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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2006 8:52 am 
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Hi,

Sorry for the multiple threads, but I though it was probably better to stick this one in a new thread.

As you can see from my other thread, I'm on the verge of getting into the D-SLR arena. However, I really have no clue what lenses to go for if I were to invest in a 350D or 400D.

I currently take lots of candid and portrait-type shots as well as wide(ish) angle landscape scenery shots (with my digial compact). I have done a little bit of 'macro' work (as much as you can with a compact!), but this isn't really high on my list of things to do at the moment.

I see you can get the 350/400 bundled with a 18-55mm lens (I know the quality isn't probably high up there, but it's reasonably cheap!), but what other lenses would people recommend adding to this (or supplementing it with) to start things off? Bearing in mind that I don't have a large amount of money to throw into this at the early stages (as I'll be buying the camera as well)!

Thanks

Rhyan


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2006 10:59 am 
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Hi Rhyan, welcome to the forums...

I could try and persuade you to go for the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 for portrait work, the EF-S 17-85 as a more up-market general purpose, the Sigma or Tamron 18-200 as a budget all-rounder, or a Canon EF in case you're considering going full-frame in the future...

But if this is your first DSLR I'd say use the kit lens for a few weeks and see where it lets you down - if at all. You might find you want something wider or longer than you thought. Or maybe something which focuses closer, faster or works better in low light. You really won't know until you've worked out where a certain lens just isn't working out for you.

What I can say is while it's budget lens, the EF-S 18-55mm is a great starter and I've found it's surprisingly effective. Also, not having a massive focal range from day-one makes you think about actually getting closer or standing further back to achieve the results you want rather than standing still and turning the zoom ring.

Well that's my belief anyway! In the meantime, have a look at our reviews of the lenses mentioned above on Cameralabs and check out what they're capable of - and not. The Gallery shots should hopefully give you some ideas about what's possible.

There's certainly some fantastic optics out there, but I'd definitely recommend playing with the kit lens first.

Gordon


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2006 12:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 12:37 pm
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Thanks for the reply: most helpful!

I suppose it makes sense seeing what the camera can do before spending a load of money on lenses I may not need.

In that case, I'm tempted instead to invest in a telephoto lens at the same time (or soon after), which I'm likely to use as well as the bog-standard 18-55. I as often want to take long(ish) shots of my wife when she's running in marathon/half marathon races. It's not always easy to get close up to the runners at these sort of events :)

Are you planning on doing some Canon telephoto lens reviews at some stage (something longer than 100mm at least!)? I must admit, your lens reviews are excellent - it's great to have detailed write-ups of vital accessories. Other places/magazines seem to lack in this area.

Do you have any experience of the EOS 55-200mm U f/4.5-5.6 USM II or the EOS 75-300mm III USM f/4.0-5.6 (or the EF model)? (Just picking off some random models in the <£500 category!)

Thanks again,

Rhyan


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2006 8:57 pm 
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Hi Rhyan, as it happens I have tested the most recent EF 70-300 and compared it against some of the pricier Canon models for a future review.

The 70-300 represents great value for money, but may not focus quickly enough for the sports applications you have in mind. I'd suggest you go into a store, ask them to fit the lens on a 350D or 400D, switch the AF mode to AI Servo, then step outside the shop and see if it can track someone running towards or past you. If it's good enough, then go for it. If it's not keeping up, you'll need to spend more.

Maybe something like the EF 70-200 f4L (note since the new IS version has been announced you might find a bargain on the older non-IS version)...

Gordon


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