. The result at the 300mm focal length, equivalent to 450mm, as seen below on the right, is so tight it looks like many of the 100% crops from our standard outdoor test compositions. It's important to remember though this is the actual coverage of the entire 10 Megapixel frame, and a 100% crop would pretty much isolate only a couple of buildings.

Sony Alpha DSLR-A100 with 75-300mm
75-300mm at 75mm, f8 (113mm equivalent)
  75-300mm at 300mm, f8 (450mm equivalent)


Sony 75-300mm with Super SteadyShot

Support this site by shopping via these links

 


 
The Sony Alpha A100 features Super SteadyShot which means any lens you attach enjoys anti-shake capabilities. This is one of the big selling points of the A100 and having seen it perform well with the 18-70mm kit lens we were keen to see how effective it would be with the longer 75-300mm. Since the 75-300mm has an effective range of 113-450mm, traditional SLR technique would recommend using a shutter speed of 1/450 or higher to avoid camera-shake when fully zoomed-in. This figure of course varies with every person and on the conditions of the day, but for the example below we found we could safely handhold the 75-300mm when fully zoomed-in at a shutter speed of 1/300 and enjoy a sharp result without stabilisation. The big question is how Super SteadyShot would handle slower exposures.

Sony Alpha DSLR-A100 with 75-300mm
Super SteadyShot Off. Exposure 1/200 sec
75-300mm at 300mm, f10 (450mm equivalent)
  Super SteadyShot On. Exposure 1/200 sec.
75-300mm at 300mm, f10 (450mm equivalent)


Above are two examples of a small building taken with and without Super SteadyShot. We used a focal length of 300mm (equivalent to 450mm) from quite a distance and a shutter speed of 1/200 of a second. We've cropped 282x121 pixel sections from the original 3872x2592 images and reproduced them here at 100%. Under the day's conditions at this particular focal length we found shutter speeds below 1/300 without Super SteadyShot resulted in camera-shake - this is clear from the crop on the left, which at 1/200 is a little shaky. Switching on Super SteadyShot though eliminated any camera shake at this exposure as seen in the crop on the right.

While results will of course vary with different people and conditions, we found only a modest further reduction in shutter speed saw the camera shake return. Since we could safely handhold this particular composition without stabilisation or shake at 1/300, then the A100's claimed three and a half stops of compensation should allow the same result at 1/30 or even slightly slower. We found shake returning at exposures of 1/100 and below though, which in this particular instance equates to about 1.5 stops of compensation. We should also mention the view when fully zoomed-in was quite shaky and much harder to accurately compose than lenses with built-in stabilisation. This is one major downside of in-camera stabilisation, as you can't see the effect through the viewfinder.

Since in-camera stabilisation can also only physically shift the sensor by the same amount regardless of the lens you attach, it also becomes less effective as the focal length increases. This has always been Canon and Nikon's argument for in-lens stabilisation which can be tailored to the focal length in question. The results above certainly show the A100's anti-shake system offering lesser compensation at longer focal lengths than it does for shorter ones, but again this is a single example from one person on one particular day. It is however a subject we're examining closely and look forward to retesting the Sony A100 with other long lenses in the future to see whether its anti-shake effectiveness can maintain the 3.5 stops of compensation available at shorter focal lengths.




Support this site by checking prices below or shopping via our affiliate stores


USA readers



 
UK readers
Jessops discount voucher
All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2014 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.

/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs