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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 12:28 pm 
I currently have a Sony a330, but the image quality isn't cutting it for me, and that it's only 10.2mp. I get considerable amounts of noise even at low ISOs. I've been eyeing the Canon T3i which I can get a great deal on, but the upcoming Sony a65 looks jam-packed with amazing features. I prefer Canon and Sony over Nikon.

Any suggestions are appreciated!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 12:44 pm 
What do you mean by "best image quality?"

Do you define that to be the most resolution? Or the best low light capabilities? Or better colour accuracy? Etc

What lens are you currently using? If it is the Sony 18-55mm, that is probably why your images are a bit soft and dull. A lens upgrade may be a better choice.

Also, are you shooting RAW or Jpeg?


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:07 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 8:21 pm
Posts: 169
megapixel count isnt the main concern in a camera, what lenses do you currently have,

a d40 can produce brilliant pictures and its only 6megapixel


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:09 pm 
I'm looking for higher resolution photos with crisper details, and lower noise. I'm using the kit lens and a f/1.7 Minolta 50mm and a f/3.5-4.5 Minolta 70-210mm. I'm shooting in RAW and importing in Adobe Lightroom.

Here are some shots I took with the 50mm:

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z2/u ... C02088.jpg - 1/4000s, ISO 100, f/1.7
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z2/u ... C02126.jpg - 1/60s, ISO 400, f/1.7

Perhaps it's a technical error, but there seems to be quite a bit of noise at even ISO400.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:15 pm 
If you want higher resolution pictures, then either Canon, or one of the new Sony 24mp cameras are probably the way to go.

Shooting RAW is the reason your shots are noisy though. Shooting RAW doesnt include any noise reduction, sharpening, contrast etc, you have to add all of this yourself in post.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:15 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 8:21 pm
Posts: 169
what settings have you done in lightroom, never used the sony so cant comment on the camera


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:18 pm 
Ah, thanks for clearing that up. All I've done in Lightroom is color correction. I'll look at some other features. Thanks!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:20 pm 
If you dont understand what RAW is or how to use lightroom, shoot jpeg :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:23 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 8:21 pm
Posts: 169
or learn what raw is and how to edit it :D,
can you shoot raw+jpeg on your camera :D will allow you to have the jpegs as well as the raw file to practice editing.

i always add noise reduction, dont add too much though


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:24 pm 
Hm, I didn't realize post-processing was so important. Thanks for the help.

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z2/u ... 2126-1.jpg


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 8:21 pm
Posts: 169
it isnt on jpeg, but is on raw,

raw is just raw data that comes from the sensor, no settings are applied in the camera, with jpeg, the camera sets the noise reduction, sharpening, saturation etc


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:31 pm 
more megapixels can translate into less image quality,because of the pixel sizes. so more megapixels does not equal crispier details ! it all depends on the lenses ! so start thinking less on the body & more on some quality lenses. (primes especially)
as for the body,yeah,you could take a look at the newer Sony A65 or a Canon 60D. (a Nikon D7000 probably would be a better choice,but you said you don't like Nikon for some reason)


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:42 pm 
sbl03 wrote:
I didn't realize post-processing was so important


As stephen says, it isnt on jpeg, but it is on raw.

Shooting Jpeg is saying that you wont touch the photo in post, or just apply small adjustments, shooting RAW is saying you are going to edit it fully


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 2:12 pm 
I really appreciate the input! Great forum :)


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 3:52 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 5:23 pm
Posts: 827
Location: Boca Raton, FL, USA
Basically, the difference between the two is this: JPGs are a processed photo, using the built-in processing software from the camera, to produce a final photo ready to print or display. You CAN still alter them and process them further if so desired, and using the camera's controls you can manipulate how those JPGs are processed by the camera (picture controls offer color profiles, adjustable contrast, saturation, and sharpness)...but what you get is a fully processed photo. RAW files are just what they sound like - they are unprocessed - they come from the camera chock full of excess information with no processing applied at all - it's up to you to choose how much to process them...you can choose the 'defaults' of the RAW program you're using, which may be the defaults recommended by the camera, or you can use your skills to create the final result you desire. But you do all of it at the computer, rather than in the camera. You have much more leeway to alter or process than with the JPG file, but won't get much more out of it without the basic skills and understanding to do it.

Don't get too caught up in feeling like you need to shoot RAW to be a professional...you don't. Many pros and very skilled photographers choose to shoot JPG, and for some people it's the preferred or better choice. The more you get right in the camera, the less 'need' you have for RAW to alter or correct things. If you're an avid computerhead who loves time spent in front of the computer, then RAW can be an absolute pleasure and the preferred shooting method even if you do get everything right in the camera. If you enjoy the photography more than the computer, then bump up your skills with the camera and learn to manipulate your camera's JPG output and nail your exposures and shoot in JPG, that way you can spend minimal time in front of the glowing screen of your computer.

As for the Sony A300 - it isn't a super-strong low light performer, but you should be able to pretty comfortably shoot up to ISO1600 with very decent results. The Sony sensors starting with the A500 and up are excellent with high ISO and low light shooting, with much better noise control and detail retention, but remember too that noise is amplified by many things - are you using DRO settings in low light that can boost shadow brightness resulting in more noise? Are you underexposing shots in low light which will cause much stronger noise? Have you set the in-camera noise reduction settings properly so when you shoot in JPG you get better noise results, or are you using good noise reduction software on your RAW shots to pull out the noise?

There's no question you'll get a better low light camera if you move to a newer Sony model - you don't have to go for the new A65 - the A500, A550, A450, A33, A55, A560, and A580, all will do much better than your current camera - some of those can be found on closeout or used and give you an excellent camera with all the same features you like on your A300 (in body stabilization, tilt LCD, fast live view). But you can also get better with your A300, and should be more than capable of shooting clean ISO1600s and usable ISO3200s.

_________________
Justin Miller
Sony DSLR-A580 / Sony 18-250mm / Minolta 50mm F1.7 / Sigma 30mm F1.4 / Tamron 10-24mm / Tamron 150-600mm / Tamron 90mm F2.8 macro / Minolta 300mm F4 APO
Sony A6000 / 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 / 55-210mm F4-6.3 / 10-18mm F4 / 35mm F1.8 / 16mm F2.8 / via manual adapter, lots of Pentax K mount, Konica K/AR mount, and Leica M mount manual lenses

Galleries:
http://www.pbase.com/zackiedawg


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