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PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 12:56 pm 
Tokina is only better if you dont have the monday morning piece of crap with back and front focus problems, not to mention the CA problems.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:28 pm 
yes,the CA is the biggest flaw in the tokina


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 5:10 pm 
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That's one of my biggest gripes about buying third-party (I advocate to stick to Nikon), although the prices are lower you're sometimes trading off quality, you never know when the AF motor will fail on you or something will stop working. When you stick to Nikon, Canon or whatever brand the lens is made for, you can generally assure that the lens won't fail on you (although there still is that slight chance).
If you do go third party, I'd recommend getting some sort of extended warranty.

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Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 6:02 pm 
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The real question here is: How wide do you need to go for "landscape" photography? When in doubt, get a 10-20/24mm zoom and you don't have to worry. I had a Sigma 10-20mm for some time after giving the first copy back because it was so decentered (you can find my review of both copies through my signature).
In the meantime I'm no longer convinced that you really need focal lengths below 16mm (=24mm equivalent) as you really, really loose so much detail in e.g. trees/leaves/grass that I'd rather do handheld stitching of two or three 16mm shots than go 10mm on a DX-body.
As to the various lenses on offer: Just make damn sure that you can give a third-party lens back after testing, because my experience with different wide-angle third-party zoom was awful. It might have to do with the extreme tight tolerances you need in the sub 16mm area*, because the dof on the sensor-side is incredible shallow at these focal lengths!
----
*and the high pixel-density of the D7000

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 7:32 pm 
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@#$ the Tokina - go the whole hog and go for the 14-24mm f2.8.

Just don't call it a landscape lens! If your idea of a widealnge is for landscapes, you may be sorely disappointed!


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2011 4:53 am 
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There really isn't a focal length that you have to have - it all depends on your style.

For landscapes - and I'm not good th them - I find myself reasonably happy with the focal range of my 16-85. I seem to use most of the range - wide to feel "in the scenery" and longer to isolate subjects of interest.

But I also remember being happy with a film camera and 40mm lens (just a bit wider than "standard" - about 26mm in DX terms. If a subject didn't suit the lens I just didn't take the photo. At the time I also had a zoom (28-210) and that seemed to give me only 10% more subject matter on a trip to Europe.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2011 1:54 pm 
I had a olympus c4000 camera when i was in venice 5 years ago.
It had 32mm for he widest angle. it was oke but wider would have been nice.

Was forced to buy another camera because there was no memory cards for it on sale anyware anymore. Went with a Canon G9. Nice pictures if it works but 60% of the time pics were out of focus for some reason i still dont know what is causing it.

Now I went with a nikkon D7000. All great pics all the time except at the beginning when i used to slow shutterspeeds on my 70-300mm but thats was not the cameras fault of course.

I think i gonna try stiching foto technique for a while with my 35mm because i dont make many landscape photos anyway and then 700 euro is a lot of money for something you dont use that often (of course it can be used for other things as well) but you only can spend money once and i also would like a nice nikkor macro lens which I probably will use a whole lot more.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2011 2:02 pm 
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You could have a search through the types of photo you like or intend to take on Flickr and look at the EXIF data to see which lenses and settings were used to take the shots.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2011 5:42 pm 
On flickr they never put any exif data there in the comments. How can I get the exif data from the file itself if it is online and i dont want to download it (or sometime i am not able to download it)?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 8:14 am 
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Look under the ACTIONS menu, you should see view all sizes, view slideshow and view Exif info, not all shots have the info but quite a few do

This shot (selected at random) does...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/momentocre ... 852389697/
and here is the exif page...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/momentocre ... otostream/

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http://keystrokesukimages.com


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 9:35 am 
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Nikkor 16-35mm or as landscape and walk around lens Nikkor 14-24mm with Lee Filters set SW150.

That's what I went for.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 1:21 pm 
They are both a bit expensive. Why is wide angle so expensive anyway?
Cant buy anything below 500 euro.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 2:49 pm 
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@nikonfreak You get what you pay for. If you compare the shots of the 14-24 and 16-35mm with a cheap Tamron lens I'm sure you'd see some differences.

Even the quality improvement from the 35 F1.8 to the 16-35 or the 14-24 is visible. I personally will stick to Nikon as I know that their lenses are very well build and deliver a very good performance. Can't comment on Sigma, Tamron or Tokina but I'm sure that their portfolio of lenses will have one or two lenses that will suit your current situation. And if you want good pictures I would recommend to save and don't go for cheap and cheerful. You might be buying twice.

I would also check if Tamron etc. use some sort of nano crystal coating. I shot directly into the sun with the lenses and there was a tiny wee bit of flare. Especially if you shoot landscapes it's things like that that will make the difference to your photos.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 3:00 pm 
Yes I prefer nikkor glass myself too.
So you are saying those 1000+ euro nikkor zoom lenses wil perform better then a Nikkor 35mm prime lens?

I have seen 24-70mm lens photos from dubaiphil that looked really impressive. But it is a lot of money for a lens.

Maybe if i am rich i will buy something like that. What I dont like about Nikon that there lens namings dont really indicate if it is a professional lens or a consumer lens. With Canon they Call it an "L" lens. with nikon i dont have a clue how to see the difference (looking at the lens name i mean).

I dont think I have ever seen lens flare on my nikkor lenses. I use solar cap on all the time maybe that helped or maybe its the ED glass.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:53 pm 
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So you are saying those 1000+ euro nikkor zoom lenses wil perform better then a Nikkor 35mm prime lens?
I wouldn't say that.
The DX 35/1.8G is a very capable performer of which I'm sure no zoom could touch it qualitywise, but: 35mm is too long for landscaping imho.
As I'd indicated before 16mm (up to 24mm) is a good focal length for landscape on DX.

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