Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Wed Jul 23, 2014 2:04 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Cwmcarn MTB
PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 6:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 7:02 pm
Posts: 266
Location: Wales
Some MTB shots from today, I tasked myself with going manual but battled with the sun and clouds all afternoon so not sure about them overall, there was another guy there using a flash but being an ex biker I'm not to fussed on a flash firing when I'm in mid flight but he said it was all about positioning and timing. I'd also have to brush up on my flash skills, I'm not to sure about shooting sport with a flash.

I'd love some C&C but appreciate they're a bit samey.

1
Image
Cwmcarn by jkstacey, on Flickr
2
Image
Cwmcarn by jkstacey, on Flickr
3
Image
Cwmcarn by jkstacey, on Flickr
4
Image
Cwmcarn by jkstacey, on Flickr
5
Image
Cwmcarn by jkstacey, on Flickr
6
Image
Cwmcarn by jkstacey, on Flickr
7
Image
Cwmcarn by jkstacey, on Flickr

_________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order" - Eric Morecambe
________________________________________
D7000 and too many lenses.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 6:31 pm 
My C&C is from the view point of a crap photographer but an enthusiatic mountain biker :D

While they're not bad photos they're not great photos. Problem seems to me that the biker is not separated from the background, its actually quite hard to see them in most of the photos.

The view point you've got is great for catching the action but gives you a difficult back ground to shoot against. This is amplified by the dark clothes many of the subjects are wearing.

I guess a flash would help a lot by lighting the bikers so they pop and separate from the background in this location

Because of the clothing and bike in 7 the problem is dramatically reduced


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 9:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 27, 2010 6:33 pm
Posts: 167
Location: UK, Zummerzet
From the point of view of a crap photographer and arthritic sloth, I pretty much agree with what @ianganderton said before - dark backrounds and dark tops.
I also agree with what you say about being reluctant to use flash and I don't think that the weather helped you too much either.

_________________
Dent, Arthur Dent.

Pentax k-30 and k-x with DAL 18-55mm and DAL 55-300mm, Tamron 18-50mm and Camera Labs Straps.....hang on, where's my towel?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 9:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 7:02 pm
Posts: 266
Location: Wales
Thanks Ian, That's pretty much what i was thinking and unfortunately most riders were in dark colours and Cwmcarn is a very green venue. If anybody can offer strobe advice in this situation that'd be great, I have an SB600.

_________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order" - Eric Morecambe
________________________________________
D7000 and too many lenses.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 10:08 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 7:02 pm
Posts: 266
Location: Wales
And this guy was a dream to shoot, showbaoting with light clothing and a bright green bike.

Image
Cwmcarn Panorama by jkstacey, on Flickr

_________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order" - Eric Morecambe
________________________________________
D7000 and too many lenses.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 3:03 am 
I saw this one on the "photo of the day" thread and its an excellent image, really like it.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 3:25 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
Posts: 1819
jkstacey - what camera are you using? Nikon CLS capable?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 7:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 7:02 pm
Posts: 266
Location: Wales
Hi Phil I'm using a D7000 apart from the cls I also have a cheap radio flash sync.

_________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order" - Eric Morecambe
________________________________________
D7000 and too many lenses.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 8:01 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
Posts: 1819
In bright light the CLS might not be effective unless you've got a master flash to aim at the IR on the SB-600 remotely.

In these overcast conditions the on board flash may trigger though - I'd suggest having a play.

Try youtube for balancing ambient and flash, outdoor stobe photography etc. You'll find a lot of anoraks taking photos of themselves on timer (!) but there'll be some useful advice in there.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/03/lighting-101.html is another useful resource.

Once you've learnt and understood how to control the SB-600 remotely using the on board flash and menu, I'd pop outside in similar lighting conditions to practise with your gear on a stationary object at around the same distance you can get away with when photographing the cyclists. If you're SB-600 can produce enough power to illuminate the subject then you're good to go. Try using manual modes and TTL modes. The way the ambient light can be controlled can differ between manual and TTL - here's a good link:

http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-photog ... e-shutter/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 8:04 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
Posts: 1819
So if CLS works in your outdoor scenario, you have two on board options for controlling your SB-600 - Full Manual or TTL

If the on board flash is overpowered by sunlight and doesn't trip the SB-600, the radio triggers will work in Full Manual mode only (unless you're got Pocket Wizard's new Flex system, which are pretty cool and expensive by the way!)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 8:19 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 7:02 pm
Posts: 266
Location: Wales
Thanks i'm going to give it a go but perhaps when the riders are not so vulnerable to an off :lol: what about shutter speed? I was shooting at around 1/1000 sometimes more with a high ISO but the strobe will only allow 1/250

_________________
"I'm playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order" - Eric Morecambe
________________________________________
D7000 and too many lenses.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 8:53 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
Posts: 1819
Look at the D7000 manual - you'll be able to set up high speed synch to shoot up to 1/8000th.

If you're shooting in TTL with the flash controlled off camera by the on board flash, dialling in -1EV should reduce the ambient and flash exposure. Then dialling in +1 Flash EV on top will cancel out the Flash underexposure, giving a bit of separation between the subject and background.

This is where Nikon TTL differs from Canon TTL - in Canon I think changing the exposure comp. doesn't effect the flash, whereas in Nikon it does.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 10:03 am 
this maybe a dumb question but I'll ask it anyway

Would shooting with a slower shutter speed, a flash and some panning movement not produce an effect where the background was blurred more and the subject frozen and so separating the subject from the background more.

Think about this subject has me looking back at these photos http://ianganderton.wordpress.com/2010/ ... hotoshoot/

These were taken by a magazine photographer and he used a remote flash held up high on a 'stick'. Definitely created some separation of the subject from the background

Image

Image

If I was biking and someone was taking photos with a flash I wouldnt be bothered as long as its not in my direct line of sight and blinding me. This is happening in daylight so its only adding a bit of light not providing ALL the light. The problems would occur in dark areas where a sudden flash would force your eyes to adjust and then not be able to see


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 10:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
Posts: 1819
Yes - that's where rear curtain flash comes in.

Firing at the end of the actuation so the subject will be flashed at the end of the pan.

Or regular front curtain flash where the opposite occurs.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 10:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
Posts: 1819
But if you're shooting in Manual then the slower shutter will increase the ambient exposure and make the background lighter.

If you're in TTL mode the background will have the same exposure


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group