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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 5:40 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 8:45 pm
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Hi

Advice really welcome as I have just bought a 10-22mm lens. Autofocus not as sharp as I thought but not sure if I'm expecting too much too soon. Some of the colours on some pictures are also a bit washed out.... Have got some sharp pictures on manual but not consistently yet! Also a number of photos have orange circle, always in bottom left corner which is obviously light related but seems strange, particulary the frequency with which it appears....

Unfortunately as I'm still learning I'm not sure whether this lens is a good or bad copy! Before I go back to the camera shop I would welcome any comments particularly if I am doing something wrong......

A mixture of pictures taken over the last weekend - good and bad - attached.

Bad:
Image
Image
Image
Image

And what looks ok to me but would welcome comment:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Many thanks!


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 6:14 pm 
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Location: UK
The orange blobs I think are lens flare. These are reflections of a bright light, such as the sun, and can result in unwanted bright bits in a line between where the light is and the middle of the lens.

Another phenomenon that may be encountered in bright light is glare. Again caused by unwanted reflections and can cause the whole image to go lighter.

Both the above are not easy to solve. Keeping the sun out of view of the lens is one way if not particularly helpful all the time. You can try shading the lens although with a wide angle this is also not always practical.

As the images are so small, I can't comment on the level of detail or focus accuracy. Generally with such wide angle lenses, most things are in focus anyway as long as you're not too far off. You can nudge this in your favour if you use Av mode and set to f/8.

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Lenses: EF 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8, 135/2+SF, 28-80 V, 70-300L, 100-400L, TS-E 24/3.5L, MP-E 65, EF-S 15-85 IS
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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 6:22 pm 
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Many thanks


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 8:59 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 141
Hi Anne,

Welcome to the forum. I had a quick look at your "bad" photos. We can see the full size photos on Flickr.

In photo one it looks like you focused on the statue in the foreground and that the building in the background is out of focus. The image was shot with f9. As you seem to be fairly close to the statue try moving back a bit if possible and focus in between the building and the statue. About one third behind the statue and two thirds in front of the back edge of the building. A smaller f-stop (bigger number) like f16 or f22 could also help with getting everything in focus. It might take a bit of practice to get everything in focus and try out different things.

As popo also said there is a lens flare in both the first and second photos. It's hard to avoid these sometimes. Trying to block the light and being in the shade can help but if you can't avoid it you can either crop it out or clone it out using software.

The third and fourth ones didn't show up for some reason but by right clicking and opening it in another tab I was able to view them too. The third one is overexposed to me. Try dialing the exposure back by around 1.5 stops. If your software or camera only allows 1/3rd of a stop at a time, try both 1+1/3rd and 1+2/3rd and see which one you like best. You can do this also when you take the photo by using the exposure compensation to get this right when taking the photo.

The fourth one shows in the Exif data that you used manual focus but unfortunately nothing looks in focus. I don't know if your camera has this but most cameras will show a green dot in the viewfinder when you have achieved focus.

I hope this information is useful to you. Sorry if some of it came across a bit harsh.

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Camera: Nikon D60
Lenses: Nikon AF-S DX 18-55 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR, Nikon AF-S VR 70-300 f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED
Flash: Nikon SB-910
Tripod: Joby Gorillapod Focus with Ball Head X, Manfrotto 055CXPRO4 with Manfrotto MH054M0-Q5 ballhead


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 9:20 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 8:45 pm
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Welcome comments - many thanks for taking time to reply. Assume from my inexperience with lens and better pictures attached that you consider lens unlikely to be problem?


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 10:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 141
I find that you got more good photos than bad photos with the lens. When you buy a new lens you need to get used to it and learn it's strengths and limitations. That takes time so try different things, see what works and doesn't work.

It's hard for me to say if the lens has a problem but I would keep trying with it.

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Camera: Nikon D60
Lenses: Nikon AF-S DX 18-55 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR, Nikon AF-S VR 70-300 f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED
Flash: Nikon SB-910
Tripod: Joby Gorillapod Focus with Ball Head X, Manfrotto 055CXPRO4 with Manfrotto MH054M0-Q5 ballhead


Flickr


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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 6:10 am 
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Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 8:45 pm
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Thank you.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 4:08 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2011 10:52 am
Posts: 94
1. As mentioned above the problem in image 1 and 2 is lens flare. It happens when you shoot facing towards bright sun and is caused when light enters the lens and reflects off some of the internal elements. I think wider angle lenses are more prone to this. A lens hood will help to reduce the effect as will not shooting directly towards the sun. If you really need to shoot into the sun then a piece of card (your grey card if you have one) held up to shade the lens can block this.

2. Focusing issue. You will need to understand what to focus on in order to achieve your desired aims. The two key issues you will need to understand are Depth of Field (how much of an image will be in focus with a particular aperture setting) and hyper-focal distance (where to focus to maximise Depth of Field). I would suggest you search Youtube for these two phrases as there are a host of good tutorials.

I would specifically recommend AdoramaTV and a good set of tutorials on numerous camera subjects. I found them very helpful http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xnn5nzPvoIM

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Dan Marchant
I am learning photo graphee - see the results at www.danmarchant.com


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 5:44 am 
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Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 8:45 pm
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Thanks.


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