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PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 9:42 pm 
Hello everyone,
I need to make a decision on weather to buy one of these three cameras fairly quickly as i am going to Hong Kong for a couple of days and the prices are cheaper over there.

I really would like having video on the SX1 and i cannon afford any better than an entry-level DSLR. It all really comes down to image quality - if the SX1 has nearly as good quality as the entry-level dslr's then i'll go with that - but if i'll be taking allot better images with a dslr then i'd rather that and buy a seperate video camera later down the track as i don't film that much video.

Thanks for your help,
James


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 10:16 pm 
jamesgower wrote:
Hello everyone,
I need to make a decision on weather to buy one of these three cameras fairly quickly as i am going to Hong Kong for a couple of days and the prices are cheaper over there.

I really would like having video on the SX1 and i cannon afford any better than an entry-level DSLR. It all really comes down to image quality - if the SX1 has nearly as good quality as the entry-level dslr's then i'll go with that - but if i'll be taking allot better images with a dslr then i'd rather that and buy a seperate video camera later down the track as i don't film that much video.

Thanks for your help,
James


In my opinion, dslr will always be better than compatcs (correct me if I'm wrong) and if you want video I think it'll be bbetter to get a video camera coz using video on dslr eats the battery quickly and also the memory...


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 12:23 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 8:27 am
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Location: Hanoi, Vietnam
I've yet to try it for myself, but I've heard that video on DSLRs is yet to be properly implemented in a useful way - no focusing, for example.

If video is important, then i would do one of the following:
1 - get a top quality bridge camera;
2 - a cheap DSLR & cheap video cam/point+shoot
3 - wait for properly functional video to appear on affordable DSLRs

Looks like #3 is our due to time constraints. # 1 is by far your cheapest option.

I suppose it depends on what you want to photograph as to whether to go for # 1 or 2


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 1:33 am 
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Location: Speyer (Germany)
kimchi wrote:
I've yet to try it for myself, but I've heard that video on DSLRs is yet to be properly implemented in a useful way - no focusing, for example.

Manual focus is possible ;)


Quote:
If video is important, then i would do one of the following:
1 - get a top quality bridge camera;

Like the Canon SX-1 IS ;)
Definitely a good camera and zooming is quite a lot of fun. You can zoom while filming + auto focus. The screen is very nice as well (as it's not fixed like those of these DSLR's) and the picture quality is not bad. The EOS 1000D has the better picture quality but only 3x zoom (kit-lens).

The D3000 doesn't have live view - I'd really miss that.

_________________
Canon EOS 500D + Canon EOS 5D Mark III + Canon EOS 33v
Canon EF 28-80mm 3.5-5.6 USM + EF 24-105mm 4L IS USM + EF 100-400mm 4.5-5.6L IS USM + EF 50mm 1.8 II + EF 100mm 2.8L Macro IS USM + Sigma 12-24mm 4.5-5.6 EX DG HSM + Canon Speedlite 580 EX II + Nissin Speedlite Di 466


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 11:42 am 
Thanks for all your suggestions everyone - so this is where i am now...

1) I would not like the AA batteries in the SX1 and would much prefer the Lithium battery in the dslr's

2) And I would really like having video on the SX1

3) And I would like having the huge zoom rather than spending thousands of dollars on new lenses

4) - BUT i still dont have a straight answer on how well this camera performs against the dslr's with stills

5) I am leaning towards a dslr because i want to take my photography further but i dont know with which brand to go with - some people say the Nikon kit lenses are better and that you will have to spend allot of money on a cannon lens to get a good one, but Nikon's customer support is terrible and allot of people complain about the 1000D's annoying menu system...what do you think about this?

6) Here is what camera labs has to say about D300 vs. 1000D...

- Canon’s EOS 1000D / Rebel XS is over a year older than the D3000, but remains Canon’s current entry-level DSLR and hence the main rival for the new budget Nikon. Both the 1000D / XS and D3000 share the same 10 Megapixel resolution, 3fps continuous shooting and the same range from their 18-55mm stabilised kit lenses.

In its favour, the Canon features Live View, a depth-of-field preview facility and comes with free software to remote-control the camera from a PC or Mac, along with a much more sophisticated RAW processing application. In its favour, the D3000 features a slightly more sophisticated 11-point AF system (versus 7-point), a larger 3in screen (versus 2.5in), viewfinder gridlines and a friendlier user interface for beginners.

But for many beginners, the lack of Live View on any new DSLR is a deal-breaker, and crucially as an older model, the Canon has already enjoyed online discounting, making it look competitively priced compared to the D3000 – at least during its first few months on sale anyway.





________________________________________________________



I dont think i need live view but i would really not like having grid lines - however, i really like the idea of controlling the camera with your computer, but i am a beginner so i guess the GUIDE mode would help me.


Can someone explain this RAW stuff - why is it no good on the D3000?

Thanks for all your help,
James


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 12:36 pm 
See inline

jamesgower wrote:
Thanks for all your suggestions everyone - so this is where i am now...

1) I would not like the AA batteries in the SX1 and would much prefer the Lithium battery in the dslr's

You can get high quality rechargable AA batteries for the SX1

2) And I would really like having video on the SX1

You may need to choose between still photography and video, if you are on a budget. Most entry level DSLR's do not have videos. If video AND stills are important, then Panasonic's GH1 maybe an option. I have heard good things about their video and still implementation.

3) And I would like having the huge zoom rather than spending thousands of dollars on new lenses

Huge zooms on DSLR's will indeed cause quite a lot. Again, if you're on a budget, and REQUIRE high amount of zoom, then DSLR is not an option.

