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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2011 9:51 pm 
Hello,

I've came across this site on youtube, I've been watching a few reviews on some cameras and they are really nicely done with a lot of information. However I'm not up to speed with the technical specs of cameras and came to here for some advice.

I'm new, so I don't want anything that is going to burn a large hole in my pocket, I am on an "unknown" budget. I'm basically wanting it for taking pictures of wildlife and scenery mostly. I guess that would require distance shots so what lenses would be required ect.

I've been told good things about the Canon EOS 550D for beginners and seen some really nice sample shots from someone that owns one.

If anyone could give me a range of possible recommendations would be really helpful.

Thanks in advance for anyone that gives me some help!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2011 11:22 pm 
One thing you should keep in mind - people take pictures, not cameras. Even the best camera in bad hands won't guarantee good pictures, while a low-end camera in experienced hands will produce excellent results.

Any of the current crop of entry-level DSLRs will suit you fine as a first camera. For standard landscape, you can get by just fine with a prime lens - or even the kit short-range zoom lens that comes bundled with the camera. You can grow your lens collection over time.

You may want to consider enrolling in a beginner's photography class.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2011 11:39 pm 
jwnrw
Thanks for your helpful information.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:11 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:57 am
Posts: 1551
Location: Winterpeg, Manisnowba, Canada
Agreed with the fact that your camera won't make you a better photographer, a good example would be this video.

You may want to consider a camera such as Nikon's new D5100 (It hasn't been announced quite yet, but stay tuned as Nikon's scheduled a press release for tomorrow when it will be announced), but as jwnrw mentioned, really any entry level DSLR will suit you well, as long as you have a good lens to mount with it.

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-Evan

Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
- Ansel Adams


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:34 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:52 pm
Posts: 2175
Location: The Netherlands
It could also interesting to find out which brand is the cheapest in your country. I really liked Nikon and Sony, but especially the lenses of Canon are quite a bit cheaper, plus the older Canons are way better than old Nikons, when talking about noise.
That's why I went Canon.

Dont you have friends with DSLR cameras?

_________________
Ruben

Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 10:37 am 
Quote:
Dont you have friends with DSLR cameras?


Not really which is unfortunate.

Quote:
good example would be this video.


That is a very good video. Even though she did do well after she worked out how to use it, sort of lol.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:05 pm 
Haha I wonder who doesn't watch DigitalRev on this forum..

Back on topic, I own the 550D myself and I find it to be a verry easy camera. Especially compared to the 40D (I know someone who has this camera) because al the setting are displayed on the screen at the back, wich is bigger. But it might be a better idea to go for a body like a used 500D, and then spend more money on lenses.. if ISO performance (low light noise performace) isen't that important to you. It's propably better to go with a cheaper body and better lenses.

And don't forget to look at all brands and not just the big ones like Nikon, Canon,..

Good luck choosing your camera.. I know how you feel.. When you see the description of a lens and have completely no idea what all the numbers mean xD


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 7:25 pm 
Matz45
Ha, thanks for reply. Yeah it is a bit tricky to understand all the little bits, I'd have no clue if I had to go and buy a lense, or even the camera. I sat and watched a few videos from that youtube channel, was helpful but then again made it even harder to choose.

I do like the sound of the 550D it has that extra feature of recording in 1080p 30fps which is very beneficial to me as I film as well. But apart from that it seems to have a bit more reason to upgrade due to spec differences over the 500D, apart from the price ofc.

Still the search goes on. I will take a look at other makes and see what I find, but I would rather go with a well known company.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 7:55 pm 
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Posts: 820
Location: Boca Raton, FL, USA
No problem on the 'well known company' bit - there are really only 5 players in large-sensor DSLR or DSLR type cameras, and all 5 are pretty well known and rooted in camera history - Canon, Nikon, Sony (Minolta), Pentax, and Olympus. You won't really find a bad one in the bunch.

Remember too that digital cameras have more in common nowadays than you might think. For example, you might buy a Nikon DSLR with a 16MP APS-C sensor...and not even realize that very same sensor is actually manufactured by Sony and the same sensor is available in a Sony and a Pentax DSLR. Or you may buy a Sony or Pentax camera, and it comes with a lens labeled 'Sony' or 'Pentax', but the lens is actually manufactured by Tokina or Tamron.

