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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 6:32 am 
It's best to think of ebay not as a shop but more as a market place. You don't have a Basket and you don't browse around, adding items, before heading to the checkout. Instead, you search for what you want and ebay will return a list of results of people selling the item that you've searched for. Your exchange is with that seller, not with ebay. Ebay is just the medium to allow you (the buyer) and the seller to make an exchange.

However, If the two items you are wanting to buy are being sold by the same seller then sometimes the seller will offer to combine the postage for 2 or more items that you buy from him/her.


Other sellers (the ones that are a bit more serious) actually have online stores set up which are little private areas where they can list a whole range of stuff that they sell. You still don't have a 'shopping basket' and each purchase is handled on a per item basis but again the seller may offer to combine the postage for multiple items that you buy.

The best bet is to ask the seller a question (it's one of the links on the right hand side when you've clicked on a particular item) to see if they offer this.

The other thing with ebay is that it's completely built on a trust system. As with all good systems built around trust, there are people out there that like to abuse it and want to rip you off for all that you're worth. This is where the feedback system comes in. Generally speaking I like to avoid anyone who has lower than a 98% feedback rating. The more feedback they have and the higher the rating then the better the seller.

There's always a risk you take, especially if you're parting with large amounts of cash and unfortunately the power is completely with the sellers. But if you can find a good seller then there are definitely legitimate bargains to be had.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 7:54 am 
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Thanks for that Telexstar. I had assumed it was just like making any other purchase on the web. I'll send the seller an email to see if p&p can be combined. Since it's in HK it would be a good thing.

Thanks again,
Zorro.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:30 pm 
For what it's worth, what I do when buying multiple items from HK is to first buy one of the items and then send a message to enquire about discounted P+P rates indicating what other items I want to buy with the paypal message. The sellers have then knocked the discount off the other items.

Response time is generally good, although you have to remember that they're 8 hours ahead so you may have to wait for them to open.

Unfortunately the discounts offered on multiple p+P often aren't that great though..but better than nothing.

Hope your ebay experience goes well, as TS says, if the feedback is good then you should be safe.

BTW, if you don't see exactly what you want, then it's worth messaging the shop. I got my B+W filters this way, even though they weren't listed...I get the impression these outfits have tons of gear in stock and only list a small amount of it(?)

Let us know how you get on with the Tokina, a super wide is on my shopping list too...when I can afford it.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 6:20 pm 
Hello all,

I was wondering if it's right to keep the polarising filter always on the camera. In fact i want to know what such a filter actually does.
I was said to buy one for lens protection and for better fotos.

I found in a local buyer the following filter:

http://www.hama.de/portal/articleId*372 ... *72%2C0+mm

I need it for my nikon 18-200 VR.
Any opinions-reviews on the specific product

P.S. What's the difference between polarising filter and uv filter?
http://www.hama.de/portal/articleId*367 ... *72%2C0+mm

The above polarising filter is also a uv filter

Thnks


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 6:41 pm 
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The UV-filter is practically "invisible". it just protects your lens from dirt/water.
The pol-filter takes -2EV light away, so it's a bad idea to keep it always on! Furthermore the effect depends on the angle that the filter is turned to the horizon. So you can inadvertantly screw the pic if you don't watch out!
The pol-filter cuts away certain reflections, so water becomes transparent and blue sky reflections on leaves are killed which gives the leaves their more natural green.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 7:05 pm 
So what's the point to have a polarizing filter, and not to adjust the camera to -2EV? :idea:

Anyway i think for everyday use, the only one that i'll need is a uv filter to have it always on. Correct me if I got a wrong idea.

Thanks tom...


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 7:29 pm 
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A polarizing filter can make the sky more "contrasty" too. The white clouds tend to stand out even more against the blue sky. When used sparingly they can be a great addition.

UV filters don't just protect the lens. They also cut down haze in landscapes and panoramas.

Zorro.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 8:49 pm 
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I think, Constantinou, you're right.
Buy the UV-filter and live happily ever after :wink:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:57 am 
Constantinou wrote:
Anyway i think for everyday use, the only one that i'll need is a uv filter to have it always on. Correct me if I got a wrong idea.


Yep, buy a UV filter. By comparison to Polar filters, they're cheap and you can leave them on all the time. A decent polarising filter for your 18-200mm VR can set you back anything from £50-£130 depending on where you're buying from.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:08 pm 
Thanks a lot guys for the advice.

I found a lot of infos in Wikipedia too about polarizing and uv filters. Great database though!

I'll see what kind of uv filters are out in my local market and i'll post a couple of them to tell me your opinion.

Thanks again


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:27 pm 
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Good quality and ok price: Hoya (super) HMC (pro1).
See here for the different coating-qualities of Hoya-filters: http://www.thkphoto.com/products/hoya/coatings.html
Watch out that the front and back-side of the filter is multi-coated to avoid IQ-degradation!

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:22 pm 
What about nikon filters? you didn't mention nikon at all...

Nikon also has clear filter, just for protection. which one do u suggest? is it wise to leave uv filter allways on for everyday use?

Hoya pro1 looks good though, and at a reasonable price.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:31 pm 
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Any filter will add to the challange of each lens to keep ghosting and flare at bay, as it adds another glass/air border that can reflect light.
So if you can keep your lens clean without a UV-filter, just do it.
But as replacing a scratched filter is much cheaper than replacing the front lens, many people just use an UV-filter for protection.
The most important thing than is to have a filter that is high-quality multicoated on the front and the back!!!
Nikon certainly makes good filters, but I cannot imagine them being cheaper than Hoya filters - so go for the Hoya.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:56 pm 
My two Hoya UV filters where the ones that caused me lenses the reflect :) (As seen in topic below)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:03 pm 
Lightspead Answer thanks a lot tom!!! :shock:

I'll see what's in the market...


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