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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:38 am 
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Location: Norfolk, England
I have the D300s and a Nikon lens 16-85. Very pleased with it. Because of the higher resolution, I am thinking of changing the D300s for a D7000. I shoot jpgs, not raw and 95 % of my shots are shot in single mode. I would like to hear the opinion from the members here, please.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:45 am 
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Personally I wouldnt.

All you are gaining is resolution, and you are sacrificing many things.

The extra resolution isnt even that impressive, it is only a 15% linear increase.

The dynamic range and noise performance are allegedly better, noise is fair enough, but I haven't seen any dynamic range performance that I dont think I can get out of my D300.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 2:21 pm 
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Location: Vancouver, Canada
Hi Erik,

As always, it depends on the value you attach to the different characteristics of a camera. However, in this particular situation you would be engaging in a bit of a trade-off. The D7000 is a more modern offering and it does have some improvements, but the camera itself belongs in the "serious amateur" class whereas the D300s is an "enthusiast"-class camera.

The durability of the the D300s and it's ruggedness makes it a real workhorse that can withstand more abuse than the D7000. On the other hand, you get a modest, but real, resolution increase, better noise-handling/higher usable ISO and improved dynamic range.

In my personal opinion, I find these two models too close to each other in performance, to warrant the switch - but that's just me.

Good luck with your deliberations!

Cheers :-)

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 6:01 pm 
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Location: Winterpeg, Manisnowba, Canada
Hey, Erik,

I'd personally hold off from getting the D7000. Don't get me wrong, I love mine, but it will feel like a downgrade from the D300s. Although continuous doesn't matter to you, you'll feel that the ergonomics and build quality just isn't the same when compared to the D300s. You'll also miss features like the excellent AF system, less shutter lag, etc.

What I would do if I were you, is wait for the D400 (which should be coming soon, I was hoping that it was coming with the announcement today, but it was just Coolpix cameras), we may see a D400 in September with either the D7000's 16 MP sensor, or the new 24 MP sensor from Sony.

If you really don't think that you'd miss the awesome build or AF system of the D300s and feel that the D7000 is comfortable enough in your hands, go ahead and bite the bullet. However, just be aware that the D400 is going to be coming in the near future, but if you're on a bit of a budget the D7000 would be an excellent camera.

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Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:59 am 
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I have the older regular D300 and the thought of "upgrading" to the D7000 haven't even crossed my mind. In my opinion there isn't much in the way of an upgrade and you would be sacrificing some features as well.

Personally, I've been investing in lenses this summer and am planning on picking up a used D700 when Nikon finally decide to release the D700s/D800 or w/e it'll be called. The D7000 may have slightly better high ISO performance compared to the D300 and D300s but the D700/D3 are in a completely different (higher) league. I rented a D700 for a indoor concert project this summer and was absolutely floored by it's high ISO performance.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:17 pm 
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the d7000 has wonky colors. be forewarned. I still haven't figured out how to work with it...

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:26 pm 
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Location: Bristol, UK
Well, all I can say is that I have a D200 and just brought a D7000 after debating between the D7000 and D300s.

If you read all the reviews and comparisons you will see that the D7000 is considered a better camera than the D300s in almost every area - better processor, better metering etc.

I think the ergonomics point is a good one and I will say that the D7000 does feel completely different to my D200 (and I guess the D300s) but it hasnt made me regret my choice, just takes a bit of getting used to.

Im not sure about the wonky colours - havent read about this or experienced it so far.

As for holding out for the D400 its entirely up to you but the rumours have been around since 2008 and I personally feel it will be a little way off yet. Although, having said that, whenever I buy new kit it seems a new model is released within week of me buying. So I may have made the release of the D400 immanent, lol.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:17 am 
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If you like the D300s, hang onto it. When you feel it is limiting you, then look around.

I bought my D7000 to supplement the D90 (don't like changing lenses in the field), but I use them interchangeably. Actually, I think that the D90 has wonkier colours than the D7000 in jpeg!

My D40, as a more portable camera is also good.

Honestly, you'd only notice the difference at very large photo sizes.

If you're happy with something, keep with it.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 1:37 am 
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Location: Gold Coast Australia
Hi all, twice the term wonkier colours has been used in this thread regarding the D7000, could someone please expand on this, :?


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 2:17 am 
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Perhaps I should clarify.

