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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:13 am 
Can someone explain the basic settings needed to take pictures of water Falls that give the water that sliky look . I really like that effect and would like to try it out. Thank you...D :roll:


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2008 6:32 am 
take a look at this video tour HERE from DSLR TIPS
It is a good step by step how to.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 10:08 pm 
Something that Gordon didn't fit into his workshop is the use of an ND filter. A complete ND (not a grad) allows you to shoot at a longer shutter speed and not overexpose the shot. But the essence of capturing "silky" water flow is with a long shutter speed. A sturdy tripod is essential.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 10:26 pm 
Quickly -tripod, F22 in aperture priority should do it. If it's a really bright day, or you want to increase the aperture, then start putting on the ND filters. Basically, it's the length of time the shutter is open that gives the silky effect - the longer the smoother, the shorter the sharper!


Last edited by Pete_VN52 on Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 11:13 pm 
At f22, you do limit how you play with your DOF, though it works perfectly well and will be pin sharp - however some lenses do show some CA at this small size of aperture. The workshop Gordon has is the way to learn the concept behind how to blur water - I personally shoot manual and alter my shutter speed to get the right amount of smoothness with the water, and then the aperture to play with the DOF. An ND is almost essential in bright conditions so I don't overexpose the shot.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:06 pm 
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Yep, you're dead right about using an ND filter - sometimes the scene is so bright that even at, say, f22 and the lowest ISO, you still can't get a long enough shutter speed to effectively blur the water. And of course there may be times when you don't want the other optical effects of working at big f-numbers.

I intended to mention this on the workshop, and will add it at the bottom. Thanks for reminding me!

PS - remember a polariser can also do a similar darkening job to an ND filter...


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:26 am 
It's a good workshop you have there, Gordon, but the mentioning of ND filters, or a turned-off CPL would definitely add to the armoury of knowing how to blur water. I'm glad you'll be adding that on soon.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:19 am 
A question for Photoj and anyone else who would like to comment....I noticed you have the Sigma 10-20mm and wondered if you had found a suitable CPL for it? I want to get one, but then read that they're no good for ultra-wide angle lens. I'd really like one, not just for the sky and clouds, but for taking the reflection off of ponds, streams and leaves etc when they're wet.

Any advice?
Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:16 am 
I don't actually use a CPL for the 10-20mm. The only filter I have on it is a Hoya Pro1 UV. I have tried the Pro1 CPL and that works without vignetting, as well as Sigma's own slim filters, which you'll find here: http://www.sigma-imaging-uk.com/accessories/filters.htm

The reason why I don't use a CPL with this lens is rather technical, and I get the impression you've read about this. A CPL doesn't work particularly well beyond 14mm; the light entering the edges of the lens beyond 14mm will be less than in the middle of the lens so you achieve an uneven polarisation. I've invested in the Cokin P filter system so all my filters work on the different thread sizes that I have, and I have a CPL for that. For the 10-20 you'll need the wide angle holder. More info is here:
http://www.cokin.com/ico6-WIDE-ANGLE-HOLDER.htm

Hope this helps, ChinaMark.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:06 am 
Yeah, cheers for that. Actually I read as well that with ultra-wides you get deeper colours and more details in the sky and clouds just because they're so wide....not sure if that's true or why that would be, but it kind of makes me feel better thinking I can get by without one.

Maybe I'll just stick to getting one for my 18-200mm instead!


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:19 am 
If you plan to get more colour, contrast and detail in the sky, I recommend using ND grads with the 10-20. This I do with the 10-20. Although it was taken with the 18-70mm, if you look under this thread, the 2nd photo of mine used an ND grad and pulled out some fantastic detail with the lighting of the sky.

http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2852


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:45 am 
ChinaMark wrote:
A question for Photoj and anyone else who would like to comment....I noticed you have the Sigma 10-20mm and wondered if you had found a suitable CPL for it? I want to get one, but then read that they're no good for ultra-wide angle lens.


The use of these is rather down to artistic preference. Photoj outlined the effect they produce on wide angle lenses but if you like that effect then why the hell not?

Example.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 10:22 am 
That is a beautiful picture of the London skyline and the sky looks great! Gonna look into ND filters too. Not sure what the terminology is but what no. do you use? Gonna look into the Cokin slot system as well...seems like a god idea if you've got lenses with different thread sizes.

Telexstar, yes, that's very true. It's all art and subjective. Must admit though, I saw one example and maybe it was an extreme example, but I didn't like it. The middle third of the sky was a really deep blue colour and the 2 thirds on either side were just pale blue....looked really odd.

Just noticed the example you linked to! That is nice! That's different because it kind of blends from the paler blue into the darker blue and that works well.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:18 am 
Thanks. With ND grads, I find myself using the ND4 most (reduces light by 2 stops) because this is the most versatile. I also have an ND8 which stops light by 3 stops, which is what I used for the London skyline. The ND4 is a medium so the transition between dark and light is in the midline, and then the ND8 is a soft, which is a progressive graduation all along the filter. The ND4 is the more essential from my experience, but as TelexStar has quite well illustrated, it all comes down to a matter of photography style.

Although Cokin themselves don't make the best ND grads (there is nothing wrong with the Cokin ones, but I would recommend Lee for their quality; however they are many times more expensive), their filter holder has become very popular and other brands make filters to fit into this. The advantage of such a system is two-fold - the thread size as we've touched upon, and with ND grads this is useful as you can alter where the transition line on the filter to line up with the horizon, which you can do with a screw-on.

You will find a listing of the Cokin ND grad filters here:
http://www.geocities.com/COKINFILTERSYSTEM/gradual_gray.htm

And by-the-bye, it seems we've moved away from the theme of blurring water. Should we start a thread for ND grads/NDs?


Last edited by Photoj on Thu Jan 17, 2008 12:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:42 am 
I need to invest in some ND / grad filters. Photoj, Your London skyline image is superb!

Is there any real practical use for the normal ND filters over the ND graduated ones?


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