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 Post subject: Why the high ISO...
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 2:26 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 6:45 am
Posts: 36
Location: Olympia, WA.
I've seen pics and reviews of different shots with ISO settings and the highers IOS always look grainy and taken from a 30 dollar snap shot cam. Why is the ISO so important? It seems some, if not most, of the shots are best with the ISO between 100 and 400. Do the higher ISO's always look grainy and cheap?

What are some examples of where and when the higher ISO's are needed?

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 3:24 am 
Higher ISOs increase the sensor's sensitivity to light so they allow you to use faster shutter speeds but you sacrifice some image quality in noise. You would use higher ISOs for available light photography and for sports to name a few examples.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 5:23 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:08 pm
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Look at that post: www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=9586
I could have never done these shots without ISO 1600 (!).
Have a look at them: do you think they look "cheap"?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 6:22 am 
They don't look cheap if you buy a D80. *cough*
I actualy havn't trashed my D80 in a low light situation. EG A Band Gig. But am sure to soonish :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 6:36 am 
I get noise from the D80 at iso800 and above but its nothing a few minutes in lightroom can't fix.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 6:45 am 
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Sure thing, if you can shoot almost exclusively at low ISOs, you'll get great quality, but as the other folk have pointed out here sometimes you simply don't have enough light. This could apply if you're shooting in dim light, want your flash to reach further, require a very large depth of field, or need to freeze action, to name but four.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 10:33 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 6:45 am
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Location: Olympia, WA.
tombomba2 wrote:
Look at that post: www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=9586
I could have never done these shots without ISO 1600 (!).
Have a look at them: do you think they look "cheap"?


That would be the first one that does not! :P

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