Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Fri Apr 18, 2014 6:29 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 11:05 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9952
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Welcome to our Macro Photography forum!

This is the place to share your macro photography tips or ask any questions about macro photography!

To post a photo in this forum, simply make a copy, resize it to max. 1024 pixels wide, save it as a JPEG, then upload it to your own webspace.

Then take the URL (web address) for the photo including http:// and in your post on this forum, type [img]immediately%20before%20the%20URL%20and[/img] immediately afterwards. Don't use any spaces. You can then preview the posting before submitting it to make sure it's worked.

Any inappropriate images will be deleted.

The Camera Labs team.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 5:32 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:08 pm
Posts: 7896
Location: Germany
You're very welcome to show/link your photos here.
When you do, please follow these hints/tips:
1. Place your photos somewhere (like flickr, or your own website). You cannot store pictures at the Camera labs website!
2. If you just want to link to your pics, that's easy! Use the following scheme:
[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/your-name/937299495/][u]your-descriptive-text[/u][/url]
or more simple [url=link2pic][u]text[/u][/url]
3. If you want your photo to be displayed in your post with a link to the original, replace the descriptive text by the address for your thumbnail like this:
[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/your-name/937299495/][img]http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1263/937299495_d694ab84a1_m.jpg[/img][/url]
or more simple [url=link2web][img]link2thumbnail[/img][/url]

Please keep your thumbnails reasonable (max. 1024 pix on each side). Lager thumbnails will be deleted without further warning!

_________________
Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
D800+assorted lenses


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 10:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 1:29 pm
Posts: 18
Macro lens versus telephoto lens for Macro shots.

I have seen some nice macro shots from telephoto lenses. What is the difference between shooting a macro shot with either lens?

Can a macro lens be used for anything else besides macro shots? Is it much easier to shoot macro shots with the macro lens vs. a telephoto?

Thanks for any feedback!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 11:31 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 12:48 pm
Posts: 7997
Location: UK
Typically, fixed focal length macro lenses have a magnification of 1x, so the subject is the same size at the sensor. Focal lengths tend to be relatively shorter, with the longer ones getting expensive fast, but lenses have relatively big apertures. They can be used like any other normal fixed focal length lens.

Telephoto zoom macro lenses tend to have lower magnification, smaller apertures but longer focal lengths. The subject size typically wont get as big as it could with a fixed focal length one, but the longer focal length allows you to be much further away from the subject. This is particularly useful for subjects that tend to run away if you get close.

When deciding on the lens, standard considerations apply with respect to trading off focal lengths and motion blur risk, aperture settings for depth of field vs brightness vs shutter etc...

Personally I use both (300mm tele zoom and 90mm prime) depending on the situation. If I have to pick one for walkabout, then the zoom is much more versatile.

_________________
Canon DSLRs: 7D, 5D2, 1D, 600D, 450D full spectrum, 300D IR mod
Lenses: EF 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8, 135/2+SF, 28-80 V, 70-300L, 100-400L, TS-E 24/3.5L, MP-E 65, EF-S 15-85 IS
3rd party: Zeiss 2/50 makro, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300 f/2.8 OS, Celestron 1325/13
Tinies: Sony HX9V.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 11:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 4:05 am
Posts: 576
Location: Houston, Texas, USA
I don't quite understand this whole magnification thing. For example, I read all the time about how the Olympus 35mm macro lens is a "true" macro lens with 1:1 magnification while the Olympus 50mm macro lens is not a "true" macro lens because of it's 1:2 magnification. If I am standing at the same distance from a flower using the two aforementioned lenses, shouldn't the image of the flower I capture with the 50mm be naturally bigger because of the focal length of the lens? How does this magnification factor come into play? And what does this magnification thing really mean anyway?

While at that, what exactly is the definition of macro? Does it mean taking a photo of an object at a close distance? Or does it mean taking a photo of an object at any distance, as long as the object looks really big in the photo? Or something else altogether?

Sorry if the questions sound elementary. I truly am very inexperienced about photography.

_________________
Olympus E620 | 25/2.8 | 50/2 | 12-60 | 14-42 | 14-54 | 40-150 | 70-300
Olympus E-P2 | Panasonic GH2 | 20/1.7 | 14-42 | 14-140
Leica M7 | M9 | 21/4 | 35/1.4 | 50/2.5 | 50/1.5 | 70/2.5 | 90/2
Sony NEX-3 | 16/2.8| 18-55
My FlickR!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 12:48 pm
Posts: 7997
Location: UK
I wrote more about my understanding of macro here.

Short version is, while the 50mm 1:2 will typically give a bigger image at a given distance, the shorter 35m 1:1 macro will let you get closer and hence a bigger size of the subject is captured.

_________________
Canon DSLRs: 7D, 5D2, 1D, 600D, 450D full spectrum, 300D IR mod
Lenses: EF 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8, 135/2+SF, 28-80 V, 70-300L, 100-400L, TS-E 24/3.5L, MP-E 65, EF-S 15-85 IS
3rd party: Zeiss 2/50 makro, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300 f/2.8 OS, Celestron 1325/13
Tinies: Sony HX9V.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 4:05 am
Posts: 576
Location: Houston, Texas, USA
Very nice thread Popo. It gets my vote for a sticky.

Is the ability to get closer to the subject of the 35mm a function of the 1:1 magnification or something else altogether?

Thanks for the help Popo!

_________________
Olympus E620 | 25/2.8 | 50/2 | 12-60 | 14-42 | 14-54 | 40-150 | 70-300
Olympus E-P2 | Panasonic GH2 | 20/1.7 | 14-42 | 14-140
Leica M7 | M9 | 21/4 | 35/1.4 | 50/2.5 | 50/1.5 | 70/2.5 | 90/2
Sony NEX-3 | 16/2.8| 18-55
My FlickR!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 12:33 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 12:48 pm
Posts: 7997
Location: UK
Roughly speaking, the lens will be designed for an operating region. A 1:1 macro lens will give 1:1 at some point, which is related to focal length. Less magnification lenses are not designed to work so close, although in many cases you can get a similar ability using extension tubes, within the limits they impose too.

_________________
Canon DSLRs: 7D, 5D2, 1D, 600D, 450D full spectrum, 300D IR mod
Lenses: EF 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8, 135/2+SF, 28-80 V, 70-300L, 100-400L, TS-E 24/3.5L, MP-E 65, EF-S 15-85 IS
3rd party: Zeiss 2/50 makro, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300 f/2.8 OS, Celestron 1325/13
Tinies: Sony HX9V.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:58 am
Posts: 3
For best result on macro photography first Select Macro Mode this is a fairly obvious first step but I’m always surprised by how many digital camera owners haven’t explored the shooting modes that their camera has,macro mode is generally symbolized with a little flower and when selected it will tell your camera that you want to focus on a subject closer to your lens than normal (the minimum distance allowed will vary from camera to camera – consult your instruction manual to find yours). Macro mode will also usually tell your camera to choose a large aperture so that your subject is in focus but the background is not.

_________________
r4 revolution


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group