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 Post subject: About Nikon Df preview
PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 9:43 am 
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Location: Cyprus
I have yo agree that Nikon misses some points for this camera, no video option no firmware upgrade and may be some more. Most of those I do not find them of importance at least for me. But as it was mention at the end of the review "A full-frame mirrorless camera in a mini F3 body with Wifi and movies? Now that's something I'd go for and I suspect I'm not alone." I strongly disagree full frame mirror less will be expensive there are so many half frame ones (APS-C and four thirds). My opinion about this is that a camera with interchangeable lenses should never be a mirror less. Photographers will need to change lenses under many circumstances and dust will sit on the sensor, since it is uncover and those cameras do not have a "real" shutter.
On the other hand this camera will set us a bit back to basics and hope that we will start again taking pictures and studying the light like before when we were using film cameras. Nowadays I have seen so many great pictures master with Photoshop or other software but those pictures are not "real" for me it's cheating myself I did not took that picture I have change it and make it look great even spending hours in font of my computer.An artist does everything by himself alone he does not ask someone else to complete his painting or to finish his singing if his voice in not good, else he is no artist at all.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:40 pm 
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Location: SE Texas
The lack of video is OK with me! While I understand video is essentially "free" in a DSLR, displacing the Mode button on other current Nikon "pro" DSLRs, for the video-record button, is quite annoying. :evil:

While I like the positions of controls of the "pro" DSLR Nikons, meaning D2-series, D3-series, D700, D200, and D300, I have enough familiarity with analog top dials to like these on the Df. The flat top and vertically-oriented shutter button should be the tactile reminder I need, in order to be cognizant I am shooting with a different camera, so I will reach for the correct control position, rather than fumble.

I am concerned that the gripping areas for the right hand/fingers/thumb might be a bit small, and combined with the lighter weight of the body, make the Df less capable of balancing a heavy lens during low-light work, when I often need my left hand to be free to hold/operate an LED/torch or Speedlight. During my personal shooting, I have less need for off-camera lighting, and can use the left hand to support the weight of the lens and camera, but part of my justification for buying a Df would its D4 sensor's low-light capability; I shoot evidentiary photos at night.

The retro appearance is OK, but I have always like the Giugiaro-designed Nikon bodies, which, I think, started with the F4. So, for me, the retro appearance is neither positive nor negative. (I do have distinctly retro FM3A bodies.) Perhaps, however, a retro body might seem, by others, as more benign, resulting in less likelihood of negative attention and reactions? The hide-in-plain-sight urban camouflage aspect might be a good thing! :)

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 10:13 am 
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For me. form follows function.

I don't like retro - I like original and modern.

When I want an old-fashioned experience, I use my film cameras like my Leica IIIb of Minolta SRTs (0r others).

When I want convenience and versatility, my Nikon DSLRs are the go, and they are very well designed, with important controls very easily accessible. To me, the Df seems to have a fair bit of "add-on" controls as opposed to a real control re-think.

The idea of a compact body with the 16Mp sensor is a good one, but it seems to have gone a slightly strange way.

I'd like to see a really compact FX DSLR body with (for example) a pancake lens, as a handy and versatile tool for many situations. Speaking of pancake lenses, I'd buy one right now if Nikon only produced one - their lenses stick out too far; with a light lens, a D800 is actually quite a handy camera (better still if it's compact).

And I agree with Gordon's perspectives on this, by the way.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 6:55 am 
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Perhaps it is a generation gap we have with the Df. I have had many years since the 70's worked with all manual film SLR's and a med. format camera. I now have had several DSLRs. We learned to shoot by using past experiance, for metering, you would check the grass for your zone 5 (18% grey) Wedding cakes +2 stops. Slide film, if in doubt, favour a little less light...so after so many years you became one with your camera. You just knew what to expect and you got pretty good.

