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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 8:47 pm 
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Location: lexington, kentucky
Hi guys and gals,
As I am a noob in digital photography, I also have the same level of ability in computers :) . I have read that programs can do in computers what active d-lighting does as the picture is being taken in the d-60. How important is active d-lighting? Should I take this in consideration in buying my first dslr? I am still torn between the D-60 and the D-80 , LOL! Thank you and I really do love tis site! Great people who seem to really want to help others!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 8:51 pm 
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Hi yaince2261, I have never experienced much success using any of the dynamic range optimisation features on any camera. Basically they tend to use a slightly quicker exposure to underewxpose and preserve bright areas. Then they artificially boost the dark areas to retrieve detail there, but at the cost of increased noise levels.

You can do all of this by taking an optimised exposure and adjusting the levels in a program like Photoshop.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 9:08 pm 
D-Lightning is something that i m not really sure my Nikon has (D40x) but i knw i can active it or place it on low/medium/high in my Nikon software. I dont really use that much expcept for those indoor shots that i ocasionaly do but its has some intresting effects when using the D-light outdoors. It give the images a slight tint of black or it darkens it in a way that i find really calming!

Well i dont think you should make a HUGE deal about it as its ur frist DSRL, but its quite usefull...yeah i do have Dlight in my camera now that i come to think about it

But its a very neat feature to have when you learn how to use it :D


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:58 am 
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Location: lexington, kentucky
Thank you guys. :)
I am always impressed by this sites generosity in helping others! One day soon I may even make up my mind which camera to buy
:lol:
PS: Is an optimized picture a RAW picture? I feel so dumb. :(


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 7:09 am 
Hi Yaince2261,

No, the RAW-format is not an optimized picture. It is the camera´s native format to store the pictures on the memorycard (CF, SD etc.) In the RAW-format there is more information "stored" than in all other formats. That means, if you want to postprocess such picture in say Photoshop, you have more possibilities. If you store the pictures in JPEG-format some information is gone and cannot be retrieved. Therefore they are not so big as their RAW-counterparts! When I take pictures the photos are stored in RAW en JPEG at the same time. So, for every photo taken, two pictures are on the memorycard. After reading the pictures out of the camera to the computer I save all my RAW-files to a extended harddrive until they are postprocessed. And the JPEG files are used by me solely for sharing those pictures on flickr etc. On the internet pictures do not have to be of such quality!

Kind regards,

ngc94227


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 7:46 am 
Yes, you can achieve the same effect as active d-lighting with some post-processing on the computer. Active d-lighting is basically the same as adjusting the curves in photoshop. I never use the "normal" d-lighting feature on my D80 so I wouldn't say that it is important at all, although I understand that the "active" version is a little better.

Either way, I don't think it's worth buying the D60 on that feature alone.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 4:21 am 
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Location: lexington, kentucky
Thanx again all :)
I went down to Murphy's camera here in town today before work..handled the d60 and d80. The d80 just feels soooo much more solid like Gordon and everyone else has said! The d60 felt rather small in my hands. It felt good and solid so to speak, But not like the d80.
Then I picked up the d300...lol I think I could get carried away with all this hahaha. That truly was a spectacular camera! Could a 46 year old novice learn the d300?? I think I would need classes:) Boy it felt sweet tho!
Sooo I have ruled out the d60 and think it is the d80...unless...i get really ambitious:)
Four weeks and I will know. Grandpa Bush here in the USA said He wants us to spend our rebate checks and who am I to argue :)
What do you all think? Is the d300 too much for a new user?
Really am impressed by how it feels but it has no preset vari programs. But I know there are ways around that.
Any feelings one way or the other?
Thank you all again so very , very much.
Going now to rewatch Gordon's video on the d300 :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:33 am 
Hi Yaince2261,

The D300 is indeed a remarkable camera. Perhaps the best at this moment in the 0-2000$ class. But first: what is your budget?
You need lenses and a flash etc. also! If you are reading this forum well, the conclusion is most of the time: "spend your money on lenses, not on the camera". This because the technical lifetime of a camera is much shorter (after about 18 month it´s successor is there), but for lenses it´s much longer. Do you need all those features on your camera?
Your photo´s won´t be better if you have such an expensive camera. "It is the 30 cm behind the camera that takes the photo!". Liveview is such a feature. It´s perhaps sometimes handy to have, but I (and some others) can live really without it. But I agree with you that the feel of a camera is very important. In my case, I bought two new lenses (3rd on it´s way), and the camera second-hand (D200). Before I bought, I had choosen the D80 to be the one to go for, but when I held both camera´s in my hands it was obvious. My thinking here was: "get a good camera, but not the most expensive and buy in 3-4 years the one that satisfies your needs".
So if you have plenty of money I will not stop you from buying this "monster". But if you are unsure yet if photography will be your great passion in the future, I would buy the D80 or (as in my case) a D200.
Furthermore think about buying the Canon 40D also because it´s a very good camera and has most of the features etc. the D300 has, but much cheaper. But if you buy a camera, you choose for the lens-lineup of a brand as well.

Hope this helps you.

ngc94227


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 8:43 am 
If the D300 is within budget then go for it but if it means you have to get second rate lenses and then the D80 would be better. No point getting a good body if you can't get good glass to match it.

Do you really feel that you will need the program modes? One of the reasons I chose my D80 over the K10d was the because of the vari-programs. I would have chosen the D80 anyway but apart from test shots I've never used them once.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 4:22 am 
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Thank you all for all the help:)
Again I say this forum is by far the friendliest and most helpful! Kudos to all!!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:47 pm 
Hi Yaince2161,

Before I forget. In eventually choosing between a D60 or D80 there is some other thing you should be aware of.
The D60 (and D40,D40x) don´t have a motor to autofocus some lenses. So they need a motor in the lens itself to do that. The D80 (and upward) can use both type of lenses (with and without motor). So check for AF-compatibility (AF-S and AF-I) which can autofocus on the D60.

ngc94227


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 8:12 pm 
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Hi yaince2261,

I've had a look through the various posts in this thread and as they all concern Nikon cameras I've moved the thread into the Nikon forum. I hope that's OK with you (I've left a "shadow" so everyone can find it). You should get the most knowledgeable advice in this forum.

Bob.

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OM-D E-M5, H-PS14042E, Gitzo GT1541T, Arca-Swiss Z1 DP ball-head.
Astrophotography: TEC 140 'scope, FLI ML16803 camera, ASA DDM60 Pro mount.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 8:20 pm 
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Hello yaince2261.
Lock your mind around the D80 and than go thinking about the lenses that you really need/want. That way your investment will last much longer, although the D300 is almost as easy for a beginner than the D80.
But as others said: don't skimp on the lens(es), they are more important to the image quality than the body, and they last longer...

So think about the subjects and situations you'd like to shoot (in), and tell us a little about them.
--------------
P.S.: And forget about (active) D-Lighting. You can do it all in postprocessing - and much better controlled!

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Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2008 8:53 pm 
Here is something to think about.

Nikon D80 w/18-55VR lens - $870

Nikkor 70-300VR lens - $460

Tokina 12-24mm lens - $440

Lowepro AW200 Camera Bag - $90

You could have all this for the price of the D300 body. Especially since you're not a pro photography dude I'm willing to bet that you'll get much more enjoyment and use out of a setup like this than the D300. You'd also have a huge focal range covered all the way from ultrawide to 450mm telephoto.

Best Regards
Matt


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2008 7:53 am 
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Wow, yes Dudeskis, That may be what I do! You all have been wonderful! Ty Ty TY !!!


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