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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 4:50 pm 
photoj wrote:
The 10-20 is good for landscapes, interiors and usually is found stuck to my D200 for most part of the time. You see a shot I took in Monaco with the lens here: http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2852
I did consider the more expensive options of the 12-24 by Nikon or Tokina, but settled for this. The extra 2mm makes a difference and the cost as well. I don't see myself moving onto a full-frame for the next few years, so the 10-20 was a no-brainer. Only 2 complaints with it though - if you're using ND grads for landscapes, you can't employ stacking with this as it vignettes. I purchased a wide-angle holder made by Cokin just for using my grads. And secondly the lens cap is horrible - you can't remove it with the hood on, so I had to buy a pinch cap made by Nikon to replace it. Otherwise tremendous value, especially if you solely take landscapes.

Hi photoj
What do you mean by "if you're using ND grads for landscapes, you can't employ stacking"?
Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:04 pm 
Stacking is when you use another ND grad over another, so you're combining the strengths of the 2 grads.


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 Post subject: Nd Grads
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 9:28 pm 
Hi again
What are exactly ND Grads?
cheers


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 Post subject: Re: Nd Grads
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:02 pm 
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podgeorge wrote:
Hi again
What are exactly ND Grads?
cheers

Result 3 from this Google search yielded this result. :idea:

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Olympus OM-D E-M1 + M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8, Lumix 7-14mm f/4, Leica DG Summilux 15mm f/1.7 ASPH, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8.
Leica D Vario-Elmar 14mm-150mm f/3.5 - f/5.6 ASPH.
OM-D E-M5, H-PS14042E, Gitzo GT1541T, Arca-Swiss Z1 DP ball-head.
Astrophotography: TEC 140 'scope, FLI ML16803 camera, ASA DDM60 Pro mount.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 5:41 am 
and more info here.......

http://www.cokin.com/ico3-p0.html


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 Post subject: Nd Grads
PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 3:40 pm 
Hi
I have looked at Big Pixs link to the website and now understand what ND grads are and have decided that i would prefer not to use them because i am a lanscape photographer and prefer to capture nature in its element and NOT make up for what is not there, if you see what i mean!
But the only filter that i would like to u se would be a polarising filter which is an exception to me! So presumably i can use a Polarising with the Sigma? Also any recomendations of good polarising filter makes which are good and of good quality but not so expensive to rob the bank!
Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 8:37 pm 
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Well: cheap and good circular polarizers with a 77mm low-profile thread?
No way! You get what you pay for.
But in your case I'd first try the 10-20mm and decide afterwards whether you need a pol-filter, because even without you can get beautiful blue sky with such a wide-angle lens...

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 8:13 pm 
podgeorge,

I agree with Thomas - there is never a cheap route with CPLs.

A polariser is important for a landscape photographer, and then the ND grads come next up. I don't think you understand what the ND grads do - they do not alter "nature in its element". They are called Neutral Density (ND) because they do not alter the colour of the scene. Your eyes adjust for the difference in light levels between the sky and ground - your camera doesn't. What the ND grad does is to replicate what you see in "its element" for the camera. The gradient tint on these filters allow the balance of light levels in the image and provide even exposure.

In addition, landscape photographers who do not want to alter the natural scene generally refuse to use CPLs, or use it sparingly. The best solution to natural lighting is to wake up early or stay out late.

Of course you are entitled to shoot with your own style - but I think you are making a mistake in disregarding the use of ND grads when you still don't fully understand them.


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 Post subject: Filters
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 8:56 pm 
PHOTOJ,

I can see what you are saying and now and you are probably right about me not understanding properly and dismissing them. So maybe once i have had experience with my new camera when i get it i can decide then if i need them or not!

Thanks For all your help


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