Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Fri Sep 19, 2014 6:12 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2011 6:42 pm 
Hi everyone !

I'm currently using a 40D, with the following lenses: 28-105/3.5-4.5, 70-300/4-5.6, 50/1.4, 100/2. I also own a 430EX flash.

I'm planning to buy a couple of Sigma lenses: the 17-50/2.8 OS, the 70-200/2.8 OS and the 10/2.8 fisheye.
I also want to upgrade the camera body at the same time, so I'm thinking at either the Canon 7D or the Nikon D7000. I'm considering Nikon because I think that I can buy all the new lenses on the new system (would buy them either way) and sell what I have later. If I go Nikon, I would also buy a Sigma 85/1.4 and a Nikon SB-700 flash.

I shoot mostly architecture, landscapes and portraits, but I also shoot a wedding every now and then, hence my need for f/2.8 zooms.
The reasons for upgrading the camera body are: better high ISO quality, better dynamic range, AF microadjust (really miss it on my 40D), better battery life. I do not shoot video, nor do I plan to do it in the future.

I'm quite scared of all the reports about the 7D's AF issues. My 40D focus is very fast and mostly accurate, but really lacks the microadjust feature.
I'm also afraid that the D7000 won't "remember" the AF microadjust settings for all the Sigma lenses I have in mind - any experience with this ?

What would you recommend ?


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2011 6:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 12:59 pm
Posts: 6009
Location: The Netherlands
I'd get the 7D and use the 40D as a second/backup body. Especially for weddings that comes in handy.

_________________
I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:25 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 7:01 am
Posts: 1167
Location: bit east of Melbourne
It would make sense to stay with Canon. What AF issues is there with the 7D?

_________________
Canon Powershot S95, Canon 6D,7D, Canon 40 2.8 STM, Tamron 24-70 2.8 VC, Canon 17-40 L, Canon 15-85, Canon 85 1.8, Sigma 30 1.4, 50mm 1.8, Canon 100 2.8L Macro, Canon 70-300L +Kenko 1.4 Pro 300DGX, Canon 430EX II and RS 4 Classic


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2011 8:27 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 12:48 pm
Posts: 8028
Location: UK
+1 to the "what AF issues"? The 7D AF I've found to be no worse than the 50D (so effectively same as 40D) in any condition I've come across. It is quite possible that anything else is either unrealistic expectations given the early hype, or possibly user error. The 7D AF isn't miraculous, but still a big step on from the xxD system.

_________________
Canon DSLRs: 7D, 5D2, 1D, 600D, 450D full spectrum, 300D IR mod
Lenses: EF 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8, 135/2+SF, 28-80 V, 70-300L, 100-400L, TS-E 24/3.5L, MP-E 65, EF-S 15-85 IS
3rd party: Zeiss 2/50 makro, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300 f/2.8 OS, Celestron 1325/13
Tinies: Sony HX9V.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:58 pm 
Hello and thank you for your suggestions !

I've read numerous topics, on various forums, that the 7D's AF is not consistent even after applying the latest firmware version. For example, it may focus on a nearer object object in the frame, although that object is not within the area of the selected AF point(s). Additionally, it may either BF or FF by a healthy margin in a series of consecutive frames, with no apparent reason (meaning no clear object on which it decided to switch focus to). Other tests indicated that it sometimes fails to lock focus on a pretty "easy" subject, even in single-point mode / single-shot AF / static subject.

For the Nikon bodies, I understood that the outer AF points are slower (because they're not cross-type) but once focus has locked, it is accurate in most situations.

I do not want to do any anti-Canon propaganda. Actually, I'm really happy with my Canon gear - it has proven to be EXCELLENT value for money (and here I include body, lenses and flash). Nevertheless, as I also do weddings, I really need a reliable AF. Given the many stories about the 1D Mark 3's AF issues, I tend to believe that similar issues may be possible with the 7D, or even worse because it is lower-ranked than the 1D series. Sadly, QC these days is not what it used to be.

I am no pro photographer by any means, but I choose my gear carefully (within the boundaries of my financial possibilities) and I know how to make use of it. I have shot with Canon gear starting with a 400D and then the 40D, although I've tested many other models as well (5D, 1D/1Ds Mark III). I've also tested Nikon gear (mainly D80, but also D700) and then some Pentax, Olympus, Sony models. I have set my expectations high enough.
This is why I opened this topic - it's NOT yet another "I want to get into digital photography, which camera should I get" thread. It's coming from a man who reads and learns as much as possible before making a decision.

Hope I didn't say too much ...