They're all so close in performance, specifications, features, and prices across various model ranges that on a list of 100 most important things to consider when buying a new camera, brand name should fall at #100. There are 99 other things worth considering first...one of the most important is ergonomics - how does the camera feel and fit in your hands? Availability is a big factor for some International buyers in some countries where some brands or models simply aren't supported. Lenses, ISO performance, burst speeds, stabilization types, video capability, live view functionality, lens compatibility and availability, specific control or feature needs, sale prices, and so on...all factors to consider.

Believe it or not, as excellent as many Canon or Nikon models may be, for some people's needs or wants, another brand might actually be the far better choice for them. Want to use old manual focus lenses? Pentax is backwards compatible and requires no adapters for any of their lenses going back 40 years+. Want live view that works exactly the same as it does on a P&S camera or without losing any performance at all over the viewfinder? Only Sony makes such a camera. Looking for something much smaller and lighter than typical DSLRs? Sony's A33/55, Olympus' PEN series mirrorless, Pentax's KX are all quite small and very well featured compared to larger DSLRs.

The advice can be heeded or not - but it's best to consider all available brands when shopping and truly get a proper and fair view of what's out there - in order to really make sure you're finding the right camera for you. The only person that loses out if you don't is you. In the end, once you've seen what's out there, and weighed all the features, designs, and prices, then you'll know that the Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, or Olympus you chose was definitely the best fit for your needs.

_________________
Justin Miller
Sony DSLR-A580 / Sony 18-250mm / Minolta 50mm F1.7 / Sigma 30mm F1.4 / Tamron 10-24mm / Tamron 150-600mm / Tamron 90mm F2.8 macro / Minolta 300mm F4 APO
Sony A6000 / 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 / 55-210mm F4-6.3 / 10-18mm F4 / 35mm F1.8 / 16mm F2.8 / via manual adapter, lots of Pentax K mount, Konica K/AR mount, and Leica M mount manual lenses

Galleries:
http://www.pbase.com/zackiedawg


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 9:14 pm 
zackiedawg

Thanks for your reply.

I still find it hard to choose as all the lenses and extra bits just confuses me more.

Would it be possible for people to give me a few recommendations of DSLRs and lenses? Within a reasonable price range ofc as I don't want to go for the extreme.

Thanks


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 10:58 pm 
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Posts: 820
Location: Boca Raton, FL, USA
Of course, without knowing a true budget cap or what your specific shooting style needs might be, I'll start off somewhat generically - the best cameras I feel are available in the $1,000 price range, as a kit including 1-2 basic lenses, and have the best overall combination of overall image quality, speed, accuracy, features, high ISO capability, etc.

The Sony A580 are probably right at or very near the top of the list, due to the excellent sensor shared with the Nikon D7000 and Pentax K5 - both of which are much more expensive cameras. Also worthwhile are the A560 and A550 (an older model you can find for $600ish or less).

The Pentax KR is a solid camera, chock full of features, for a very competitive price, and well worth a look - also for the slightly older model KX which is a screaming bargain at around $500.

Nikon and Canon are tougher for me on recommendations, because though I feel they certainly make competitive and excellent cameras, their better cameras tend to be a bit pricier.

The Nikon D3100 is decent, though has a few limitations like no lens motor in the camera body - still, performance is solid and features are good, and lens availability is very strong. If it can be found, a D90 might actually be a better pick - it's a better camera body and has better features. The D7000 is excellent, but a big step up in price range, closer to $2,000.

The Canon T3 seems promising - the T2 that came before it was a solid performer, if a bit slow for sports/action...the T3 is a bit of an evolution rather than a big wholesale change. The 60D is a very nice camera, great build, features, speed, high ISO - but again, you're moving up a notch on the price scale.

If you can give some idea of what styles of shooting are important to you, what price cap you'd prefer to stay under, and what features might be crucial for you, we might be able to hone the list down a little better. I'd say overall low price winner would be the Pentax KX or Sony A500 - as far as getting a nice camera for minimal money.

