Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Thu Apr 17, 2014 1:54 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 3:33 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:08 pm
Posts: 7896
Location: Germany
I lost two system disks in a row because I only looked after the temp of my processor but forgot to ventilate my hard disks too :(
From that time on I'm only buying computer cases where the hard disks can be mounted straight in front of a ventilation hole with a ventilator.

And don't forget this advise, when you buy an external hard disk. The smaller 2.5" seem to be pretty easy to cool (2 Watt), but a fat 500Gig 3.5" monster in a tight enclosure may get quite hot (around 12 Watt power consumption!). So watch out!

_________________
Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
D800+assorted lenses


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 9:57 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9952
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Amen to that - hard disks may naturally run at high temperatures, but they still need decent ventialation or cooling. Don't be tempted to fit two right next to each other inside a PC case! Always leave a gap between them and try to have a case fan bloswing air over them!

Gordon


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 4:55 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2007 12:58 pm
Posts: 520
Location: Málaga - Spain
I just found this thread, it's very interesting to remind these things. I happen to work as a IT professional, so if I'm allowed to add a few words of advise about this...

Desktop towers, CPU fans, heat sinks, etc, have improved greatly in recent years, allowing for more and better air circulation that ensures the proper cooling that state of the art computer systems need. Unfortunately, the fact is that the more air that circulates through the tower, the more dust it will gather, therefore my advise is (at the very least once a year) to open the tower and clean inside as thoroughly as you can, particularly the areas near where the tower, power source, graphics card and CPU fans are located. Bear in mind though that the electronic components around there are delicate, I advise to be very gentle, there are dedicated cleaning kits around, yet with a bit of care a portable vacuum cleaner (or even a big one with of those thin accesories made to clean difficult areas attached) can do the trick, it is not necessary to leave the motherboard impecable (you can do more bad than good trying that) for it is of no concern if a thin layer of dust covers it. It is crucial though to ensure than dust does not prevent air to circulate properly, particularly through the CPU and graphics card heat sinks, not only because excesive heat can damage them, but also because an unproper ventilation also causes the rest of the system to overheat (state of the art CPUs and GPUs can generate an awful lot heat), contributing, for example, to a hard disk failure.

Moreover, I strongly recomend to, once a year as well, remove the CPU heat sink and clean it well: Use a vacuum cleaner to get off all the dust you can from the heat sink, if theres's dust stuck between the sink's fins you may use a thin knife or similar to take it off (NEVER DO THIS WITH THE HEAT SINK ATTACHED). Also, with a cotton cloth, gently but thoroughly remove the thermal paste from the top of the CPU core and the bottom of the heat sink, replace the thermal paste on top of the CPU core (cover the core completely and generously, but just the core since it's the area that will generate the heat and the paste will expand through the surounding area when the heat sink is replaced on top of it anyway). This also applies to higher end graphics card if you own one. It takes five minute, thermal paste is cheap enough and you will ensure a longer life to your systems, remember, dust stuck between the fins of the heat sink means that no air circulates through them, dramaticaly degrading it's effectiveness.

One last piece of advice, all this also applies for portables, even if mobile CPUs and GPU are made to consume less power and therefore generate less heat, it is also true that their ventilation systems are less powerful (no use in attaching to a portable CPU one of those heat sinks that we find in desktop towers which look kind of like a motorbike cilinder :mrgreen:), usually the processor and it's cooling system are accessed easily enough (I own a Toshiba M40 and it's a piece of cake, just opening a small lid with a philip screwdriver). In the case of portable computer not only you'll be saving your rather expensive system from and overheat failure, but also you'll save power and therefore battery just because air circulates better when everything is nice and clean and therefore the cooling fan will not need to operate at full speed all the time.

Bye

_________________
Nikon D90 | AF-S 18-200 VR II | AF-S 35mm f/1.8 | Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 | SB-600 | Gorillapod + Manfrotto 484RC2


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 5:39 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:08 pm
Posts: 7896
Location: Germany
Very good advice, beren23.
It reminds me, that I'm also a great fan of dust filters at the air intakes. I absolute recomend to either buy a computer/case with one already built in or to attach some fly screen material over the intake.
You will be astonished how much dust collects in these filters and you will be happy, that this amount of dirt did not enter your computer. And don't forget to regularely dust the filter. It's much more convenient then opening the PC and dusting the inside!

_________________
Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
D800+assorted lenses


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 9:12 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9952
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Good tips Beren!

I also write a PC hardware column for a UK IT magazine and some of the most common problems we hear about are from overheating or poor ventilation. Overheating can also be responsible for some bizarre crashes, so if your PC starts acting strangely, follow Beren's advice and take a look inside!

One of the most annoying examples I came across was an overheating Northbridge chipset who's fan would stop spinning a few minutes after powering up - normally once you'd replaced the side of the case, assuming all was fine!

It's also tempting to pile a load of stuff on top of a PC, wedge it in a corner, or even have direct sunlight on the case. All can contribute to overheating, so watch out!

Gordon


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 31, 2007 11:22 pm
Posts: 207
Location: Northern Virginia, USA
Good tips!

I got enclosures for my 3.5" SATA drives - they mount in the 5.2" bays, have 2 small fans and 2 temperature sensors each (one for the HDD and one for the surrounding area) - and cool led displays in the front that show the 2 measured temperatures... No problems in over 3 years... But I did have to vacuum the inside of the computer once - 2 minutes into antivirus scanning the CPU would reach the maximum safe temperature... more than 15C cooler after a 5 minute cleanup.

Darrin

_________________
Nikon D40 | Nikkor 18-55 VR | Nikkor 55-200 VR | Voigtländer Ultron 40mm SL-II | Nikon Speedlight SB-400


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group