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Would you use a battery grip for non professional use
Poll ended at Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:13 am
Yes 83%  83%  [ 25 ]
No 10%  10%  [ 3 ]
I'm not voting 7%  7%  [ 2 ]
Total votes : 30
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:13 am 
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I have seen that Canon do battery grips for most, if not all of their DSLR Models, as do ebay with some other brands that are compatible, at a much lower price.

The question is : Are they worth it, really?

It takes 2 batteries. I could just flip the cover open, slide the battery into my pocket, replacing it with one, which would be cheaper and less weight, more bag space. So, battery wise, for amateur use, it doesn't really win any points there.

The other purpose is the fact it is a grip, which may or may not feel more comfortable to hold, also there is a standard 2 way (half press) shutter release on there, and other control buttons incorporated within the unit.

What are your views on them?

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:59 am 
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I have a battery grip on my Minolta Maxxum 7 film camera and it is worlds apart from the handling on my 450D for both balance and in terms of portrait shooting. That said, its a bit harder for fit in the bag, but the cons are definitely outweighed by the pros in my opinion.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 2:23 am 
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The Grips should only be compatible with the particular model or range, I would have thought, as there's control buttons on there, and the battery fittings change, for example the EOS 350D is a totally different fitting to the 500D. If yours is designed for one of those cameras mentioned, then it's bound to not fit the other.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:25 am 
If u r shooting in out of no where then battery grip is must.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:01 am 
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Jatinder wrote:
If u r shooting in out of no where then battery grip is must
not neccersarily, they only hold to batteries, and spare batteries use up less space in your bag.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 8:48 am 
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I think their main use is to allow more easy photography in portrait orientation. If you do a lot of portrait, it will make things more comfortable, and may even be essential.

Although they can take two batteries, they work happily with one. The Canon ones at least also allow the use of AA batteries in a supplied caddy so you have another power source choice.

Personally for my style of photography, I didn't like the increase bulk and weight of them.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:20 am 
A battery grip is a must for my portrait work,I really don't have the same grip or comfort without it. For when I'm going out for street/landscape/cityscape/architecture photos,I take off the grip.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 12:10 pm 
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popo wrote:
Although they can take two batteries, they work happily with one. The Canon ones at least also allow the use of AA batteries in a supplied caddy so you have another power source choice.

poppo makes a good point about being able to use AA batteries.

Imagine you're out on a shoot when your battery/batteries run out. You might not be able to recharge them on location, but there maybe a shop close by where you can buy some AA batteries to finish your shooting.

I don't have a Battery Grip (yet) but it is on my wish list along with a flash and better quality lenses.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:04 pm 
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I have a Battery Grip for my D90, and my D2H has a batterygrip built in. Main advantages are:

More juice without swapping batteries

More comfortable to hold

You look more professional

Downsides:

Heavy

Takes more space

You look more professional


Note hwo I listed Professional under both pro's and con's. Sometimes you want to stay under the radar :wink:

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 4:39 pm 
It makes the camera a lot more comfortable to hold, particularly if you're using professional grade (read: heavy) lenses like the 24-70mm f/2.8 and 70-200mm f/2.8. When you have a 1.3 kg lens stuck to your camera, you will appreciate the battery grip.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:38 pm 
I'm using a pro grade body, and lens, and have never wished for a grip. Even if I would get an increase in fps from 5fps to 7fps.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:57 pm 
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Do you have large or small hands Greg?

Also, the lenses you have are, though "professional", not that heavy in comparison to the big guns? (except that 24-70)

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 7:04 pm 
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I use one with my 5DmkII, it helps balance out the camera with heavier or bigger lenses attached, it also adds protection to the camera prevents the base of the camera being bashed/chipped/scuffed.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 7:13 pm 
Quote:
Do you have large or small hands Greg?

Also, the lenses you have are, though "professional", not that heavy in comparison to the big guns? (except that 24-70)


Yeah, not small, but not big either. I suppose you could say I've got 'girlie' hands lol.

I don't have a 70-200, but I've shot events with the 24-70 before, and I always rest the weight of the lens in my left hand, so I don't really think I'd see such a difference. I don't shoot that many portrait orientated shots either so I don't think it would do me much good anyway. Besides, £270 for a grip, just doesn't seem like a worth while investment. I like less weight, not more, and if I'm only going to use it to get more fps, and a little bit better balance when I use the 24-70, then I'd rather put that money towards a new lens.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 7:20 pm 
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Ah, and that's where we differ. When I hold my D90 without grip, my pinky finger always sticks out and sort of curls under the camera base. I also have to cramp my hand a bit when I review pictures. Some extra headroom helps there.

I'd assume this is less of an issue with the D700(/D300s) since it has a bigger body already.

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