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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 5:53 pm 
Firstly is it Image stabilisator on this lense?
also is it a decent first time main lense?


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 8:24 pm 
Sunnyhope - I'm no expert at all on lenses, but do know the basics. In 'lens-speak' OS means "optical stabilisation".

If you're moving from midrange or bridge-zoom P&S cameras to DSLR, you'll have been used to having the "anti-shake" or "stabilising" built-in to the camera itself.

Some DSLRs, including Pentax, do have the "SR", or shake-reduction, built into the camera body. Such DSLR bodies "stabilise" all lenses mounted on them, including the wide variety of Film-SLR lenses from past eras - this can be beneficial for people with low fixed incomes, like myself.

However, the most popular / widespread DSLRs, Canon and Nikon, don't put the stabilising in the camera body. That means they can then offer ranges of lenses without or with stabilising in the the lenses - those without it can have the same optics (not always) - but be lower cost than the lenses with stabilising added.

There's an ongoing "debate" about whether in-body or in-lens stabilising is best - but from Forums and Reviews the Nikon / Canon in-lens stabilising being best seems to be ahead - particularly for "long and fast'' lenses used for rapid action such as Sports.

There's a Review of the lens you mention at:

- http://www.photozone.de/Reviews/321-sig ... rt--review

Regards, Dave.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 8:31 pm 
oldwarbler wrote:
Sunnyhope - I'm no expert at all on lenses, but do know the basics. In 'lens-speak' OS means "optical stabilisation".

If you're moving from midrange or bridge-zoom P&S cameras to DSLR, you'll have been used to having the "anti-shake" or "stabilising" built-in to the camera itself.

Some DSLRs, including Pentax, do have the "SR", or shake-reduction, built into the camera body. Such DSLR bodies "stabilise" all lenses mounted on them, including the wide variety of Film-SLR lenses from past eras - this can be beneficial for people with low fixed incomes, like myself.

However, the most popular / widespread DSLRs, Canon and Nikon, don't put the stabilising in the camera body. That means they can then offer ranges of lenses without or with stabilising in the the lenses - those without it can have the same optics (not always) - but be lower cost than the lenses with stabilising added.


Ty, i m getting the Nikon D3100 but before i v only had compact cameras like casio exilim so i m very new to this but i have the chance getting a barely used camera with this lense with some other equipment and i just wanted to make sure this was a good lense as it will be my only lense for a while....
I dont know if knowing what camera i will use it on will help you more but i m greatful for all the help i can get
There's an ongoing "debate" about whether in-body or in-lens stabilising is best - but from Forums and Reviews the Nikon / Canon in-lens stabilising being best seems to be ahead - particularly for "long and fast'' lenses used for rapid action such as Sports.

Regards, Dave.


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