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Nikon D5200 Ken McMahon, March 2013
 
 

Nikon D5200 vs Canon EOS T4i / 650D Noise JPEG

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  Nikon D5200 results
1 Nikon D5200 Quality JPEG
2 Nikon D5200 Quality RAW
3 Nikon D5200 Noise JPEG
4 Nikon D5200 Noise RAW
5 Nikon D5200 Sample images

To compare noise levels under real-life conditions, I shot this scene with the Nikon D5200 and the Canon EOS T4i / 650D, within a few moments of each other using their best quality JPEG settings at each of their ISO sensitivity settings.

The Nikon D5200 was fitted with the AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm kit lens and the Canon EOS T4i / 650D with the E-FS 18-135mm kit lens. Both lenses were set to their maximum 18mm wide angle setting to provide an approximately equal field of view

Image stabilisation was disabled for this tripod-mounted test and all other settings were left on the defaults.



The image above was taken with the Nikon D5200 fitted with the AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm kit lens. The sensitivity was manually set to 100 ISO and the D5200 was set to Aperture priority exposure mode with the aperture set to f4. The metering selected an exposure of 1/2. Image stabilisation was disabled and the D5200 was otherwise left on its default settings - White balance and Active D-lighting on auto, Long exposure noise reduction off and High ISO NR set to Normal. The Canon EOS T4i / 650D metered an exposure of 0.3s at f4 and 100 ISO.

The D5200 gets of to a great start with a 100 ISO crop that looks clean with plenty of detail. The 200 ISO crop is a tiny bit more textured but you have to be pixel peeping at 100 percent to notice it. Likewise there's another slightly more noticeable increase in texture in the 400 ISO crop, but nothing to get too bothered about.

At 800 ISO the noise levels go up a notch and there's also a little softness entering the picture as the D5200's noise processing finds something to get to work on; so we're in slightly different territory now, where the noise and its effects are visible even to a casual observer. There's a similar rise in noise levels and still that slight softness at 1600 ISO and from there on up the noise increases in a more or less linear fashion right the way up to the 25600 maximum sensitivity.

Overall this is a great result for the new sensor in the D5200 with very low noise levels at the lower ISO settings and well managed levels of noise further up the range including a quite useable 3200 ISO setting. It's certainly very impressive for a 24 Megapixel sensor.

Compared with the 18 Megapixel sensor in the Canon EOS T4i / 650D, the D5200's noise performance is even more impressive. The Canon crops show a larger area with smaller detail due to the lower resolution sensor. At the base 100 ISO setting there's not much in it but by 400 ISO I'd say the Canon crop is looking a tiny bit more textured than the Nikon one. At 800 ISO it's looking like the D5200 crop is a little cleaner but at 1600 ISO there's no question about it - the D5200 crop is significantly less noisy than the EOS T4i / 650D. From there on, right the way up to both cameras' maximum 25600 ISO sensitivity the D5200 maintains its edge and possibly even widens the gap with crops that show fewer noisy pixels and more detail than those from the 18 Megapixel Canon EOS T4i / 650D. A truly impressive performance.

To find out how much of a role processing plays in keeping noise at bay in these crops take a look at my Nikon D5200 RAW noise results page to see just how much noise is present behind the scenes. Or head over to my Nikon D5200 sample images to see some more real-life shots in a variety of conditions.


Nikon D5200
 
Canon EOS T4i / 650D
100 ISO
100 ISO
200 ISO
200 ISO
400 ISO
400 ISO
800 ISO
800 ISO
     
1600 ISO
1600 ISO
     
3200 ISO
3200 ISO
     
6400 ISO
6400 ISO
     
12800 ISO
12800 ISO
     
25600 ISO
25600 ISO

Nikon D5200 results : Quality / RAW quality / Noise / RAW Noise


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