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 Post subject: Newbie question
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 5:03 am 
First I want to say hello and share how much I have learned from the tutorials on here, Gordon does a great job explaing all the details in a way that is very understandable.
I just recieved my canon rebel and I have watched all the videos shared on here...I have not seen or heard any mention of the (white balance) WB button on this camera..what exactly is it for and when do i need to use it?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 9:42 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 2:52 pm
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Location: Scotland
For a technical explanation of white balance you can read this wiki article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_balance

A less technical explanation of white balance is, settings that will try to correct colours depending upon the ambient lighting. For example a sheet of white paper will look different when lit by a filament light bulb, fluorescent lighting or natural sunlight. So most cameras have white balance settings for these different situations (or an auto setting so you don't have to worry about it).

If you shoot in RAW and not JPEG you have more options to modify the colour temperature (white balance) in post processing.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 8:41 pm 
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Welcome Nancy - keystrokeUK has exlained it perfectly!

I'd use Auto WB most of the time, but when the results aren't coming out right or you fancy experimenting, I'd also recommend shooting in RAW, as this lets you choose the WB setting after the event on your computer.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 10:18 pm 
Auto WB is the correct answer for 99% of people I'd say. Personally, unless I'm shooting indoors, I always have mine set to cloudy as I like my images a little warmer.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 11:03 pm 
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Auto WB is good for most situations, but it gets fooled it there is a lot of green in a scene, like a sunny day outside. You should set the white balance to daylight in those situations. Also in many indoor situations the auto WB makes the images too warm, but I haven't found much help in the presets here. I shoot RAW so I just correct it in PP anyway

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