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PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:22 pm 
By this I mean what mode of settings and what lens do you find the best to take pictures outdoors on cloudy snowy days? If you have pictures of objects in the snow that you have taken, please post with settings


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:52 pm
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Location: The Netherlands
I always try the settings, how can we know what settings you have to use? It's always different to me. I use ISO 200 in winter outside though.

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Ruben

Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:43 pm 
What mode and aperture? I understand what you mean, I was just after base settings


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:48 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:52 pm
Posts: 2177
Location: The Netherlands
That's all what you want to use! Really. Some people just use their camera on fully Auto, if you ask us such questions I guess youre sort of beginner. Set the camera to P, ISO 200 and check every picture if it isnt too dark or too light, many metering systems get fooled by that white snow!

Cheers

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Ruben

Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:11 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 12:59 pm
Posts: 6009
Location: The Netherlands
Ruben is right, if you're asking this question, I'd recommend just going out there, setting your ISO to 100 or 200, and playing around with the exposure compensation. Chances are you'll have to kcik it up to +1 or even higher to prevent the snow from coming out grey. :)

Image

Shutter Speed:1/500 second
Aperture:F/4.0
Focal Length:10 mm
ISO Speed:200

Image

Shutter Speed:1/400 second
Aperture:F/5.6
Focal Length:10 mm
ISO Speed:200

Image

Shutter Speed:1/160 second
Aperture:F/8.0
Focal Length:10 mm
ISO Speed:200

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 4:53 pm 
Thanks Citrus...what shooting mode did you take those pics in and what lens especially for the last pic?


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 6:47 pm 
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Location: The Netherlands
I shot in Aperture priority I think, and used a fisheye lens (a real fisheye lens, not one of those adapters)

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 1:09 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2009 2:03 am
Posts: 1463
Location: Gold Coast Australia
@syndicate1, Citruspers posted a good example here for you with the shooting data. If you notice the aperture is getting on the large size for these conditions and the speed is determined by the camera in aperture mode. The +EV mentioned will highlight the front section of the shot. If the speed is to slow in the conditions you can up the ISO or let the camera decide and read Ruben's comment about ISO.

You have a setting base line from Citruspers to experiment a bit, try different apertures and various +EV levels and I suggest you look at the forums tutorials on making photos lighter or darker.

Have Fun,

Cheers

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 7:04 pm 
if you are shooting high contrast seens, good chance your camera will metre the snow down to a grey. If you shoot a paticular subject in the seen that has high shadow detail and use spot metering you might get a better over all image. best bet is to to find the dynamic range of your metre, this will give you a good idea if your camera favours the shadows or highlights then you can EV accordingly. When you know this all light situations will be easier to know what your camera is going to do.


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