Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Tue Jul 29, 2014 3:16 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:01 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9962
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi everyone, external microphones can greatly improve the sound quality of your movies. In this Sticky thread, we'd like to hear from anyone who is using an external microphone with their camera / DSLR / camcorder.

Please tell us your experiences - what camera(s) have you tried it on? What was the sound quality like compared to the built-in microphone? Tell us about the build quality and design - does it work well for you? What do you use it for - voice, music, ambience etc? Is it used indoors or out? In what ways, if any, does it disappoint?

Ultimately would you buy it again?

Note if you have any questions about specific microphones, please start a new thread. This thread is to discuss the pros and cons of the microphone you're already using.

Thanks!

Gordon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 11:23 pm 
Review of the Rode Videomic Pro as used with the Nikon D7000 DSLR

> I had the original Videomic and the sound does seem a little better than the original Videomic. However, to me it's negligible. The original Videomic was awesome and I think the Pro model has simply improved on the design and qualities of the original. You will NOT be let down with this mic. What's nice about the Pro is that you have adjustable switches right on the back for -10db, flat or +20db as well as the normal On and High Pass Filter On. The ease of adjustment is what I like about the Pro model. The original Videomic did have the High Pass Filter on the outside but the output could not be adjusted without taking the battery out. I think the output is adjusted more often than the High Pass Filter switch. I've been playing around with the mic options within the Nikon D7000 to get a feel for which combination may work best for specific situations and I like the easy of adjustment. It's quick and easy.

> One of the bad things with the Nikon D7000's internal video mic is that it picks up the sound from the autofocus motor during recording. The internal mic is horrible (and in mono) and I didn't expect much from it anyway. And if you're going to shoot some decent video, an external mic is definitely a must. I haven't been able to hear any autofocus noise on my footage when using the Pro. I tried it with 4 different Nikon lenses (35mm, 18-200mm, 17-55mm 2.8, 70-200mm 2.8) and they were all fine. In comparison, the original Videomic didn't pick up any autofocus noise either and this was with both mics in the flat setting. I didn't have to activate the high pass filter to avoid that which made me happy as I'm not a fan of the high pass filter.

> The size is a MAJOR improvement. I never had an issue where the original Videomic would appear in my shots because of its length but if I was using my 35mm 1.8 lens on my D7000, it just wouldn't look right. The Pro model has a much more appropriate look when paired with a DSLR.

> The output wire on the Pro model is very, very thin and I've read other reviews where people have said the same thing. The wire comes out of the back of the mic and then passes underneath and is tucked into a small channel. To me, it looks more like it is "jammed" into this channel. I'm careful to treat the wire lightly but I'm glad that Rode offers a nice warranty with this mic. I guess that if I got 10 years of usage out it for $229, that would be a fair deal. However, I tend to take great care of my gear so I'm hoping this mic will last well beyond 10 years for me.

> Shock system: I do like the look of the newer shock system and it seems to keep itself in place more than the original Videomic. The original model could tend to really shake from its own weight when moved around. Not enough to max out and make a sound while recording but it just didn't have much stability. On the Pro, there are 2 straps, one on each side, that suspend the mic and hold it in place. My only issue with these straps is that one or both of them will fall out of place when I remove the mic from its storage pouch. Speaking of that...the mic fits perfectly into the storage case for my Nikon SB-600 speedlight (case #SS-600) so I store it there. It must just be slightly snug enough for the mic to grab the sides during removal and it dislodges the suspension straps. It's a minor annoyance because I can easily put the straps right back on, but it's an annoyance none the less and not something that you'll want to deal with in the field. The straps seems to be REALLY soft so maybe that's why they pull out easy. On the other hand, they'll probably perform well in cold weather because even if they do stiffen from the cold, they'll still have some good damping qualities.