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2011 6:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 12:48 pm
Posts: 8028
Location: UK
icarus86, it sounds like you know what you want, but I'm not sure anyone else could answer that exactly for you. While the 7D AF is improved from xxD, it is not perfect by any means. There are customisation options which may help in any given situation such as choosing between focus or shutter priority, rate of tracking changes and how it ignores sudden changes (or not). I've not even experimented with those myself, since I tend to shoot in varied conditions and the default is now well known and predictable in character by me. That is, I know it wont be perfect all the time, and I can quickly recognise and recover from the types of conditions that may cause it to go off. Personally I haven't noticed any issues with truly stationary subjects, and motion tracking for sure is not 100% perfect.

How well it compares against the Nikon models is outside my experience, and even for those that have extensively used both systems it would still depend on conditions and expectations. I'd therefore suggest the best way to find out is to borrow or hire the candidates and use them for real. I have to admit I've been thinking about getting a D300s to play with to see first hand if there really is any substance to the usual cross-manufacturer claims on the internet. Note although the D7000 has a great spec, I think the older D300s would still be superior if AF and continuous shooting performance is a bigger priority.

It probably is a bit too old to compare, but I also have a 1D mk1 and the AF on that is clearly inferior to the 7D for tracking wildlife, which is my main area of interest.

_________________
Canon DSLRs: 7D, 5D2, 1D, 600D, 450D full spectrum, 300D IR mod
Lenses: EF 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8, 135/2+SF, 28-80 V, 70-300L, 100-400L, TS-E 24/3.5L, MP-E 65, EF-S 15-85 IS
3rd party: Zeiss 2/50 makro, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300 f/2.8 OS, Celestron 1325/13
Tinies: Sony HX9V.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2011 3:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 7:01 am
Posts: 1167
Location: bit east of Melbourne
just curious, can you point me to the forums where you have read this, the 7D may just need a bit of setting up.

The AI Servo can be improved on by internal tweaks, there is a good guide here. I have got some great birds in flight shot, it tracks accurately.

http://www.garyluhm.net/bio/tips_0310.html

When shooting in Single shot mode, its important to turn off some of the focus areas. Typically I only have spot focus selected. When all 19 areas are active it tends to focus on the closest one, this seems to have caused many focus "issues".

The only issue I have is that with the 70-300L I need to adjust the focus microadjust to +3, otherwise it will consistently front focus. The 50 1.8 front focuses when close, but ok for further away.

_________________
Canon Powershot S95, Canon 6D,7D, Canon 40 2.8 STM, Tamron 24-70 2.8 VC, Canon 17-40 L, Canon 15-85, Canon 85 1.8, Sigma 30 1.4, 50mm 1.8, Canon 100 2.8L Macro, Canon 70-300L +Kenko 1.4 Pro 300DGX, Canon 430EX II and RS 4 Classic


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2011 9:19 am 
too many lenses,stay with Canon. 7D ftw :) enough said


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 2:04 am 
Hi icarus86,

Alternately, you could take a look at the 60D, which will focus faster than the D7000 and has a tad better low-light/high ISO handling as well.

Good luck with your choice!

Cheers :-)


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 7:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:57 am
Posts: 1551
Location: Winterpeg, Manisnowba, Canada
+1 for the 7D, it will let you keep your lens collection without having to worry about selling it or the hassle of switching systems. I can't speak for the camera itself as I've never owned one or used one very much, but I can't seem to find anything wrong with the AF system from what I've read. the full servo AF seems to be a bit less reliable than the spot AF, but it generally gets the focus spot on.

Comparing it to a D7000, it really depends on what you want. As I mentioned before, I'd still go for the 7D, but the D7000 is worth considering. It has a comparable AF system, a lighter body weight and overall better IQ. Of course, go with the Canon and you'll get a much better body build, and the ability to use your older lenses.

Good luck!

_________________
-Evan

Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
- Ansel Adams


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 12:17 pm 
Hi everyone and thanks again for all your comments !

As I see, things are pretty much in favor of the 7D, although I'm not very convinced myself.
To follow up on EvanK's post above, I value IQ, DR, weight, price and reliability much more than speed and buffer. I found myself shooting with the 40D at 1600 and 3200 ISO more often than I wanted to, and the options of 6400 and even 12800 are more than welcome. I am no noise fanatic, but I very much appreciate better DR and detail at high ISO's.

I'll continue to wait for any more opinions on this, and follow some additional reviews as well (by the way, Gordon's video review series on the D7000 were amazing !).

Cheers !


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group