So now we have the know it all computer stuffed inside the camera, in part, taking over for us, even telling you where to focus. All this is great perhaps yet I like to make my own assessments at times since I have been trained to do so. We live in a default mindset these days, no extra thinking needed. I realize for fast action, the modern camera cannot be beat yet being from the old school, I like tweeking my focus points to get the depth of field area just right. I know you can still do that which is good but miss the split image screen. You do not have to hold down the button half way and hope it holds or remember to have the setting right so it does not track. It is just more ackward. The video feature for me only adds more bulk to the camera since I never have used it for any assignments let alone the thought of having to learn how to edit it. The local pros I know never do video, and I never seen a pro do video at a weddding with a DSLR.

Less is more in this case. Let the mass consumers have their bells and whistles, must we load up every model?

We live in a world where everything must be loaded to sell, yet how few folks have mastered the simple. The intuitive aproach has dried up and the art that goes with it. I realize we cannot relive the past, I like the digital, and LightRoom is great, yet we tend to over process things including music and the raw edges that brought character and style seem to be perfected away.

I may just end up with the Df, it is all I wanted in the first place.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2013 5:22 pm 
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Location: Cyprus
I did a little Google search about the price of Df. Unfortunately It is very expensive and it will miss the point. Ok retro style I like some buttons are easy to use example the + - 3 EV no need to remove it from my eye in order to compensate. Or the ISO fast to do and no need to be guided through the menu and pressing many buttons. I have not try this camera in real life but it is what I saw from pictures that it must be simple and love simplicity I prefer to use manual control and not programs etc so this for me is a "real" camera not an automatic press just press of a button thing. Unfortunately as I have mention above it is expensive for what it offers since some features are missing like video recording. May be not all bother but D610 and even D800 are cheaper If this camera is at a price of about $2800 body only, £ 2850 sterling pounds in UK with the 50f1.8 lens many of those who are interested will be put off. Myself for example even I was amazed when saw images of the camera I love the silver design etc etc. But I will not spend silly money for it D610 costs half and D800 D800E can find new with less.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 5:05 am 
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Well, I handled a DF, in late November, and again yesterday. The ergonomics, particularly the grip shape and position of the shutter button, are just not workable for me. The Df's build quality, compared to my FM3A and F6 SLRs, as well as D800 and D4 cameras I handled in the store, is also a bit of a disappointment.

These are, of course, my personal feelings. Plenty of people will probably be well-served by a Df.

EDITED TO ADD: See my newer reply in this thread. I am changing my mind about the ergonomics, controls, and handling qualities.

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Last edited by RexGig on Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 6:12 am 
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Laertiscy wrote:
My opinion about this is that a camera with interchangeable lenses should never be a mirror less. Photographers will need to change lenses under many circumstances and dust will sit on the sensor, since it is uncover and those cameras do not have a "real" shutter.


I've been using interchangeable cameras for about 6 years - first Olympus SLR, now Panasonic mirrorless. I change lenses all the time, and I've never ever had an issue with dust. I have a rocket blower, but never used it. In fact, I've no idea where it is.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 11:55 pm 
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I agree with kimchi. Especially since, with modern bayonet mount lenses, there's no need to face the camera upward to attach a lens.

Heck, since I do a lot of concert photography, I routinely change lenses by feel in the dark - Mark


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 3:15 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 11:55 pm
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Location: SE Texas
I am starting to like the Df. A large local camera store has one that is available for handling, and after several visits, I have managed to find a position for my right hand that works well enough, and the position of the shutter button has become more acceptable. With the shutter speed dial locked at the 1/3-step position, in Manual Mode, using the front dial for aperture and the rear dial for shutter speed is substantially the same as with any Nikon DSLR, except that the front dial is oriented along a different axis. The exposure compensation dial's unusual position becomes irrelevant in Manual Mode.

My wife has handled the Df, and likes it. She learned to shoot in the pre-AF film days, so top dials are familiar, and she has never liked going into menus. Unfortunately for my bank account, in order to preserve domestic tranquility, if I want to get one Df, I will now have to budget for two of them!

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