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 Post subject: Converging Verticals
PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2011 3:15 am 
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Last edited by dubaiphil on Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:31 pm 
Excuse my ignorance, but I don't understand the term "converging verticals"!

Just a beginner question! Nice shot, I can't see what's wrong with it though. Surely even if the buildings were taller, the camera wouldn't portray them as joined at the top?


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:33 am 
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I was being 'ironic', Mitchell86 :D

When shooting, and it's particularly with a wide angle lens, if the camera isn't exactly parrallel with the ground and with the horizon through the middle of the image, then anything with height will lean. More so towards the edges of the frame.

So your options with the shot are:

a - To take a shot with the camera parallel to the ground and crop off the bottom of the image, maintaining vertical verticals.

b - To take a shot to fit everything in, keeping the leaning buildings and then to distort and warp the image in photoshop. You'll have to shoot wider that you at first anticipate to allow 'space' to distort the image and maintain the composition you're after.

c - Keep the leaning buildings as they are

d - buy a tilt shift lens, which can minimise the converging verticals.

This is a slightly extreme version of converging verticals, where the camera is pointed directly upwards for effect.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:35 am 
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And if you go for option b, you need to leave some space in your composition at the bottom. Once you're corrected the leaning buildings they will appear shorter and more squat. Keeping space at the bottom of the original image means that you can fix the lean and then stretch the image vertically to recover the height of the buildings. This can create some image quality loss though in extreme examples.


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