Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Tue Sep 02, 2014 8:07 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 129 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ... 9  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 9:49 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:39 pm
Posts: 601
Location: France
Great, here I go... :arrow:

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 4:24 am 
me again

so after almost 3 weeks now ive snapped 1500 photos so far

one thing that ive noticed is :
when im taking photos of whatever and there is a tree in the back ground im getting a purple haze around some of the leaves . how do i correct that?

also im LOVING when i do get "the perfect picture" but to be honest im at about a 20% satisfaction right now with my photos ( i suck not the cameras fault)
im learning to adjust everything right now im just staying in P for now till i somewhat master that then ill move to the next and so on and so on

here is a pic i took today of my goat george that just came out AMAZING i thought
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v280/ ... GP1350.jpg


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:27 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Drill, nice photo of George!

The purple fringing you're seeing is due to a combination of chromatic aberations in the lens and sensor blooming, where there's too much difference in contrast for the sensor to handle.

There's not a lot you can do about the latter, but the former is caused by lenses which aren't perfect. Before you get concerned, it affects most lenses, but some have it worse than others. It's generally worse towards the corners and at open apertures (small f numbers).

You'll see it in high contrast areas, so anywhere the subject suddenly goes from very bright to very dark. Trees and rooftops against a white overcast sky are the most common examples.

Short of buying a top of the range lens to avoid chromatic aberations, you can actually get rid of it quite effectively in programs like Photoshop. Basically you desaturate the offending area, thereby removing the unwanted colour. Photoshop allows you to be quite specific about this, only desaturating certain colours in certain areas. If people are interested, I can post a workshop in the future...

Gordon


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:46 am 
i dont have photshop and kinda broke since now im saving up for a brand new John deere tractor now hahah
DAMN MY EXPENSIVE HOBBIES!!!!!!!!!

i do have Corel Photo-Paint 7 (copy from a freind , all i know how to do on it is , brighten or darken the light levels other than that its kind of tricky

and yes any videos that will help me on my way of being a better photographer im all for it , SOOO MORE VIDEOS!!!!!!!!


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:48 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
You should be able to do it in Corel - find the saturation option - this adjusts the amount of colour, so if you turn it all the way down, it'll basically make it black and white. So just select the areas with the purple in them and turn the saturation down to make it more discreet.

I'll post a proper workshop in the Imaging section in the future!

Gordon


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:20 am 
you the man Gordon ............ YOU THE MAN!


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 9:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:39 pm
Posts: 601
Location: France
Bonjour Drill-lights,

Two tricks that might help you :!:


First trick: use image crop as an alternative to zoom

Instead of using full zoom (i.e. 200mm on your K10D), try a lower value (e.g. 100mm) with less chromatic aberration, take the picture and then crop part of the image.

The 10 M pixels give you plenty of details: so picking 6 M or even 3 M out of the 10 M image is not a problem. I gave an example with the bird :arrow: http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=3559#3559

By the way, which zoom are you using :?:


Second trick: use RAW file and Pentax Laboratory

If you shoot in RAW mode, you can process that image with the Pentax Laboratory software, bundled with the K10D. Pentax Laboratory software is pretty exhaustive and can address chromatic aberration.

Event better, if you're using a Pentax lens, let say, the 50-200mm zoom is registered in the Pentax Laboratory software, so image improvement is easier since parameters are known by the software.


Enjoy and keep discovering :!:

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 4:08 pm 
one thing about RAW is , i ALWAYS forget about it when im taking photos . i have my mind so wrapped up on trying to get everything else correct that i just forget about it

but ill try to remember next time

my farm house is getting torn down soon and we are rebuilding HOPEFULLY i can remember to shoot in raw that day


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 5:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:39 pm
Posts: 601
Location: France
Drill-lights,

To shoot in RAW, two options:
  1. Press the special RAW button on the left of the camera. This is valid for one shot only.
  2. Select the RAW on the MENU > Capture parameters > Page 2/2 > Line 1 File Format > RAW or RAW+. RAW+ give you RAW+JPEG.

Up to you to pick the most convenient for you :!:

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:40 am
Posts: 1330
Location: Scotland
Drill-lights wrote:
one thing about RAW is , i ALWAYS forget about it when im taking photos . i have my mind so wrapped up on trying to get everything else correct that i just forget about it

but ill try to remember next time

my farm house is getting torn down soon and we are rebuilding HOPEFULLY i can remember to shoot in raw that day


This to me is the primary benefit of shooting in RAW. Once you have it set you can forget about it and get on with the more important elements such as composition and lighting.

Zorro.

_________________
http://zorrofox4.deviantart.com/

Image

Various lenses, SB800 & Manfrotto 190 with 460MG head


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 10:50 pm 
One thing that seems to reduce the amount of PF is using a smaller aperture (use f/8 or f/11 rather than f/5.6 or larger). Of course, this also increases the DOF and reduces the shutter speed....

Darrin


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 3:46 pm 
This forum really helped me decide on the K10D, especially this post by rei vilo. Here are my thoughts about the camera after 3-day use which I had originally posted in Future K10D Owner.

As I get more familiar with the K10D, I will add to this post.

I'm very happy with my new camera and I don't regret going with Pentax. I can't really do a review because I'm still learning how to use the d-slr (I wasn't even using AF when I was shooting film).
I'm very impressed with the noise when shooting at 1600ISO which was something that worried me (from what I saw in some digital P+S). In the K10D, it's very soft and appealing to me.

The DA*50-135 f2.8 is a fabulous lens as well. Once you update the firmware (v.1.30), it's almost silent! It really makes a difference. I think it's pretty quick but as I've said I never really used AF before.
The images are quite crisp and it works wonders even in very dark situations. If you look in my photo gallery (I'm also learning how to use Aperture), the first 3 images were taken in a room where the shutters were closed "à l'espagnol" so there was very little natural light coming into the room.

Many reviews state that the K10D is very heavy so I suppose I was expecting a beast. Not so! Everything is relative of course. Compared to my Nikon F90x, the K10D is lightweight! ^.^ Of course when you attach the 50-135 it's much heavier but again, I was expecting much worse. I do notice though that I tend to tilt to the left so perhaps I really should consider buying a monopod for when I go outside.

I'm still in the learning process concerning the different exposure modes so it would be unfair for me to say anything about them. Overall, I've been happy with the exposure metering (especially since I've been shooting in darkish environment).


http://homepage.mac.com/cherrylicious/K10D-DAstar50-135/


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 8:13 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:39 pm
Posts: 601
Location: France
Great, I think we are going to launch a French K10D thread :)

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2007 3:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:39 pm
Posts: 601
Location: France
Please find my review of the book Pentax K10D - Magic Lantern Guide, by Peter K. Burian as well as 3 others books
at :arrow: http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=6865#6865

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 3:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:39 pm
Posts: 601
Location: France
When I reviewed the Pentax Remote Assistant (see :arrow: http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=3888#3888), I complained about the small viewfinder screen offered.

Playing again with the software, I've found how to obtain a bigger viewfinder screen: use the menu View > Separate screen display.

Image

Despite being larger, the viewfinder screen is not that big and remains too small for checking precise focusing.

One solution is to keep the directory where pictures are saved ready and to use Preview to have a closer look.

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 129 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ... 9  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group