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PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 4:40 am 
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hionhifi wrote:
Qadri, I was in the same situation as you and eventually ended up with a G6. I did buy the Canon 70D and lens but ultimately traded it in for a G6 because of the portability and image quality of the G6. The image quality of the G6 is close enough to APC sensors that I can let the small differences go by the way side. Not to mention the G6's many extra features.

The headphone jack isn't really an issue because the G6 has level meters that allow you to view what the mics are picking up. Plus you can use an external mic like a Zoom H1, 2, or 4n to record better sound and have headphone input. Sound wise using an external mic would be the preferred setup. For the difference in price between the GH3 and the G6 you could buy a Zoom H6 @ $399 or Zoom H4n @ $269 that would blow ANY DSLR's in camera audio processing and headphone monitoring solution out of the water.

As far as the video quality concerned I haven't been able to consistently see an appreciable difference between the two cameras. Certainly 72mbps is more than 28mbps, but what type of compression is used? All-I or IPB? All-I uses much, much larger files than IPB but from what I've read online doesn't provide any visible benefits. It's only benefit is that it's easier for an NLE (Adobe Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro, etc) to process the files. I thought I would see a difference between the two formats too but now having seen and used All-I and IPB on my 70D, I can say with confidence and experience the IPB files look just as good as the All-I files. The All-I files are just massively larger.

All this leads me to the conclusion that yes the GH3 is a wonderful tool for the professional videographer, but for those of us who don't need timecoding, multiple recording formats and some other pro tools, the G6 is more than enough. Not to mention it has focus peaking, and stop motion, a better screen and EVF than the GH3. Two of those features you'll use everyday when you interact with the camera.

Hope this helps you make a decision. Cheers.


Hello hionhifi

I read with great interest here that you actually bought the 70D but then switched it to the G6. I am actually waiting to buy the G6 with the new 14-140 kit lens which is not yet available in my country, but am now very tempted by the 70D's smooth AF in video, especially its ability to pull focus using the touch screen. On Gordon's review of both cams, it seems that the 70D executes the movement (the video in the cafe with the container of sugar cubes) more smoothly than the G6 which still appears to hunt around a little. Did you find this obvious in the G6?

For still/video quality, your observation is that while the 70D is slightly ahead, there isn't enough appreciable difference in real world terms to justify the larger size of the 70D? Portability is also important to me. Plus the 70D doesn't have in camera panorama stitching, amongst a few other things.

Is there anything that would really justify buying the 70D over the G6? Lenses? I don't have either, so no legacy issues. I am currently using the Sony e-mounts.

Thanks for your comments.


Last edited by Bjorn van Sinttruije on Mon Oct 07, 2013 9:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
Removed unnecessary quote. Please quote responsibly.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 3:24 am 
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Quote:
On Gordon's review of both cams, it seems that the 70D executes the movement (the video in the cafe with the container of sugar cubes) more smoothly than the G6 which still appears to hunt around a little.

To briefly recap what I said in the other thread, this is basically true of any Phase Detection system vs a Contrast Detection system. But be sure to read the caveats I noted in the other thread.

To continue from the thread in the Canon forum:

Quote:
As for lenses, I probably only need a zoom 14-140mm (my typo error there, Mark), a fast lens with f1.4 and a wide angle in terms of the m3 system. Any suggestions on the last 2?

Currently, there's only one native m4/3 lens with a max aperture of f1.4. That's the Pany/Leica 25mm prime. (Full disclosure: I own one. Actually, if you go back a few posts in this thread, I posted a link to a list of all my gear.)

That said, Panasonic has announced a 42.5mm f1.2 prime which is scheduled to be released next year. And there are several third party lenses (from Voigtlander and SLR Magic) with apertures as fast as f0.95 (Full disclosure: I own a Voigtlander 17mm f0.95 and ordered an SLR Magic 35mm f0.95 but it looks like this lens will not be released (was originally scheduled for February, then an "updated" version rescheduled for September), so I may end up getting a Pany 42.5 f1.2 instead.) (note that these third party lenses are completely manual -- no auto-focus, no electronic aperture control via the camera, no stabilization, etc.)

Or, if you can work with something slightly slower, there are several primes from both Panasonic and Olympus with max apertures in the f1.7-1.8 range: Oly 17mm f1.8, Pany 20mm f1.7, Oly 45mm f1.8, Oly 75mm f1.8, etc.