Overall, I think there are just 2 negatives with this mic: the very thin mic wire and how the rubber straps become dislodged from their seating. However, these are very small negatives and should not be enough for you to avoid this mic. Yes, the wire is thin but with a little care, it'll be just fine. I couldn't be happier with the sound and look of the Videomic Pro.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2011 12:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 4:52 pm
Posts: 244
Location: NB, Canada
After listening to a lot of sound samples, I decided to go for the Zoom H4n about a month ago. It's a great recorder which comes with two built-in condenser mics, and you can plug in two extra microphones in it (XLR or the smaller plugs both work).

What really makes the biggest difference for me is I can plug in a headset and listen to whatever the recorder is recording live. I've used it to record jams where you only have one shot at recording a song, so recording and praying that the sound comes out right wasn't an option for me.

The other thing I love about the H4n is I can move it anywhere. It doesn't have to stay near my camera, so I can position it closer to the source, either have someone hold it, or use a cheap camera stand.

I like the sound quality a lot, and with manual control on the input (and output) volumes, I can usually tune out some background noise and just have the main subject.

I tried it for recording my voice for some reviews and for music as well, and in both cases it seems to do a great job. I will eventually invest in some microphones to plug in it, though, as it can record 4 channels at once. A wired Lavalier would be a great cheap option, or maybe a long shotgun mic.

_________________
Cameras: Canon EOS 6D, Canon EOS Rebel T3i, Canon EOS Rebel T2i, Canon S90
Lenses: Tamron: SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD, SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD, Rokinon: 8mm Fisheye cine, Canon: EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens, 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 III, and EF 50mm f/1.8 II
Retired camera: Fujifilm Finepix s700


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2011 12:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 4:28 pm
Posts: 492
Location: Belgium
I was just wondering if anyone else could share their opinions on the external microphones they purchased :) ? I intend to get a video-capable DSLRs in the (very) near future - be it Sony's upcoming A77, or their A580.

I've been looking at Rode Mic's VideoMic Pro but the shock mount and all that looks a bit *cough* flimsy to say the least :?. Also looked at Sony's very own ECM-CG50...

Did find a store in my area where they have the VideoMic Pro fortunately, so I could go and try it out if I'd want to. They would have to order the windsock for it though...

_________________
Sony α77V/VG-C77AM/α350/18-70/70-400 G SSM/NEX-5/18-55 OSS/Lowepro Pro Trekker 600 AW/CompuTrekker AW/Nova 140 AW/Street & Field gear/Toploader Pro 75 AW. And a huge wishlist...

My photos on Flickr...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2011 9:21 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9962
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
I plan to do a comparison between the Rode VMP and SVM in the near future.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2011 6:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 4:28 pm
Posts: 492
Location: Belgium
Looking forward to it, Gordon *thumbs up* :D!

_________________
Sony α77V/VG-C77AM/α350/18-70/70-400 G SSM/NEX-5/18-55 OSS/Lowepro Pro Trekker 600 AW/CompuTrekker AW/Nova 140 AW/Street & Field gear/Toploader Pro 75 AW. And a huge wishlist...

My photos on Flickr...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Lapel Mic
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:46 pm 
I think I'm after a lapel mic but dont know :S

I'm using a 550D and want to 'present' to the camera. The distance could well vary and often I'll be on my own so booming a mic isnt an option.

What wireless options are there? I'll be out and about so a compact battery operated system is needed

Answers on a postcard please

Ian


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 9:44 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9962
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Ian, yes ideally you'll want a lapel or 'lavalier' microphone. I should really use one, but instead tend to use shotguns like the Rode VMP and make sure they're close to me and I'm shouting if there's lots of ambient noise!

I can't recommend a lapel mic though as I haven't used many.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 5:42 pm 
My search for a wireless lapel or lavelier mic has been continuing and today I've had a bit of a break through.

First of all I found this product from Sony

Image

ECM-AW3 Bluetooth® wireless microphone for recording devices with microphone in jacks

http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&productId=8198552921665908004&tab=featuresTab

Unfortunately its discontinued but a web search showed there still seems to be stock around.