4) - BUT i still dont have a straight answer on how well this camera performs against the dslr's with stills

Here's my answer. The image quality on a DSLR will be better than that of a SX1. The difference is mostly determined by the size of the sensor. The bigger sensor on a DSLR will allow for MUCH better low light performance. It will also allow you to control depth of field in a creativity way. See this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/moaan/1203213253/

I don't believe it's possible to achieve the above result with an SX1.



5) I am leaning towards a dslr because i want to take my photography further but i dont know with which brand to go with - some people say the Nikon kit lenses are better and that you will have to spend allot of money on a cannon lens to get a good one, but Nikon's customer support is terrible and allot of people complain about the 1000D's annoying menu system...what do you think about this?

Generally they're all decent cameras, and you should try it out in store. (Luckily?) You're on a budget, so your choice will be limited to 2 or 3 cameras. :P

The Nikon D3000 and Canon 1000D certainly sound like good choices to start with. Pick it up, play with it, and see which one you like better.

I personally have the Canon 1000d, and am happy with it. I like the 1000d menu system fine.


6) Here is what camera labs has to say about D300 vs. 1000D...

- Canon’s EOS 1000D / Rebel XS is over a year older than the D3000, but remains Canon’s current entry-level DSLR and hence the main rival for the new budget Nikon. Both the 1000D / XS and D3000 share the same 10 Megapixel resolution, 3fps continuous shooting and the same range from their 18-55mm stabilised kit lenses.

In its favour, the Canon features Live View, a depth-of-field preview facility and comes with free software to remote-control the camera from a PC or Mac, along with a much more sophisticated RAW processing application. In its favour, the D3000 features a slightly more sophisticated 11-point AF system (versus 7-point), a larger 3in screen (versus 2.5in), viewfinder gridlines and a friendlier user interface for beginners.

But for many beginners, the lack of Live View on any new DSLR is a deal-breaker, and crucially as an older model, the Canon has already enjoyed online discounting, making it look competitively priced compared to the D3000 – at least during its first few months on sale anyway.




________________________________________________________



I dont think i need live view but i would really not like having grid lines - however, i really like the idea of controlling the camera with your computer, but i am a beginner so i guess the GUIDE mode would help me.

In my opinion, most live view systems on DSLR are marketed to the beginner as simple-to-use point&shoot experience. But ultimately, they're useless to newbies in that situation. I only ever use Live View for stationary objects, and manual focus. There are cetainly grid lines available for DSLR viewfinders, but those models maybe out of your budget.

I've heard good things about the live-view system on the Panasonic GH1.

I also like controlling the camera with computer, and that's one of the reason I chose Canon over Nikon as they offer a free program along with the camera.


Can someone explain this RAW stuff - why is it no good on the D3000?


Thanks for all your help,
James



Ultimately, your wants are the following: video, high amount of zoom, low-cost, image quality, next-level-photography.

Looks like your budget is the limiting factor here. I'd recommend that you set a budget, prioritize your wants, and see which wants you can accomplish.

For example, if video and high-zoom is more important than image quality and photography, then your SX1 will be just fine.

If image quality, and creative control of your photography is more important, then an entry-level DSLR will be your choice.

If budget is flexible, and you want video AND good image quality, then take a look at the Panasonic GH1. The "kit-lens" is a 10x zoom. They sell for $1500 USD on amazon.com.

PS: phew that was a long response. But I was in your shoes a few months ago, so I thought I'd offer what I've learnt.



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 8:12 pm 
Thanks for your advice - that really cleared some things up for me...

i'm almost certain on the Canon EOS 1000D

but i'll still try the other's out in-store

thanks again,
James


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 Post subject: Nikon D3000 vs. Canon
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:06 pm 
jamesgower ...

Just saw this Kenrockwell review of the D3000 ... not complementary:

http://kenrockwell.com/nikon/d3000.htm


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 10:18 pm 
robwong1 wrote:
jamesgower ...

Just saw this Kenrockwell review of the D3000 ... not complementary:

http://kenrockwell.com/nikon/d3000.htm


I don't find Ken Rockwell to be a useful source of information to newbies. His views are very polarized, and not fair or balanced at all.

His opinions could still be useful (or entertaining) for someone who are already familiar with photography.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 1:37 am 
p2sam wrote:

I don't find Ken Rockwell to be a useful source of information to newbies. His views are very polarized, and not fair or balanced at all.

His opinions could still be useful (or entertaining) for someone who are already familiar with photography.

I would take his word as reference and do a bit more research on your own.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 2:00 am 
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Posts: 716
jamesgower wrote:
if the SX1 has nearly as good quality as the entry-level dslr's


Under what conditions? i.e. are you going to be taking mostly static shots during broad daylight? (e.g. landscapes) And will you be viewing them primarily on a computer monitor (or TV w/ built-in card reader)? Under those conditions, the SX1 should hold up quite well.

It's when you have to compensate for lower light levels by increasing the ISO (e.g. indoor sports) or when you want to make larger prints that the SX1 will start to fall behind the entry-level DSLRs.

HTH - Mark


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 2:24 pm 
p2sam wrote:
...

I don't find Ken Rockwell to be a useful source of information to newbies. His views are very polarized, and not fair or balanced at all.

His opinions could still be useful (or entertaining) for someone who are already familiar with photography.


+1 -- I stopped keeping up with him quite some time ago -- while some information he gives is interesting, he has a clear biased on many fronts that doesn't provide objectivity. ymmv.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 2:51 pm 
i love my Canon 1000D, great into camera imo.


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