On the wide angle side of things, there's the Pany 7-14mm f4.0 or if you don't need that wide, but do need faster/brighter, there's Pany's 12-35mm f2.8 "X" lens. Or if you want even faster and can deal with a 12mm prime, Oly's 12mm f2.0 And by the way, Panasonic also has an 8mm f3.5 fisheye.

Mark

P.S. Also, note that the new 14-140mm is f3.5-5.6 not constant f3.5 as you (mis)typed in the other thread.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:18 pm 
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Thanks Maestro. That shows again the undesirability of shooting in low light with aperture wide open--unless you want a very shallow DoF of course--and the importance of good light.

I guess there is no harm in having a brighter lens (i.e. f/1.4 over f/1.8 ) if it does not cost much more, in case you don't have access to lights in a darker setting? Even if it's not what you do regular it gives you flexibility if needed.

By the way, (basic question) how does one shoot with a very shallow DoF in good light (where aperture setting is not wide open), if someone wishes to do that?

Regarding the 50mm portrait/interview type shot (passport style photo). The way we'd like to do speeches/q+a (solo, not conference/with audience) is that we want some headroom, some desk and background with say books on library shelves in the background (scholarly look). The background can be slightly out of focus to create some DoF but would like it to be noticed too. Good lighting would obviously help here so aperture is not wide open causing very shallow DoF (as you said). I'm thinking that a 75mm might give me a better view of the whole thing than 50mm in this case? Being that bit further way would probably get more of the surrounding in (as opposed to face and chest shot)?

Apart from where positioning of camera (closer or further to object proportionate to lens focal length) are there any other differences in terms the DoF, light etc.? - Thanks.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 3:33 am 
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Quote:
there is no harm in having a brighter lens (i.e. f/1.4 over f/1.8 ) if it does not cost much more

Key phrase, "if it does not cost much more". Physics dictates that brighter lenses always cost more. So it's just a matter of how much more and whether or not those additional funds would be better utilized elsewhere. (And the answer to that question for most video productions is usually "yes".)

Quote:
how does one shoot with a very shallow DoF in good light

ND (Neutral Density) filters, as noted a few posts back. For video, variable filters (from Heliopan or Singh-Ray) are preferred. (Note: they cost several hundred dollars.)

Quote:
I'm thinking that a 75mm might give me a better view of the whole thing than 50mm in this case? Being that bit further way would probably get more of the surrounding in (as opposed to face and chest shot)?

Apart from where positioning of camera (closer or further to object proportionate to lens focal length) are there any other differences in terms the DoF, light etc.?

First, note that everything affects everything else (which is why I would again recommend a DP whose job it would be to deal with all this stuff for you). But briefly, although, for example, a 75mm lens at 12 feet from your subject will have the same frame size as a 50mm lens at 8 feet from your subject, the perspective will be different. For video, we're essentially talking about a "dolly zoom". (see Hitchcock's Vertigo or Spielberg's Jaws for two famous examples.*)

Also note that this assumes it's possible to physically back the camera up from 8 feet to 12 feet, but that may not be the case in an office. Granted it's been decades since I was in college, but I can't recall any of my professors' offices being that big. 12 feet from wall-to-wall, sure. But there was usually a shelf in front of the wall, and the professor's chair was usually a few feet in front of that. (And even though the G6's LCD flips all the way around, shooting video with the camera up against the far wall is going to be really awkward.)

And lastly, re: "75mm might give me a better view of the whole thing than 50mm" -- that's backwards. For a wider FoV (more background), you need a wider lens, not a longer one. (Continuing with the above example, say, a 25mm lens at 4 feet.) I originally posted these pics on flickr as a "bokeh" test in another thread, but the 2nd and 3rd pics also show the difference (in the amount of background shown) with a short/wide lens (19mm) vs a longer/telephoto lens (140mm). (Technically, the same Panasonic 14-140mm lens set to two different focal lengths.)

Mark

*P.S. Googling "dolly zoom" returned this: http://petapixel.com/2012/05/03/trippy- ... n-a-beach/


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:39 pm 
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Some of the dolly zoom videos I saw got me dizzy!...Did not quite understand how that related to filming speeches though?

Ok I got the G6 and have been having quite a bit of fun taking pics of my little one and trying things out on it. I have it with the compact power zoom 14-42mm (very useful to control zoom from the lever on the camera body).

Thanks for those examples of bokeh. Very useful.