I'm happy with the D7000 - stable with colour and exposure for me. It is the D90 that can get a bit inventive with a jpeg sometimes (and the D40 - prone to indigo seas here in Australia).

How a camera reacts to jpegs is always a bit interpretive and I usually solve the problem by bracketing the colour temperature setting.

It's no big drama - a camera is a tool that one learns to use, and they all have their little foibles.

Shooting RAW is another way to help sort things out.

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Nikon DSLRs, film cameras from Leica to Linhof


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 9:40 am 
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Location: Bristol, UK
I always shoot RAW. Whilst I aim to get everything right in camera at the time of exposure I feel happier shooting in raw as it offers far more latitude in editing should anything not quite go to plan.

Sure file sizes are big but memory is cheap now so that's not such an issue.

I would second the comment above about sticking with what you've got if your happy with it.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 9:34 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 11:55 pm
Posts: 850
Location: SE Texas
I would like to see more discussion of the D7000's colors with JPEGs. My wife's employer has decided to allow them to use personal cameras and lenses, as attrition, and the better cameras being claimed by the lab, first meant that the investigators had to share cameras, and more recently, there have not been enough cameras in a good state of repair. My wife had been using a D300s, but it went to the lab, so she has been sharing a couple of D200 cameras with other investigators.

My wife's agency uses only Nikons, and personal cameras used on the job must be Nikons. Photos are for evidentiary purposes, and are uploaded as JPEGs.

We went shopping yesterday, just to look and handle at this point, and my wife really liked the handling qualities of the D7000. Light weight is good, due to a recent rotator cuff injury. The mention of "wonky" colors, however, is a concern, but if out-of-camera JPEG colors are good, that is suitable.

Why only JPEGs? These images must suit the legal system. Each step of processing must withstand legal scrutiny. It is the same with my employer; I wear a badge for a different government entity, and must also submit JPEGs.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 2:46 pm 
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Location: SE Texas
I bought my wife a D7000, with the lighter weight being a deciding factor, as she is recovering from an injury. I could have bought a very gently-used or factory refurbished D300s for about the same price as a new D7000, so cost was not a deciding issue. She seems quite happy with the images. I will ask her if she finds resolution better or about the same.

For what it is worth, she shoots in mostly Manual mode, with an 18-200mm super-zoom lens, and SB-800 flash. Most of her work shift as a forensic investigator is during the hours of darkness.

I have just acquired a Nikkor 180mm 2.8 with ED glass, a very well-regarded lens, regarding sharpness, so now we can really see how the D7000 performs. Of course, we no longer have the D300s for comparison with the same glass.

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Canon 7D/5D/40D/1D2N; Nikon F6, D700, FM3A, & Coolpix A; Canon 40mm 2.8 STM, 135L, 50L, 35L, pre-II 50mm 1.8, 100mm 2.8L Macro, 10-22mm EF-S, 28-135 EF, 400mm 5.6L; Nikkor 50mm 1.2 AI-S, 50mm 1.4G, 50mm 1.8D, 16mm 2.8D Fisheye, 180mm 2.8D, 100-300mm 5.6 AI-S; Tokina 17mm & 100mm 2.8 Macro


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2011 1:41 am 
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Location: Gold Coast Australia
@RexGix, Looking forward to see some comments. I don't shoot flash but I imagine for night shooting you need to have plenty of experience with flash or everything will be blown out.


Cheers

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2011 4:23 am 
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Location: Winterpeg, Manisnowba, Canada
I'm still waiting for the D400. I probably would've preferred the size and ergonomics of a D300s over my D7000, but the better image quality and lower cost pushed me towards the D7000. A D400 would've been perfect, especially with the new 24 MP Sony sensor, but sadly it's not here yet. Hopefully the flooding in Thailand won't have too much of an effect on this. My question though, is what will the D400 have that will justify the $300 price difference between it and the D7000? As of right now, the D7000 has just about all of the features of the D300s, the 100% coverage viewfinder, HD video, the ability to meter with older AI-S lenses, a similar (but slightly slower) framerate and an excellent AF system, plus a newer sensor, a newer metering system and many other features that make the D7000 a better choice. So, Nikon's going to need to have something pretty spectacular up their sleeves. Hopefully, this will be more than the standard "New sensor, faster framerate and better AF" update.

By the way, RexGig, why did you decide on Nikon for your wife when you're a Canon shooter? Wouldn't you want the ability to use each others' lenses?

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-Evan

Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
- Ansel Adams


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