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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 10:58 am 
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I currently have a 500D, and are reluctant to use the viewfinder because of it's 95% coverage. (Yes, that is irrellevant to the sensor size)

Another concern is that if I use full frame lenses, when I do eventually get a full frame, the lenses will react differently due to the crop factor.

I am wondering whether a grip would be benificial or not.

When I bought the camera, I fitted the strap and used it for the first 5 months or so, then later decided that it got in the way too much, so decided to remove it. I find it more convinient without. This may depend on the camera size though.

The screen doesn't pivot, so for conducting low down shots of animals/macro or whatever, I have to bend down with the camera, which can of course become uncomfortable at times.

I have a wired and wireless (infra red) remote triggers, but not a "professional" tripod yet. As my tripod was orignally intended just for point and shoot cameras, and camcorders, the DSLR fits on there, but I would much prefer a pro one, like a carbon fibre.

Any thoughts on the above?

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 11:10 am 
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It's like you use the DSLR as a P&S. I dont say you do, but it's like.
About the viewfinder, it isnt that a big problem as most viewfinder have 95% cov.
Things you dont want on the picture which have come on the picture because of the 95% cov, you can simply remove them by cropping.

About the grip. Well, it adds much weight to the camera, and is only needed when you shoot a lot of portraits, or just want a bigger camera.

cheers

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Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 6:19 pm 
Canon_500D - I just read your post, and was immediately struck with the most intense admiration for your skills....

That is, I instantly imagined you in the grandstand at a sports game, one of those superb white long-range Canon-L 600mm lenses, about a metre / 40" - long, on your camera - holding it at arm's length, busily snapping perfect images of the on-field action, via the "P&S-LCD method".....

To do that, you'd need the pricier Canon lenses, with anti-shake in the lens, as the Canon DSLRs don't have it in the body, and perhaps you're an Advanced practitioner of some Exotic form of Yoga, etc - to install anti-shake in yourself....

Amazing! At my advanced age - I'm 62 - I can't even do that with a bridge-zoom - whether the viewfinder "only" has 95% coverage, or not!

As they say - one "lives and learns" - your post has been most educational, and I'm quite overcome with admiration for your abilities...! 8)

Dave.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 6:42 pm 
I think you are focusing too much into irrelevant things like viewfinder coverage and stuff like that. Just forget about it, go outside, and shoot. The only way to learn about photography is through experience


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 6:51 pm 
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There are very few cameras that have 100% coverage... Not even the full-frame 5D mkII has 100% coverage. The 7D has 100%, but having used both a 7D and my 450D the main difference between viewfinders to me was just that the autofocus points weren't always visible in the 7D, that's it. Very rarely do I worry about the "missing" 5% and if something unneeded creeps into my photo I can, as suggested, just crop it or clone it out if I need to. You hadn't composed the shot with it visible in the first place so that part of the frame isn't essential to your photograph, therefore you can remove it without losing anything.

Obviously the type of shooting you do doesn't require much in terms of fast auto-focusing or continuous subject tracking so your usage of LiveView seems to work for you, but in that line of thought, why did you buy a DSLR and not a top-end bridge camera? You can get relatively similar image quality, shooting in RAW, etc from something like the G-series from Canon...

Anyways, not the point of this thread. Your camera, you use it the way you like.

Grips, as mentioned, make portrait shooting a lot easier and can extend your battery life (important if you're using LiveView all the time) and can help balance heavier lenses on the body. You can still mount your camera to a tripod since the grips will have a screw thread on the bottom.

I can only give you some heresay advice, but I know a lot of people swear by Manfrotto, and having borrowed my friend's for a day it was certainly a huge amount better than my current tripod. Then again, it's old enough to have been manufactured in West Germany so...

I do know that having a good tripod is only have the battle... it's the tripod head that will cost you to get a really high-quality one if that's what you're after. Bigger lenses (supertele's) need Gimbal-type heads, whereas a lot of stuff can be done with ballheads if you've got the funds.

Good luck!

Edit - Also, seconding what Timmy says. Get off the Internets and go take pictures. You'll learn as time goes by what you need and don't need, rather than simply asking strangers on an internet forum who have no idea what you shoot because you never post photos...

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 7:59 pm 
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My D90 doesn't have 100% coverage either, but my D2H does. You kind of get used to it, depending on the viewfinder you look through.

I like camera grips, because I have big hands. Sometimes, even my brick-like D2H feels "small". A grip does balance the camera out a bit, it makes it heavier, which means it vibrates/swings around less.

CF tripod? Meh, unless you plan on long hikes or shoot in the snow, an aluminum might be a better option. I bought a CF tripod anyhow, because I just love the material. I'm a geek like that.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 11:39 pm 
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Interesting advice there. Some more sensible than others.

I have posted photos up before.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 3:40 pm 
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Viewfinder Thread

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 4:15 pm 
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I didn't see this earlier but...

95% viewfinder - as Ruben says just do the slight crop to the output if you find it that annoying. You can calibrate it yourself and crop the same segment every time. Personally I actually miss the "uncrop" as at times I wish I have got a bit more than I saw.

Full Frame - don't worry about lenses for FF until you're within realistic range of getting a FF body. While they will behave a bit different, you will adapt.

Grip - know what one does then decide if you need it or not. To me the biggest point is possibly more comfortable portrait shooting. Lesser reasons are weight distribution, possibility of extended battery life and alternate batter sources (AA), and finally, because it looks good! Negatives include bulk and weight.

Strap - depends on your usage. When I only had small lenses, I also didn't use a strap for the increased freedom of motion. As lenses get bigger, the strap will come in handy taking the weight off your arms at times. Also invaluable once you start using multiple cameras at the same time. Consider a detachable strap system like the Cameralabs one for example.

Fixed screen/low angles - I have that problem too. The angle finder you put in the other thread is one partial solution. I think the flip screen is the best for me. External displays are a possibility, but they're not cheap and I'd rather put that towards a body.

Tripod - if your current one is stable and easy enough to set up, might as well keep using it. The only problem I found with budget tripods is the head might not take the weight of a SLR+big lens and slip. Thicker legs can add more stability and the joint system might be quicker/easier depending on the system. Also more choice of heads.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 4:34 pm 
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Interesting response popo :D

If money is no object, then the remote live views look good, but then the shoe is not free for other devices like flash syncronisation.

I think as the camera is only a 500D, the strap is probably not really required anyway for personal use using one camera.

I find that the non professional tripods that can purchase for £20 or so do not have seperate legs. The legs all move together, and will not open right out wide, which is crucial for low down shots.

I can not really understand why the grips are so expensive. I would get the genuine Canon one if I was to get one. I think it could be benificial, but they only fit that range of cameras, so I could not use it on a body from another range.

The right angled viewfinders are going on ebay, but I am not sure whether it pivots or not, without checking.

I may look into the detatchable straps, but I think the current rig does not require one.

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