So ND filters is the only way if you have a bright lens shooting outdoor? I thought some manual settings would help. The Panasonic ND filters seem to be very reasonably priced.

I think you're right that 75mm in a University office or a front/living room of a house has too large a focal length and I guess 50mm or perhaps even 25mm is best, to get a slightly wider frame (thanks for pointing that out). There will be situations when I'm not limited by a back wall so close to the object but if there is no audience I could perhaps get away with a 25mm till when that time comes (nothing on for some months yet). Should save me money comparatively; do you have one in mind? I don't mind using an older manual one with an adapter.

What I found playing around with the G6 and 14-42mm was that I get best shallow DoF with fully zooming into the object, and the object having some distance from the background. I found that strange though as the aperture value goes up the more you zoom (whereas lower aperture is supposed to provide the most shallow DoF as you said?).

The G6 in intelligent auto mode actually has an option to increase the blurriness of the background and it works well. Did some portraits with it. Essentially I think it's just turning aperture down (and probably doing other things to control exposure if too bright outside) because the level of blurriness limits the more you zoom. I'm not why they don't just call it "increase the shallow depth of field"? It is the same thing right? And bokeh is another name for the blurriness? Sorry, just got confused finding three terms to describe to me what is the same thing.

Question I have is that if I want a shallow DoF (experimenting with the camera has got me chasing shallow DoF more than I expected!...might wear off though as first time experimenting with this coming from a video camera), how can I get that with a fast prime lens that does not zoom, as the best shallow depth I got was with zoom? (Even then, I recall it was better when zooming in close up to say a shoulders + head rather than the whole body + some clearance around the person.) So with a prime lens does not have that ability to zoom (e.g. 75mm 15 feet away or 25mm 5 feet away) can, or how, I should say, does it get a very shallow DoF?


Last edited by Qadri on Sun Oct 27, 2013 11:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:20 am 
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Quote:
Did not quite understand how that related to filming speeches though?

You mentioned using different focal lengths at different distances. I wanted to point out that this changes your perspective just like a "dolly zoom" does.

Quote:
So ND filters is the only way if you have a bright lens shooting outdoor? I thought some manual settings would help

You can compensate to a certain extent. But:

1) Shutter speed affects motion blur. So, similar to how it's better to add lights instead of changing aperture, it's better to add ND filters instead of adjusting shutter speed.

2) the G6's base ISO is 160. So, per the Sunny 16 Rule, to shoot at f2.0, you'd need six stops of compensation. So even if you did try to compensate with shutter speed (which, again, you shouldn't), you'd exceed the G6's fastest shutter speed after only four stops. i.e. you'd be overexposed by two stops. (And for the sake of completeness, just in case someone is jumping into this discussion late, we're specifically talking about achieving proper exposure without adjusting aperture because aperture also affects DoF. i.e. the goal is to achieve proper exposure outside in daylight with a large/fast aperture (for shallow DoF).)

Quote:
I could perhaps get away with a 25mm ... do you have one in mind?

No, I just picked 25mm because the math worked out. (Although, I do own a Panasonic 25mm f1.4 but I was not necessarily recommending you get one for yourself.)

Quote:
What I found playing around with the G6 and 14-42mm was that I get best shallow DoF with fully zooming into the object, and the object having some distance from the background. I found that strange though as the aperture value goes up the more you zoom (whereas lower aperture is supposed to provide the most shallow DoF as you said?).

Well, I also said, "everything affects everything else (which is why I would again recommend a DP whose job it would be to deal with all this stuff for you)".

But yes, focal length and distance to subject also affect DoF. But remember from above that focal length also affects perspective. (i.e. the wider/shorter the lens, the more background is visible.) So you generally want to pick your focal length based on how much of the background you want to see. And, as mentioned in previous posts, the focal length and the framing you want (head/shoulders, waist up, head-to-toe) will then dictate how far away you place the camera. Now, with those two factors determined, the only means you have left to control DoF is aperture.

Quote:
The G6 in intelligent auto mode actually has an option to increase the blurriness of the background and it works well. ... I'm not why they don't just call it "increase the shallow depth of field"?

I have no idea, either. You'd probably have to ask someone at Panasonic that question.

Quote:
Question I have is ... how can I get that with a fast prime lens that does not zoom, as the best shallow depth I got was with zoom?

