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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 8:29 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:34 am
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Hi all
When taking my shots from the plane it is through polarized windows (double panes).

Should/does this make any difference to the photo?
I ask because I notice most of my shots come out quite badly over exposed if I use any of the auto or pre-set modes, WB, ActiveD lighting etc.

This is more out of sheer curiosity more than anything as I know I can fix this by changing the EV settings etc.

If anyone has any other useful tips on shooting from the aircraft I´d love to hear from you!

Thanks
Dara

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 12:30 am 
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Location: St. John's, NL, Canada
The auto settings should have tried to compensate for this. Did you have any of the aircraft interior in the shot? The interior would be relatively dark compared to the outside (assuming it was daytime). This would have made your camera battle between the two exposures and eventually landing (pun totally intended) on something that was not appropriate for the shot. So to answer your question, no there is nothing special about an aircraft window that would throw off the photo. If you could post the photos I or someone else could perhaps give a more detailed critique and diagnosis.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 9:14 am 
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Hi Trevor
Thanks for the feedback, below is one example I have.

On the D90 I was in "P" shooting mode.
F/8, shutter 1/1000, ISO 200, exposure -0.3. WB set for direct sunlight. ActiveD on high.

Image

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:11 pm 
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I'd like others to comment on this, but I think what is causing your overexposed image is haze in the air. This can be mitigated by using a polarizer filter. You can also have a look at dubaiphil's comments on his photo's on this thread. He was having a similar problem:

http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=27714&highlight=

Hope this helps!

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Trevor Harris

Nikon D200
SB-600
YN-560 II
YN RF 603 x 4
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8
Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8
Nikon AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:49 pm 
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Can you use a polarised filter through polarised windows? I have a UV filter.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 7:14 pm 
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I wasn't aware that aircraft windows were polarized... not saying they're not, but I've just never heard of that before. If they are, then you'd run into a bit of a problem. A weird thing happens when you put two polarizes together. I'm sure there's some technical wording for what I'm about to say. When you rotate one and keep the other stationary, the image goes black. It's almost like a variable neutral density.

So if they are polarized, then no, you can't use and additional polarizer. Did you try the suggestions on dubaiphil's thread? All of his edits are post processed, i.e. the photo is manipulated afterwards.

UV Filter dose nothing to change how the photo looks - they're just to protect your lens from physical damage and your sensor from UV damage.

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Trevor Harris

Nikon D200
SB-600
YN-560 II
YN RF 603 x 4
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8
Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8
Nikon AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 8:20 pm 
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The flight deck windows are polarised.
So if you wear polarised sunglasses in the flight deck you can´t see anything.
The way I had it explained to me is looking through a polarised glass is like looking through a row of bars (like a jail cell) but a 2nd layer will put another row of "bars" behind the 1st and you can´t see anything.
Although I´m sure someone can give a better description than that!

Thanks for the link, I got photoshop elements today so time to get stuck into editing!

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 9:48 pm 
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Interesting, I didn't know that about the flight deck. Thanks for the tidbit & good luck with the editing!

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Trevor Harris

Nikon D200
SB-600
YN-560 II
YN RF 603 x 4
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8
Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8
Nikon AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 12:07 pm 
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I haven't got iEXIF loaded on my work PC, but it looks as if you're shooting at 105mm (on the 18-105) or higher on the 70-300? If so, you're probably at an altitude of at least 10,000ft and 5+ miles away from the area you're shooting. That's a fair distance to expect clear results.

It is just a case of atmospheric haze with the shot - it doesn't look as if there are any blown highlights. In other words, I'd expect that result with a shot at distance from an aircraft, especially if you're shooting with the sun on your side of the cabin. Shooting from the other side may have resulted in a cleaner shot.

You're going to have to up the contrast and saturation in photoshop or similar to get any results.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 12:09 pm 
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Edit that - presumably you're using the 70-300, from your signature


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:01 pm 
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Thanks Phil!!

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 8:42 pm 
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If anyone is interested this is what using a polarised filters through polarised widows looks like!

Image

Image

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