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 Post subject: How to prevent this
PostPosted: Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:31 am 
First---I'm saving up for a Rebel but in the meantime I figured I'd keep tinkering with the "other" settings on my p & s. I've done this more for indoor shots but wanted to throw this pic out here and get some quick feedback.

This pic was before our snow came today so the sky was whitish/gray.

I was in Av mode and tried some different shots but realized it was 20+F outside with no gloves and hungry kids so didn't stick around to try the shot in automatic to see what happened with the settings to compare.

If I were to try a shot like this again in similar conditions, what can I do sharpen it up (I know how to "fix" it in PP, but looking at getting it right on the front end). Tree & squirrel more washed out than should be. Again, given the restraints of a P&S, suggestions would be welcome to give me a starting point to try again.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b154/ ... g_7182.jpg

Canon PowerShot A570 IS
F-stop f/5.5
Exposure 1/125 sec
ISO 200
Exp. Bias +2
Foc. Length 23mm
Max App. 4.90625
Meter. Mode Pattern
Flash Off
White Balance Manual

(Is there a way to easily grab the EXIF data rather than having to type it--wasn't sure if it was available through the link I gave or not)

Thanks!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:17 am 
It seems to me that the shot is too bright. (I may make suggestions which are not possible with your camera, so see what works and what does not.)

So let's, look at all of the settings which are making it a bright shot.
* You have the ISO set to 200, you could bring it down to 100.
* You have the exposure compensation set to +2, you could bring that back down to 0, or if the shot is way too bright, bring it to -1.
* Your aperture is f/5.5, so you can increase the number, which decreases the amount of light let in. For example, f/5.5 is brighter than f/8.
* The shutter speed is set automatically in Av mode, but if you switched to Tv/S you could increase the speed to decrease the light let in.

Shooting up at animals in trees against a bright light is always challenging. You can also try using your flash combined with some of the above ideas. That way your subject doesn't get too dark while you are darkening the sky.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:13 pm 
Quote:
It seems to me that the shot is too bright. (I may make suggestions which are not possible with your camera, so see what works and what does not.)


I should be able to play with all those ideas. Thanks.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2011 6:19 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:57 am
Posts: 1551
Location: Winterpeg, Manisnowba, Canada
Hello Myst!

I personally think that the biggest problem is that your exposure compensation is at +2, as Jenny mentioned you should bring it down to 0 or perhaps -1. If it was set to a higher value so that the subject would be properly exposed and the background wouldn't blow it out, you could consider using a flash so that both the background and the subject would be properly exposed, although sometimes it can scare the animals.

_________________
-Evan

Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
- Ansel Adams


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2011 4:09 pm 
Quote:
the biggest problem is that your exposure compensation is at +2


I actually had accidentally left it at +2 as that was a previous setting from some indoor pictures. It was just too cold out with no gloves to try again at the time when I noticed it.

I'll start with that then.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:21 pm 
f5.5 @ 23mm is just about as open as it can be on a P&S. these two already lets plenty of light in. then you have the positive exposure compensation which lets even more light "in" on the shot.

a neutral EV would be a good starting point; slow down the ISO, speed up the shutter. change one setting at a time and see which shot gives you the one you're looking for.


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