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 Post subject: 12 Mile Road March
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 2:02 am 
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Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 4:15 pm
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Location: Kanduhar, Afghanistan
The Expert Field Medical Badge is one of the toughest awards to earn in the Army. It is a test of Combat Medics skills and culminates in a 12 mile road march that has to be completed in 3-hours. We got there late and missed most of the competitors. This is at the dreaded 11-mile mark, so close yet not quite there. The lighting was bad with it over my shoulder and a bridge casting a bad shadow.
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Sunrise Roadmarch by sherpa1d, on Flickr

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Too Happy on a Road March by sherpa1d, on Flickr

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To the Mountains by sherpa1d, on Flickr

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Oh the PAIN by sherpa1d, on Flickr

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 10:04 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2011 10:52 am
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number 3 and 4 are my favourites.

number 1. I think you needed to take the picture 3 second earlier or 3 seconds later. As it is you caught them just as they were in deep shadow, against a very bright background. The result is you can't see them at all. A good alternative for this situation would be to wait for them to get closer and then get down low and shoot up at them so they are silhouetted against the bright sky.

number 2 is ok but you have cut their feet off while having empty space above their heads.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 5:46 pm 
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Location: Kanduhar, Afghanistan
Thanks, I appreciate the comments. Yeah, I 'll have to watch the feat. I think I got another one that had the feet but I was looking at her smile and didn't check that image for other issues. I'll watch more for things like that.

I knew when I took #1 it was bad, it was the very first one I took when I walked out and knew then the bridge and direction I had to shoot was going to bother me. So as I did my touch-ups I decided to play. I opened it in CameraRAW and bumped the black way up then adjusted the colors to bring out the sunrise. I think if you could really tell more they were Soldiers it might look a little better.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 9:20 pm 
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About legs
Position suggests if somebody is in motion or standing.
Even if in motion if the legs are close on to the other the suggestion is not so strong.
One of the basic street (or any kind) photographer’s skills is to be able to anticipate motion and take the picture at the right moment. With a little (or more) practice you can take the picture exactly when the person is in the position you choose. There are two basic legs positions that suggest more movement than any other. One is when a person is raising the leg behind him and the other is with a leg in front of him just before it touches the ground.
The first I call the “back leg” and the other the “front leg” . Because it lasts longer, the “back leg” is more common. The “front leg” position is harder to catch deliberately (as a photographer should), it needs more practice.
The secret with moving subjects is that if you raise your camera and press the button exactly when the subject is in the desired position, it’s too late. So anticipate and and shoot a few fractions of a second before. How much? Practice will tell you.this is an example of the “back leg”. Not too hard to catch it.
Image
untitled shoot-073.jpg by Radu Coman, on Flickr
This is the “front leg” . You can catch it if you press the button at the moment the moving leg just passes the one standing on the ground.
Image
untitled shoot-072.jpg by Radu Coman, on Flickr

You can take some time and practice catching the exact position you choose. When you can do it ten out of ten, the practice catching that position in a predetermined frame. Let’s say one third of the frame width when the person is moving towards the frame center. If you do that long enough it will become second nature and you’ll get the people exactly where you want them and when you want them, and with everything you choose into the frame
And remember, on time is too late
By the way, I like the first one

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 9:30 pm 
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Location: NW England
Something I hadn't even thought about tbh. Great tips. Thank you. 8)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 10:43 pm 
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Location: Kanduhar, Afghanistan
Thanks Radu! Sometimes I rely to much on a burst of photos instead of really looking at what I'm shooting and how I'm going to compose it which if I would do that I'm sure it will go ways in helping me get better

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 5:41 am 
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Location: Kanduhar, Afghanistan
Yep, I went back and looked and I sure did cut off a lot of feet. Gona have to watch that.

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Canon 550D | Canon EF 35mm 1:2 | Canon 50 f/1.8 II | Sigma 18-125mm DC OS | Tamron SP 70-300mm Di VC USD | Canon 430EX II
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 12:53 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2009 2:03 am
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Location: Gold Coast Australia
I agree with the thought of predicting of movement, I like shooting marathons and I'm very happy with the results caching movement and tense leg muscels. I would suggest using continuous mode, that way you have more than one chance to capture your intentions. Also shoot a bit wide, cropping will not have any discernable effect.

After 11 mile, I don't think you are likely capture anyone striding or with two feet of the ground with that pack on.

Cheers

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