In looking around youtube for reviews of the Sony mics I came across this youtube video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IzSuTPKG57Q&feature=related

Well that had me thinking. I knew it was possible to record sound onto an ipod and I've got plenty of old blackberry headsets kicking around I just needed to find out how to make it work.

Well it turns out it couldnt be simpler. The software is built into the newer generation of ipods. I have a 5th Generation Classic 160Gb and one of the new 6th Generation 16Gb Nano's with the touch screen.

I 've taken an old blackberry headset and chopped off the headphones. When I plu it into either of the ipods the "Voice Memo" option appears and its easy as an easy thing. The touch screen Nano even has a nice neat sound level indicator. With the Classic your flying blind really.

Sound recording quality is pretty damn good at 16-bit at 44kHz and only really limited by the quality of the mic.

So from what I can see (I havent tested yet) these are my conclusions

The Sony option offers a pretty cost effective and simple way of recording into the camera. Because its straight into the camera there is a lot less post production faff. It will also be pretty easy to check for quality. With a bit of messing around its possible to rig monitor headphones up to the camera so its checked as you go along plus the sound will also be checked when video is played back in camera.

The actual mic unit is pretty big and would be difficult to conceal and the battery life is limited.

The sound in the Canon cameras is seriously affected by the Automatic Gain Control (means you have a significant hiss as when the sound levels are low as the camera automatically turns up the recording 'volume'). If you have the option its definitely worth installing Magic Lantern to solve this.

The Ipod and chopped mobile phone headset is the ghetto option. Its costing me nothing to try. I've done some initial audio tests and the sound quality seems pretty good to my ignorant ears.

Its an incredibly flexible system, there are no distance to camera limits and the number of sound tracks you could record is limited to the number of ipods and mics you could scrounge. The input into the ipod needs to be via the three way 3.5mm headset jack as used on many mobile phones inc Blackberry and Iphone. With a trip to Maplins and some soldering iron nouse I'm sure it wouldnt be hard to knock up a couple of adaptors for any mic to be plugged into an ipod.

This system doesnt require sound input jacks into the camera and side steps the problems with the AGC in the Canon cameras

To make the sound useable needs some discipline though. Probably worth using a clapper board and probably worth using a note book. I'd worry about the ipods turning themselves off inbetween shots so you'd need to be very disciplined and organised to make it work.

Post production is also more complicated as you need to sync the sound recordings to the video. To do this you need software that allows multiple tracks to be added. (Wax is free and does the job pretty well once your used to it)

I'll sort out a test video of the ghetto system and post it soon

Ian


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2011 3:05 am 
Im using now the Tascam DR-07 MKii. Its small enough to carry with my camera bag, and as a professional features. High Def sound recording, stereo modes, mp3 or Wav recording, and sound monitoring during video recording. Im very happy with it and offers an very proffessional results.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:05 pm
Posts: 2
I'm thinking of getting the snowball microphone by blue... i heard it was good. at the risk of sounding like a complete neewbie (i been making beats without knowing the tech stuff) whats asio4all?

Ableton says i use a coredriver, which i guess is for MACs only right?


Last edited by Quatar on Thu Jan 10, 2013 6:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2012 11:11 am 
I use Sony microphone. because its best and very comfortable and sound is mind bowling.


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:40 am 
I’ve got a Samsung from my friend, but not sure on the model.


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 6:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:20 pm
Posts: 6
Location: somewhere in the planet
I use azden ecz-990 because my panasonic hdc-tm700 has a fan noise when you shot in silent room ;)

I think i need wireless microphone to do some short films 8)

_________________
Canon EOS 1D Mark III
Canon EOS 60D
Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II
Canon EF 70-300mm F4-5.6 IS USM
Canon EF 400mm F5.6 L USM
Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 DC HSM
Raynox DCR-250
Canon Speedlite 580EX II
Panasonic HDC-TM700 For Video Work
------------------------------------------------------------
My Flickr


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2012 9:30 am
Posts: 14
Still coming to grips with the Zoom H2n but so far so good.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group