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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 7:19 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 9:41 am
Posts: 45
Location: Helsinki, Finland
I have no real news about this lens, though I bought one :D

Got to say that this review helped me to make a decision to purchase this lens. I have had it about 5 hours right now and I can't get my hands of from it :lol:

Feels really good and well built lens. Can't wait for next weekend, to have a good test with this one.

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dslr: Nikon D7000 with some glass. Slr: Nikon FE2 with some manual focusing glass.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 9:26 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 12:59 pm
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Location: The Netherlands
You're welcome, and congrats on your purchase :)

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 2:44 am 
So mine arrived in the mail tonight. I've literally just been playing with it for 5 minutes, and it is awesome.

Quick question, I'm pretty sure my copy doesn't have front focussing issues, but how could I tell if it did?

Cheers.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 7:56 am 
If you're enjoying your lens, does it matter if it's front focusing? Keep in mind that practically all lenses front/back focus to a certain degree which is why all modern cameras have AF micro adjustment. It's not unusual to have to adjust your focus on professional L series lenses.

Anyway, the way to determine if there are focusing issues is to do the following (Note: You'll need a tripod and a camera capable of live view):
1) Pick a suitable target. Preferably flat, with good contrasts. Newspaper prints stuck onto the wall is a good example.
2) Line up your with the target. Ensure that your lens is perpendicular (i.e. at 90 degrees) to your target in both horizontal and vertical axis.
3) Make sure you're at a sensible distance from the target. Best to pick a distance you'll normally work at (for this lens I chose 4m). This step is a little tricky as there are others who suggest going for 15x - 20x the focus length. So if you're testing at 70mm, you'll want to make sure you're 10.5m - 14m away from the target. This isn't always practical, and I don't normally shoot objects that far away.
4) Switch on live view and focus on the target. Zoom in to max on live view, this should bring up the point of focus into view. Now turn the focus ring so that it focuses away from you. If the image became sharper, you've got front focus. If you turn the focus ring so that the focus comes towards you and the image becomes sharper, you've got backfocus.

Have fun :)


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 9:50 am 
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Pgtips, our pixel peeper first class :D
(Just kidding pg) ;)

But seriously....if you don't notice your front focusing in real life, don't bother checking it with testing charts. You'll just drive yourself crazy...

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 4:02 pm 
Well, I can't help pixel peeping. However, I do realize that pixel peeping has practically zero real life impact and is just done for fun :). My Sigma 70-200mm front focuses by 3mm. The only time I actually notice it is when shooting newpaper stuck to my wall ...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 4:07 pm 
Thanks, I thought front focussing was a problem, and I didn't even know what it was till now.

But it seems great! Focus is fast as lightning.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 6:38 pm 
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Yeah the focus is blazingly fast :)
The frontfocusing is an issue if you look at your pictures at 100%, otherwise....you're fine. ;)

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 7:16 pm 
Citruspers wrote:
Yeah the focus is blazingly fast :)
The frontfocusing is an issue if you look at your pictures at 100%, otherwise....you're fine. ;)


So fast my 40D doesn't know what to do :evil:


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 10:35 pm 
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podgeorge wrote:
Citruspers wrote:
Yeah the focus is blazingly fast :)
The frontfocusing is an issue if you look at your pictures at 100%, otherwise....you're fine. ;)


So fast my 40D doesn't know what to do :evil:


Please elaborate?

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:56 am 
That sounds strange Ed. Does it end up hunting for focus?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 10:05 am 
It's just because, yesterday i was using it to shoot Rugby, and even though the AF kept up it was inaccurate for a to large percentage of the shots which frustrated me hugely!


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 4:14 pm 
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Yeah the continuous AF is a bit quirky sometimes, but using 3D tracking solves a lot.

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 4:47 pm 
I don't really shoot moving subjects, so I haven't noticed it. However, I did visit a wildlife park and we were in a stand overlooking the wolf enclosure. I managed to track the wolves rather well.

Were you shooting with the centre AF point on continuous AF?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 10:31 pm 
pgtips wrote:
I don't really shoot moving subjects, so I haven't noticed it. However, I did visit a wildlife park and we were in a stand overlooking the wolf enclosure. I managed to track the wolves rather well.

Were you shooting with the centre AF point on continuous AF?


Trust me rugby is very fast when played aggressively, and i was using continuous AF all the time, and mostly just the centre point, because when i tried using all of the points selected, the accuracy was even worse than mine :x , i really do wish i had better AF on my camera (7D pops into mind :roll: )


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