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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2011 5:43 pm 
Next weekend I'm going back to the place where these shots here taken

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Click on the image to see the set in Picasa

Gordon is lending me his fisheye lens, I'm not sure what focal length exactly.

I'm planning on getting off the ground and onto a rope to get some shots from right by the side and above the action.

Any top tips for using a fisheye in this enviroment. Particularly composition


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2011 6:02 pm 
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I don't have any experience of that particular subject type, but following are some general hints on fisheye lenses.

Assuming it's a diagonal fisheye on crop sensors (the image fills the frame) then the field of view is up to 180 degrees across the diagonal. I say "up to" because 3rd party lenses are designed to work on 1.5x crop not 1.6x of Canon so field of view will be slightly less. In practice it isn't noticeable... I don't imagine it'll be a circular fisheye for this application, unless it's a full frame circular which would appear cropped with dark regions, in which case you might need to watch the camera metering.

Anyway, with the very wide field of view it means you need to be careful anything you don't want in shot isn't. That'll probably be you and your kit!

Also the wide angle means everything looks small as a portion of the image. You may need to get closer than you otherwise think, but then you also get perspective effects on top of the intrinsic distortion.

The depth of field is quite insane so don't worry about accurate focusing. You can easily get away with setting f/8 and apply hyperfocal distance or a rough approximation. Not sure what it's like hanging up there so live view may or may not be useful.

Beyond that... I guess see what else other people have done in this area and see what you like or don't like, then try it out yourself.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2011 7:03 pm 
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Get as close as you're comfortable with...and then even closer!

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2011 7:16 pm 
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You'll be surprised how close you need to get but I'm sure the results will be awesome if you pull it off.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:02 am 
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Get in close is all that I can say, it seems that things never go out of focus with fisheye lenses. After trying a few portraits with a fisheye lens once in a camera store, I just about bumped the front element into someone's face while taking a shot, that's how close you can get.

Other than that, try some shots that you'll straighten out later, you may get some interesting effects there.

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Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:37 pm 
Hi,

just a few other additions:
- I warmly recommend FishEye Hemi for straightening out images. It is far better than anythng else I have tried.
- Unless you want a very strong fish-eye effect, keep the horizon and key vertical close to or in the center. It's hard to straighten out images that have the verticals or horizontals 2/3 to one side.
- Most fish-eyes do not accept screw-in filters. Either get a Cokin-mount or be very very careful..lol.
- Don't be afraid to get the sun in the picture - most fish-eyes do really well and have very little flaring
- Don't forget basic compositional thumb-rules in the excitement of using a fish-eye. They still apply - perhaps most of all: foreground interest.

Last, but not least: share some of them with us here?

Good luck - Cheers :-)


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