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 Post subject: Nikon D40 Quality Help
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 3:39 am 
I have a Nikon D40 and i went to Torrance,CA, for a Vetarans day parrade and i took some cool shots, on the camera screen it looks so high quality, but on the computer it looks like crap. look

http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/29 ... 5728imbcxm

can you guys help please.
one more question, i want my pics to be real high quality for a D40, what is a good res. Raw Fine Norm Basic Raw+B?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 5:48 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
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Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Kriss, I think that's a great shot! Presumably you were using your 70-300mm?

For the best JPEG quality, always shoot in Fine mode. RAW mode can give you a little bit extra, but you need to convert them on your PC or Mac later and I don't know if you're up for that.

So for now, choose Fine from the Image Quality menu and L from the Image size menu to make sure you're also using the full resolution of your camera.

Those slightly fuzzy marks you can see on your image though are from dust - and I'm afraid that's one of the worst examples I've seen! To get rid of them you'll need to buy a blower brush and follow this workshop we published earlier: http://www.cameralabs.com/workshops/dslr_dust/

Fortunately it's quite easy to reotuch dust marks from your images using software on your computer, so if you have any shots you're really pleased with, you can 'clean' them by hand.

I'd also say your photo looks like it was taken with a high sensitivity ISO setting - maybe 800 ISO. If the light was low, then this is fine, but if it was bright, then you may have been able to use a smaller ISO number to get a smoother result - like 400 or 200 ISO. But for fast action, you may have to accept using higher ISOs to get a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the motion.

I still think it's a great shot though!

Gordon


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 1:17 pm 
I already cleaned out the dust spots, the ones to the right, and i already have the dust blower.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 5:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:08 pm
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Location: Germany
Uh oh, that really does not look good. My diagnosis would be the same as Gordon's: dust plus too high ISO. It almost looked like you cropped it down to 1 Mega-pixel :cry:
Did you apply any post-processing on your computer?

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Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 10:41 pm 
What is post-processong,check out the recent pics i took with my 18-55.

http://www.patricksaviation.com/uploads ... /13935.jpg
an F-15C landing at Nellis.

and here is a C-130 with Teeth landing at Nellis.

http://www.patricksaviation.com/uploads ... /13933.jpg

One more question, what ISO number do i put it on at a day time like that?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 4:15 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Kriss, once again, those are great photos!

They must have been pretty low for you to take those shots with an 18-55mm... did you have to duck?!

The recommended ISO setting depends on how much light there is and how fast a shutter speed you need. The lower ISO numbers give the best quality, but they need more light. If your lens aperture is already wide open, then more light means a slower shutter speed, which means you might see some camera shake or blurring with fast action.

If I'm shooting action, I'll normally start with 400 ISO and see how the photos are coming out. If they look sharp and there's loads of light, I'll see if I can get away with a slower ISO (ie 200 or 100) for better quality. If these look blurred, I'll put it back to 400 ISO.

If the photos are coming out blurred at 400 ISO when you zoom-in on the images in playback then I'll increase the ISO to, say, 800 and see how I get on. If its getting dim, or the action is really quick, you might need 1600 ISO to avoid any blurring.

It's a case of experimenting and judging your photos as you take them.

Let us know the ISO, shutter speed and f-number for those photos and we can comment further - but they certainly look really good to me. You still have one faint dust mark near the top, about halfway across the frame though...

PS - Post processing just means adjusting the image using software on your computer afterwards...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 11:50 am 
oh ok cool, thank you, no i didnt have to duck they were just real low.


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