Nikon D610 Ken McMahon, December 2013
 
 

Nikon D610 vs Nikon D7100 Noise JPEG

Support me by
shopping below




 
  Nikon D610 results
1 Nikon D610 vs D7100 Quality JPEG
2 Nikon D610 vs D7100 Quality RAW
3 Nikon D610 vs D7100 Noise JPEG
4 Nikon D610 vs D7100 Noise RAW
5 Nikon D610 Sample images

To compare noise levels under real-life conditions, I shot this scene with the Nikon D610 and the Nikon D7100, within a few moments of each other using their best quality JPEG settings at each of their ISO sensitivity settings.

Both cameras were fitted with their respective kit lenses. The D610 was fitted with the AF-S Nikkor 24-85mm f3.5-4.5G ED VR kit lens and the D7100 with the AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f3.5-5.6G ED VR kit lens.

Aperture priority was set on both cameras and the aperture was set to f8 on the D610 and f5.6 on the D7100, that having previously been determined to produce the best quality results. ISO sensitivity was set manually.


Normally we'd compare the 'entry level' full frame D610 against the equivalent model from Canon, the 6D. If you want to see that comparison head to my Canon 6D review, where you can see a comparison with the D600, which has the same sensor as the D610. Or if you want to see the D600 compared to the D800, take a look at my Nikon D600 vs D800 Noise page.

The above shot was taken with the Nikon D610 with the AF-S 24-85mm f3.5-5.4 kit lens. The camera was placed on a tripod and the VR was set to Off. Active D-lighting was turned off and other default settings were used; Long exposure NR was off, High ISO NR was normal and the white balance was set to Auto. Image quality was set to NEF (RAW) + JPEG Fine and JPEG compression was set to optimal quality. The lens was zoomed to approximately 27mm to provide an equivalent field of view to the 18-105mm (27-157mm) kit lens on the D7100 at its widest setting.

In Aperture priority mode with the aperture set to f8 the camera metered an exposure of 2.5 seconds at 100 ISO. The original large fine JPEG file size was 11.44MB. At its base 100 ISO setting the D7100 metered an exposure of 1.3 seconds at f5.6. As always, the red square in the image above shows the cropped area, which is shown below at 1:1.

So, how do these two sensors compare in terms of noise? Just to reiterate, what we're comparing here is two sensors with the same 24 Megapixel resolution but different physical sizes - full frame 35mm in the D610 and APS-C with no optical low-pass filter in the D7100. The first thing to note is that the D610's extended ISO range starts at 50 ISO and provides H1 and H2 positions at 12,800 and 25,600 ISO respectively. The D7100's base sensitivity setting is 100 ISO and the extension provides the H1 and H2 positions at 12,800 and 25,600 ISO respectively.

The 50 ISO crop from the D610 is pristine, there's a high level of detail and you'd have to look very hard to find any evidence of noise. One other thing worth noting is that, despite the long exposure there are no hot pixels nor evidence of long exposure noise, despite the fact that Long exposure NR was turned off by default.

The 100 ISO crops are the first chance we get to make a comparison, though, and the D7100 crop compares very favourably. I think the D610 has a marginal edge, even at this low sensitivity setting; the D7100 crop has a very slight texture in the flat colour of the wall that isn't present in the D610. By 400 ISO there's a slight gap opening up though and it's clear from these 100 percent crops that the D7100's DX sensor is producing visibly more noise than the D610's.

The gap widens a little at 800 ISO, and though the D7100 is still managing to keep the noise at impressively low levels its 800 ISO crop shows a good deal more noise than the D610's. By the 1600 ISO mark I'd say there is a one stop difference between the two models; where the D610 is still producing excellent quality images with a very low noise profile the D7100's are by comparison, locked in a losing battle with brightness and colour noise.

The D610 has strength in depth, even at 3200 ISO it's producing very usable images; it's not until you get to 6400 ISO that you begin to see the familiar 'carpet underlay' look of a processor struggling to cope with data that's as much noise as signal, but, even here, the image quality isn't bad at less than full size. The H1 and H2 positions provide 12,800 and 25,600 ISO options that don't look great, but might be useful for those must have under any circumstances shots.

This is what you'd expect, comparing these in-camera JPEGs, the bigger sensor of the D610 comes out on top at the higher end of the ISO sensitivity range. That said, the D7100 holds its own at the lower end of the scale with comparable results up to 200 ISO.

But how much of a role does processing play in keeping noise at bay in these crops? To find out, take a look at my Nikon D610 RAW noise results page to see just how much noise is present behind the scenes. Or head over to my Nikon D610 sample images to see some more real-life shots in a variety of conditions.


Nikon D610
 
Nikon D7100
50 ISO
50 ISO Not available
100 ISO
100 ISO
200 ISO
200 ISO
400 ISO
400 ISO
800 ISO
800 ISO
     
1600 ISO
1600 ISO
     
3200 ISO
3200 ISO
     
6400 ISO
6400 ISO
     
12800 ISO
12800 ISO
     
25600 ISO
25600 ISO


Nikon D610
results : Quality / RAW / Noise / RAW Noise


If you found this review useful, please support me by shopping below!

Order the Nikon D610 at Amazon USA, B&H, Adorama, Amazon UK or Amazon DE. Thanks!


 
Living Landscapes eBook
By Todd and Sarah Sisson
Price: $29.99 USD (PDF download)
More details!

Todd and Sarah Sisson are two of my favourite landscape photographers and in this superb ebook, they'll reveal the secrets behind their wonderful photos. Over 130 pages, it combines tutorials, field guides and technical advice, using the beautiful scenery of New Zealand as a backdrop. An informative and attractive ebook that's highly recommended for anyone wanting to improve their landscape photography! Well worth the price.
     
All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2014 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.

/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs