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 Post subject: taking 4/3 picture
PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:03 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 3:53 pm
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I understand that when you bring a pic taken from 4/3 camera to print on a 3/2 paper (normally 4*6 size) then you have to crop top and bottom or left and right sides of the picture. And it would definitely be that you will lost some parts of the picture.

I just want to know how you guys deal with above situation or do you have any tips for that when you take a pic that later on has to be printed on 4*6 paper size.

Thanks....


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:57 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:08 pm
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Location: Germany
Hi universe_sound! The same problem applies to most of us because not only is the aspect-ratio for print different from the sensor but also the monitor or the TV on which we display the stuff. So cropping or down-sizing everywhere.
The solution? I normally don't take a picture without some room to breath around the major subject, so that cropping later is not a big issue. But when things are terribly tight and I don't want to lose a single pixel of the original, remember that the paper you print on can also be cropped :shock:
So for example print the 4:3 original full-sized and not cropped on the 4x6" paper, than you will have blank paper left&right. Just cut that away (down to 4x5.3") and everything is fine without losing any content!

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2007 10:45 pm 
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Most decent photo printing services also offer paper that matches the shape of 4:3 images - for example 6x4.5in. But the 'gotcha' is that this won't fit into photo albums designed for 6x4in prints!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 1:41 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 3:53 pm
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Right now i'm just looking for my first DSLR and, thus, trying to take every aspect of each camera into account.

It is quite hard to determine between great features-valuable and great processor-quality that lies on a standard market like Nikon or even Canon

I know that in the end, as suggested, i still have to go to try all of them by myself but just can not get away from comsuming information as much as possible first.

So, thank you very much for information and idea~!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:20 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2007 12:48 am
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Location: Arizona
Using standard print widths here in the US 8x10, 16x20 (4:5) the 4/3 format results in smaller crops. It is about 16% for 4:3 vs. 20% for APSC and 35mm full frame(36mm x 24mm). That is one of my beefs with the digital manufactures. A more fitting format could be used but I suspect that slr manufactures are leveraging their APS and 35mm mechanical designs into their digital products. If memory serves me the 35mm format came about as way to make a small camera that used 35mm cinema film which was being mass produced, so the mechanics of the cameras were designed to fit the available film. With the advent of digital sensors the manufactures are under no such restraint ..i.e. no film period, but tend to re-use rather than re-engineer their camera body mechanical designs. There is no technical reason that a 4:5 sensor could not be designed that would be compatible with the current 35mm and APS lenses. That would allow enlargements to a perfect 8x10, 16x20 etc.

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