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 Post subject: Manual focus
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2009 2:41 pm 
Could any of the FZ-28 owners give me some info on the manual focus on this camera? I know that it's controlled via the Q menu joystick but it's one feature that never seems to make it into the video reviews.

I'm curious about how quick and easy it is to use and how well it works. Does this camera do bokeh effect well (I realise that it will be limited compared to DSLR due to size of lens etc)? Can you adjust the depth of the focus using the manual focus mode to make more of the background or foreground in a shot become out of focus?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:42 pm 
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Hi MT, I've replied to your similar question in the Canon SX10 IS thread.

It's tricky to achieve a shallow depth of field on non-DSLRs due to their small sensors and small actual focal lengths, and the FZ28 has an additional issue where it likes to select small apertures in auto under bright light.

If you really love the shallow DOF effect, you'll need to get yourself a DSLR, and a lens with a bright focal ratio like a 50mm f1.8 / f1.4.

But yes please, any FZ18 / FZ28 owners, be great to see examples showing the minimum DOF you can achieve on portrait shots...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2009 11:59 pm 
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The manual focus is fairly difficult to use on the FZ28, in my opinion. It's one of the things that frustrates me the most with this particular model. The camera will magnify your subject in the LCD (it won't do so through the viewfinder), and then you push the joystick up or down to get the image in focus.

It's a lengthy process, and can be difficult to see results in certain situations (i.e. low light). The biggest problem with the feature is that there is no meter or indication of focus direction... You really have to fiddle with the joystick to get it going, and you may not realize you're focusing in the wrong direction at first. It's touchy... don't expect to be able to focus in small increments. Overall, if you're patient it's a decent feature to have for things like still life, landscape, or architectural shots, but completely worthless for any living/moving thing, or shots in low lighting conditions.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 2:12 pm 
Gordon Laing wrote:
Hi MT, I've replied to your similar question in the Canon SX10 IS thread.

It's tricky to achieve a shallow depth of field on non-DSLRs due to their small sensors and small actual focal lengths, and the FZ28 has an additional issue where it likes to select small apertures in auto under bright light.

If you really love the shallow DOF effect, you'll need to get yourself a DSLR, and a lens with a bright focal ratio like a 50mm f1.8 / f1.4.

But yes please, any FZ18 / FZ28 owners, be great to see examples showing the minimum DOF you can achieve on portrait shots...


Yeah, I've seen both replies from you Gordon. I appreciate them very much. I posted similiar questions on both the Canon and Panasonic threads because the two main superzooms I was looking into were the SX1 and the FZ28.

I think you are right in that I should probably be looking more into the DSLR area.

Thanks again. Love the site.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 9:31 am 
see below images.
i tried out the manual focus function and surprised to see that I actually captured some bokeh shots.

http://picasaweb.google.com/resca80.fz28/FZ28PicsRel1#5291156254878920194

http://picasaweb.google.com/resca80.fz28/FZ28PicsRel1#5291154599021950882


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 1:04 pm 
Thanks for the response resca80. They're nice bokeh pics.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 6:59 pm 
Hi MT,


I've tried the manual focus on a couple of bridge cameras and they all act simular.
They are all difficult to use because you need to use a button that is on the back of the body.
On a dslr you hold the body with 1 hand (and a bit of the other one), look thru the viewfinder and with the other hand adjust the focus which makes more sense.
Maybe an idea for the makers of camera's would be to put the manual focus buttons on top or on the front of the camera which would make more sense to me.

Here are some picture that I took of my cars

http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/lh/photo/ ... directlink


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 10:33 pm 
Hi MT,

I agree with Luke-san, they are not ideal for manual focusing. If you use a tripod then focusing becomes easier. I have to admit that the camera does a pretty good job of focusing for you especially if you use the spot metering. To reduce the DOF additional lenses can be used to good effect, have a look at the links below, see what you think.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32766848@N06/3212707220/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32766848@N06/3211860783/

BTW the first one is definately not a portrait shot ;>)


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