Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Tue Jul 22, 2014 7:41 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Help choosing 50mm lens
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:09 pm 
kk


Last edited by Marydoright on Sun Feb 14, 2010 9:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:49 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 4:30 pm
Posts: 9805
Location: UK
Hi Heather,

I wouldn't be so presumptuous as to recommend a lens but, if Gordon will forgive me for including an off-site link, I found the reviews at
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Revi ... views.aspx helpful in making my own choices about lenses that Camera Labs hasn't reviewed yet.

As you have a zoom which covers the 50mm you mention I am interested in your reasons for choosing this focal length. With the 1.6x multiplier of the 400D that gives a full frame equivalent of 80mm which some might argue is quite long for casual indoor work although it is a classic length for portraits.

Bob.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 12:57 am 
jj


Last edited by Marydoright on Sun Feb 14, 2010 9:35 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
 
PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 11:38 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 4:30 pm
Posts: 9805
Location: UK
Hi Heather,

Glad the link was of use. As far as the lens focal length you need is concerned it might be an idea to see what focal length you use the most when shooting with your kit lens. If you mostly use the long end of the 18-55 range then obviously 50mm would be right for you.

The only problem with choosing a lens that is slightly too long is that some pictures may be slightly cropped. If you choose a lens that is slightly too short then you can at least recover the situation with a bit of digital zooming with your image processing software, albeit at the expense of a slight loss of resolution.

With the kit lens you at least have the luxury of being able to take your time making the decision without losing any of those precious family moments.

Bob.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 2:29 pm 
ll


Last edited by Marydoright on Sun Feb 14, 2010 9:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 12:14 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9962
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Heather, blimey, you've only had a DSLR for a couple of weeks and you're already looking for more lenses! That's committmet!

Bob is absolutely right - before buying a fixed lens, try and work out what focal length you use most often on your kit lens. Also have a think about what it is you're really looking for. The faster focal ratio (smaller f number) on the 50mm will gather more light and will more easily allow you to blur the background, but if you just want to shoot in low light, you could try increasing the ISO. The 400D still looks good at 400 ISO, so it might be worth trying before splashing out...

There may alternatively be a more appropriate zoom lens for your requirements... let us know more info and we'll try and advise!

Gordon


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group