I'd probably have to call the Sony A580 the most performance for the best price overall - the top sensor in the biz, shared by cameras twice its price, usable high ISOs well up over 6400 (goes to 25,600), 5 frames per second burst with a 7-frame speed mode, fast and accurate focus, in-body stability system, hands-down best live view system ever, with no performance degredation or difference whether shooting with the viewfinder or LCD, tilting hi-res LCD, battery goes forever and includes a time-remaining readout, and special features like built-in automatic stacking HDR and multi-stack high ISO modes.

_________________
Justin Miller
Sony DSLR-A580 / Sony 18-250mm / Minolta 50mm F1.7 / Sigma 30mm F1.4 / Tamron 10-24mm / Tamron 150-600mm / Tamron 90mm F2.8 macro / Minolta 300mm F4 APO
Sony A6000 / 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 / 55-210mm F4-6.3 / 10-18mm F4 / 35mm F1.8 / 16mm F2.8 / via manual adapter, lots of Pentax K mount, Konica K/AR mount, and Leica M mount manual lenses

Galleries:
http://www.pbase.com/zackiedawg


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 11:47 pm 
zackiedawg

Thanks for reply.

I'd be using it mostly for taking general landscapes, wildlife and also some sports so people running around a bit and hopefully be able to get some nice close ups.

The budget would be around the $800 or (£500 GBP in my currency) mark. That would be pushing it as I really didn't want to be spending as much as that since I'm new to it so I'd say that's a maximum.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 1:18 am 
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Location: United Kingdom
For that budget, there's no shortage of entry level DSLRs you can look at.

Canon EOS 1000D
Canon EOS 1100D
Nikon D3100
Pentax K-r
Pentax K-x
Sony a290
Sony a390
Sony a33

You might be able to find special deals for the Canon EOS 500D or the Nikon D5000 within the budget too.

To take photos of landscapes, wildlife and sports within your budget would probably call for a general purpose lens with a long zoom i.e. 18-135mm or 18-200mm since the landscapes would need a short focal length to capture a large area and the wildlife/sports would need a long focal length to focus on a small area or individual subject. You ought to be able to find most of the above models bundled with such a lens either in a kit from the manufacturer or as a special deal from the retailer.

Not being a fanboy, I won't get on my soapbox and tell you one brand is better or worse than another. The best camera is the one you feel most comfortable holding - any self respecting retailer should let you hold and try the camera before you decide whether to buy or not - because it'll most likely be the camera you'll use most, making the most of your investment.

_________________
DSLRs: Canon EOS 70D, 30D
Lenses: Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM, EF 50mm f/1.8 II, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM

CSCs: Panasonic DMC-GF3
Lenses: Panasonic Lumix G 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 2:52 am 
Rorschach

Thanks for the reply.

I've been looking at packages for the Canon 550D.

I found this one.
http://tiny.cc/mah0r

I also viewed this review on the lenses.
http://tiny.cc/si3g7
He explains it very nicely and judges them toward the other brand lenses. So I know I won't be expecting the best but good enough quality for me I would assume.

There is also the same package that comes with the Canon lenses 18-55mm and 75-300mm. It costs a bit more but would it be worth it?
http://tiny.cc/rtw3e

Would like to know what you guys think for the price as it seems to come with quite a bit.

I know it's a little out of my budget, but I'd consider paying it if it's worth it.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 6:52 am 
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Location: United Kingdom
I've had a 550D for about six months and I'm delighted with it.

Provided that you can still afford to eat, only you can answer whether paying more would be worth it. If you use the camera often, the chances are the answer would be yes.

As that eBay page lists the US model of the 550D, I would very carefully check with the seller who the warranty is supplied by as well as the terms and conditions of it. The warranty for Canon DSLR bodies is usually only valid in the region where they were officially distributed i.e. the Rebel T2i, as it's known in North America may not be covered by manufacturer warranty in the UK.

_________________
DSLRs: Canon EOS 70D, 30D
Lenses: Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM, EF 50mm f/1.8 II, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM

CSCs: Panasonic DMC-GF3
Lenses: Panasonic Lumix G 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6


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