Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Sun Sep 21, 2014 10:53 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 5:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:33 pm
Posts: 443
Location: St. John's, NL, Canada
I was flicking through the photos of my trip to PEI and came across a couple disappointments. I was taking HDR's of some windmills. In doing so I wanted some with a long exposure to get some motion blur so I used an ND8 filter. I took the shots in aperture priority mode from -2ev to +2ev in 1ev intervals. I've done this type of shot before with the exact same gear and filter and didn't have a problem.

I didn't bother to check the images so I just packed up the tripod. Anyway, the photos came out really super dark. I'm not sure what happened. Below is a photo of the +2 ev bracket. The meta data for this shot is:

I know it's a lost cause a this point, but I really would like to know what might have happened to prevent it in the future.

ISO 100
EV bias, +2
f/22
ss 0.8s
program: aperture priority
Metering mode: pattern

Camera:
Nikon D200
Lens:
Tamron 17-50mm, f/2.8

Image

_________________
----------------
Trevor Harris

Nikon D200
SB-600
YN-560 II
YN RF 603 x 4
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8
Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8
Nikon AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 5:29 pm 
That is weird. Tbh though I havent used the D200 enough to know how its meter reacts in different conditions.

But if you're saying youve taken similar shots before and were fine, I guess it is just a freak thing.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 7:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2008 6:32 am
Posts: 512
There could be numerous reasons for the meter to react like that. The question is whether the camera is to blame. What I like is that you did not chimp through the images you took. That's how a true hearted photographer works.

What could have gone wrong?
Lens not perfectly mounted
Minimum shutter speed set in camera
The meter's limit is around 16 EV if I remember correctly. Maybe the ND8 had its effects?
Or is the meter defect?

Personally I use ND filters quite intensively and prefer manual mode along with spot metering (exposed for the whites). It is quite difficult for us to tell what went wrong. Maybe you could give us a link to the full EXIF data?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 8:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 1:16 am
Posts: 237
I would guess it's most likely the filter messing with the metering system. You're probably better off taking a test shot without the filter to get a correct exposure. Then add the filter, go into manual mode, and do the calculations needed for the appropriate exposure.

_________________
Body: Canon Rebel XS, Canon EOS 7D
Lenses: Sigma 17-70mm f2.8-4.0 OS HSM DC Macro, Canon EF-S 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS II, Canon EF 50mm f1.8 II, Canon EF-S 10-22mm f3.5-4.5 USM, Canon EF 85mm f1.8 II USM


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 8:08 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:33 pm
Posts: 443
Location: St. John's, NL, Canada
I appreciate the compliment, I think, but I don't understand it. What does "chip through" mean?

I stopped by the side of the road to take this shot and a few others. So the camera was off, then on to take these (underexposed). Switched it off, and then an hour or so later back on again and those were fine. Since then I've taken hundreds of photos and they're all ok.

For your what could have gone wrong list:
1) Possibly, but not likely. It was thrown in the car before and after this so I guess it is possible that it knocked off and then knocked on again. I didn't switch lenses at all during this day, however.

3) When using flash, it's set to 1/60. But without flash there isn't any. All photos in the full 5 brackets are underexposed. This happened for the 4 HDR's I took during this period totalling in 20 consistently underexposed photos.

4) Never heard of this "meter limit". Could you explain? The aperture is open to 2.8 during the meter process isn't it?

5) Doubtful since hundreds of photos taken after this came out fine.

_________________
----------------
Trevor Harris

Nikon D200
SB-600
YN-560 II
YN RF 603 x 4
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8
Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8
Nikon AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 8:45 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2008 6:32 am
Posts: 512
Trevor Harris wrote:
What does "chimp through" mean?

Chimping explained: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimping

Trevor Harris wrote:
Could you explain "meter limit"?

I should have been more precise. Every meter has a measuring range. Which basically means it requires a certain amount of light for it to work. On the other hand, in your case it must have received too much light, since it underexposed.

Are you sure you had the camera set to aperture priority or did not accidentally hit the AE-Lock button? The Exposure compensation was set to +2 EV?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 7:01 pm
Posts: 1227
Location: NW England
Is it posible that the camera had been set to -EV for a previous shot & not re-set?
(Thus meaning all the BKT'ed shots for the pic, were all under what you were expecting)

_________________
Image btw,He who dies with the most toys, WINS!
Nikon D800E & D700 bodies + Nikon 200-400mm F4 VR1, 50mm F1.4G, 16-35mm f/4G VR, 105 F2.8 VR macro, 70-300mm lenses. A couple of filters, Giotto tripod & ballhead. Lowepro Slingshot 302 AW
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:33 pm
Posts: 443
Location: St. John's, NL, Canada
@theorigamist: I'm not sure that the filter is messing with the metering system since I've used it before in a similar situation and it worked fine then. However, what you suggest would definitely work.

@Bernie: My exif data says it was indeed in aperture priority. Not sure about hitting the AE-Lock button, but on my D200 the AE-Lock button only holds the exposure as you press it and then recalculates as you release. I had the HDR's set up on a timer as to avoid camera shake so I definitely wasn't holding the button during the shots. The Exposure compensation was set to +2 EV for this shot, is that what your asking? Or are you asking something slimier to oldCarlos in that the compensation was dialled in on top of the bracketing. so if I was at -3 (for example) before the bracketing then the shots would have been -5, -4, -3, -2, -1.

@oldCarlos: See previous note.

_________________
----------------
Trevor Harris

Nikon D200
SB-600
YN-560 II
YN RF 603 x 4
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8
Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8
Nikon AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group