Key word there is "fast" prime lens. Basically, see two paragraphs up. At the same focal length and distance to subject, to shorten/shallow DoF, you use a larger/faster aperture (and add ND filters if this results in overexposure). More specifically, the 14-42mm lens you're using now has a max aperture of f5.6 at 42mm. Whereas the upcoming 42.5mm f1.2 prime lens will be more than four stops faster, and therefor give you much shallower DoF (assuming, again, the same distance to subject).

Actually, even less theoretical, go back to the "bokeh test" pics I linked to on Flickr a few posts back and note how much more bokeh there is with the 20mm f1.7 prime vs the 14-140mm zoom lens at a similar 19mm focal length (but much slower f4.4 aperture).

Quote:
And bokeh is another name for the blurriness?

Basically, yes. But "bokeh" refers specifically to the blurriness of the background, as opposed to blurriness caused by the subject being out of focus, for example.

Mark


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 12:47 am 
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Ok, understand the dolly zoom now with reference to focal length/distance.

On point number 2, when you mention 6 six stops of compensation, do you mean at f/2.0 we need to get the exposure right so it has to be at f/16 (as a sunny day generally required f/16), so that's 6 stops on the aperture level (I used this: http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=h ... CDYQ9QEwAg). So to it to equivalent aperture of f/16 we need to adjust or compensate by six stops on the shutter speed? But does that not depend on where on the shutter speed you currently are? (and the shutter speed meter has many stops). Did try looking into Sunny-16 rule but it was mainly discussing how shutter speed should be "inverse" of iso so iso 200 should have shutter speed of 1/200.

I understand we are talking about photo only here as with video the general rule is two have shutter at twice the frame rate.

And base iso, does that mean 160 ISO on the G6 is without any sort of "processing" and should technically be the most "natural" picture (i.e. not exposing sensor to any artificial light)?.

On lens selection issue, I don't think having very shallow DoF will really suit speeches. I guess for things further away it will be a good idea but having some background will give it a better look. And as you were mentioning, you only have little space in focus if DoF is very shallow (I've seen stills where only part of the object is on focus).

To get me going, what do you think of the idea of getting something like a Pentax CCTV lens 25mm. I won't really need the f/1.4 unless I'm doing something in the dark outside (rare, probably more for fun). Someone suggested it to me and people are raving about them on the net and taking advantage of the possibility to use inexpensive c-mount lenses on m43 cameras. It's meant to be very sharp and good for film. Also very light/small. Or am I better off sticking to 14-42mm f.3.5 for now using good light where possible? On the other hand, can't really go wrong with trying my hand at such a (comparatively) cheap, fast manual lens that is very sharp and has a good movie look?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 1:28 am 
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Just one e.g:
Quote:
Pentax 25mm 1.4
- This lens should be a standard in everyone's kit. Barrel distortion and vignettes up to f/4. At f/5.6 this effect disappears and the entire frame is tack sharp. Great close focus distance of 12 inches. Amazing contrast, though it's a bit warm in color rendition. Tack sharp at the center. About 98% sensor coverage. Flipping sweet lens. It's tiny and looks super cute on the GH2. People will definitely ask a bunch of questions.

Review:
http://www.efixmedia.de/photography/201 ... ns-review/ (apparently does not vignette on G6 due to sensor crop, in video at least).

Comparison with Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 Pancake: http://www.efixmedia.de/photography/201 ... omparison/


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 3:37 am 
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Qadri wrote:
when you mention 6 six stops of compensation, do you mean at f/2.0 we need to get the exposure right so it has to be at f/16 (as a sunny day generally required f/16), so that's 6 stops on the aperture level (I used this: http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=h ... CDYQ9QEwAg). So to it to equivalent aperture of f/16 we need to adjust or compensate by six stops on the shutter speed?

Yup. You're getting the hang of all this!

Quote:
But does that not depend on where on the shutter speed you currently are?

Nope. As you went on to say...

Quote:
Did try looking into Sunny-16 rule but it was mainly discussing how shutter speed should be "inverse" of iso so iso 200 should have shutter speed of 1/200.

So your "starting" shutter speed is already determined by the Sunny 16 rule. i.e. it's the reciprocal of your ISO. And that (ISO) is where the following comes in...

Quote:
...base iso, does that mean 160 ISO on the G6...

Seems to me like you are now knowledgeable enough to put all the pieces together from there.

Quote:
I understand we are talking about photo only here as with video the general rule is two have shutter at twice the frame rate.

Yup. Again, you're really catching on to all this stuff! (Sidenote: but even for stills/photographs, the relation between shutter speed and motion blur isn't purely academic/theoretical. e.g. in one of my old posts, I mentioned how I made a creative/artistic decision to use a certain shutter speed because I wanted a certain look.)

Quote:
To get me going, what do you think of the idea of getting something like a Pentax CCTV lens 25mm. ... am I better off sticking to 14-42mm f.3.5 for now using good light where possible? On the other hand, can't really go wrong with trying my hand at such a (comparatively) cheap, fast manual lens that is very sharp and has a good movie look?

Again, my personal belief is that it's best to use the right tool for the job and that it's best to spend money where it will have the most impact. So I think you and your projects would be better served by buying the kit lens and some lights (and if you have funds leftover, other equipment -- extra batteries, SD cards, ND filters, ... heck, even extra lens caps can come in handy).

If your needs change and you do end up needing a 25mm f1.4 (or something in that range), then I suppose you might want to look into a C-mount lens, but whether it's a good buy or not would depend on the specifics of the situation, especially since there are other options available. (The Panasonic 20mm f1.7 you mentioned or Pany's 25mm f1.4 which is an exact match spec-wise but doesn't have any of the caveats mentioned in the review. i.e. vignetting, distortion (love how they reclassify this as "character" :-) ), full manual operation only.)

Mark


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:08 am 
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Thanks Maestro, you have given me some confidence that I will be able to get me head around this!

I was starting to give up hope!

I don't have the camera with me at moment so when I do have a look at the settings, I might come back to you with some questions, if that's okay.

Very nice pic Maestro. Get a real feel for the action. Original poster's pics don't seem to be displaying though.
---
Yes, I'd prefer to have auto focus on lenses but they are out of my budget right now due to living expenses of relocation (what I do is all voluntarily and a spare time thing done outside my university job when I get time--already falling behind with work :) ).

The Pentax is cheap and might be a good first prime lens to experiment with. Plus I can't force myself to manual focus when I see the temptation of AF, so this may be a good introduction to have a go at manual focus (whichever seems to recommend!). Users are saying they are getting no vignetting on the G6! ND filter for 27mm thread is a couple of pounds on ebay.

I'll use this when I'm fairly close to the subject and don't have the room (in offices/houses) and looking for an Oval office address type look/frame/field of view (without zoom of course) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gh76oepKFc8 (obviously I can't do as good as that--can make use of 1080p though as they haven't!).

I'm looking at lights too and next on the list might be the Olympus 45mm you mentioned earlier. Can be had for cheapest at around £220 here (can't afford it yet) and when times comes that I need to go back further from object I will try looking at this next. Forthcoming Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2 will probably be way above my budget!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 2:37 am 
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what SD card would you recommend for the G6? I will be shooting HD video at 1080p.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 3:00 am 
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The manual only specifies Class 4, but I personally use Class 10 or UHS-1 (from SanDisk).

Mark


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:52 am 
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Having a lot of fun with the Pentax 25mm 1.4 C-Mount. It does not vignette when taking stills in 16:9 so there is also no vignetting in video! I think it's really worth it considering the price. May be I could tempt you to try one :P

I've made some nice videos outdoor of family with my 14-42mm X super compact. It's really sharp outdoors. It was shocking for me to see sticking my sd card in a big screen TV).

Quote:
the G6's base ISO is 160. So, per the Sunny 16 Rule, to shoot at f2.0, you'd need six stops of compensation. So even if you did try to compensate with shutter speed (which, again, you shouldn't), you'd exceed the G6's fastest shutter speed after only four stops. i.e. you'd be overexposed by two stops.


A clarification, if I may: at f16 that would mean shutter at 1/160 with iso 160. So compensating by shutter speed means increasing the shutter speed (of 1/160) by six stops? So f2.0 would require a shutter speed of 1/640 (looking at my camera), and how is that exceeding the fastest shutter speed on the G6?

Looked at your bokeh test again as per your suggestion. I see the perspectives for the first two are the same (pancake 20mm and 14-140mm at 19mm), with more out of focus background (bokeh) with the wider aperture. At 140mm fully zoomed the perspective really changes. Do still have the dolly zoom example in mind but it seems that primes are the better choice over tele-zooming because of the perspective they give.

Just thinking about Olympus 75mm prime you mentioned. It's way over my budget. I see there is a Sigma 60mm f2.8 made for m43 that has fantastic reviews. Similar spec to the Olympus 60mm but less than half the price (and looks much smaller in size). Considering that it's only a bit longer than my 14-42mm, it might not be worth it as it's not much longer. Yes, there is the different perspective and I guess Panasonic lens at 42mm at f5.6 is quite a bit slower and probably not usable indoors even if lighting is okay?

There is Canon FD 85mm f1.8 found in ebay cheap and can work with a simple adapter. That's as fast as the Olympus 75mm.

Also read that the Carls Zeiss 80mm f2.8 Biometar can be adapted and it's an extremely good lens and is very sharp. Between 60mm and 80mm, is the difference required from the subject being recorded about a foot?

Any thoughts on these?


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:22 am 
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Qadri wrote:
A clarification, if I may: at f16 that would mean shutter at 1/160 with iso 160. So compensating by shutter speed means increasing the shutter speed (of 1/160) by six stops? So f2.0 would require a shutter speed of 1/640 (looking at my camera), and how is that exceeding the fastest shutter speed on the G6?

You're using 1/3 stop increments, not full stops. Remember that a full stop doubles (or halves, if you want to look at it the other way) the amount of light. So to double (or halve) the amount of light with the shutter, you need to double (or halve) the speed/time. i.e. to cut 1/160 shutter speed in half would be 1/320 (one stop). In half again would be 1/640 (two stops), etc.

Quote:
Looked at your bokeh test again as per your suggestion. I see the perspectives for the first two are the same (pancake 20mm and 14-140mm at 19mm), with more out of focus background (bokeh) with the wider aperture. At 140mm fully zoomed the perspective really changes. Do still have the dolly zoom example in mind but it seems that primes are the better choice over tele-zooming because of the perspective they give.

If you want a wide perspective, then yes. If you don't want a wide perspective, then no. Sort of similar to DoF, perspective can also be used to isolate (lead your audience to focus their attention on) your subject, instead of the background. Of course, as we discussed previously, this assumes that there's enough space to move the camera back to get the same framing (or at least framing you find equally satisfying creatively) with a long lens as with a wide lens.

(As an aside: this is one reason why many films/TV shows shoot interiors on a soundstage with false walls that can be "flown" (moved out of the way).)

Quote:
I guess Panasonic lens at 42mm at f5.6 is quite a bit slower and probably not usable indoors even if lighting is okay?

Depends on what you consider "okay" lighting. My personal view is that, if the lighting restricts your creative freedom (i.e. doesn't allow you to control DoF by using the aperture you want), then it's not okay. YMMV.

Quote:
Between 60mm and 80mm, is the difference required from the subject being recorded about a foot?

Depends on the distance to the subject. But basic math says that, for the difference to be 1 foot, the total distance to the subject would have to be 3 feet with the 60mm and 4 feet with the 80mm. But obviously, either lens at those respective distances will result in an extremely tight framing.

Quote:
Any thoughts on these?

Sorry, I'm not familiar with any of the lenses you mentioned.

Glad to hear you're having fun with your camera, tho - Mark


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:19 am 
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Interesting. My problem would be easily solved if you could my director :oops:

On the topic of lighting and camera controls on video, should one's aim be to keep the ISO low as possible as priority - so 160 in the case of the G6? Or does it make no difference whatsoever to go up to say iso 400?

It links into my second question about aperture. Other than the issue of wanting a shallower depth of field, is there anything advantageous in keeping the aperture wider open rather than stopping down?

Just trying to think what the optimal balance is that one should aim for.

It also might help in deciding if you really need to spend more on a fast lens.

Linking in again, this time with what you discussed about primes, I'm thinking of trying a longish zoom before looking at longer primes (for conference type settings). It's just that I'm not sure if I'll have flexibility of space in some places, might have a wall/pillar behind and might not be able to get forward enough in others because of seats or a big stage. When I get more familiar with the focal ranges I regularly use (hopefully there will be more regular ones!), I can look at a prime.

Constant aperture is good for video (zooming in and out while recording) and the one made for M43 I can think of is the Panasoncic 35-100mm f2.8 but it's very expensive. I'm thinking I could try out the Canon fd 35-105mm f3.5 constant aperture for now as it can be picked up quite cheaply and used with an adapter (no auto focus or IS but for fairly stationary objects and shooting on tripod I think I should be ok on that side). Seems to have excellent reviews. I am worried though that f3.5 might not be fast enough indoors, if there are no windows or at night where lighting inside is not great. Any thoughts?


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