Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Fri Aug 22, 2014 6:15 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2011 10:00 am 
I went DSLR 2 years ago from point and shoot. I got the D60 kit which included the 18-55 and 55-200 VR lenses. I went for an entry level DSLR camera which was not too complex and which would allow me to grow a little in understanding and technique.

I have overwhelmingly used the D60 in auto mode or in a pre-set mode such as portrait, sport etc. I have experimented with the MASP modes, generally with very variable results.

The big let down about the D60 is the 3 point focus ring. It struggles especially in low light/indoor conditions. I also would ideally like not to have to swap the lenses around at times, and I don't think I will ever become the type of enthusiast who lugs a bag of lenses around.

So, after research, I am thinking of the 18-200 VRII lens to solve the 2 lens problem. All reviews I have seen say it is a great all-rounder multi-purpose lens. If anyone disagrees, please speak up. (By the way, I am planning on selling the D60 and 2 lenses.)

That leaves the decision over the body. I am not limited by budget (within reason), so I can go up to a D7000. I am not necessarily fixated on Nikon, but all the research I did 2 years ago said there was little to choose between Canon and Nikon, but Nikon has the better lenses, so I went with Nikon.

As I see it, my choice is the D3100, D5100 and D7000 in ascending order of price, complexity and features. I am not all bothered about video capabilities on any of the cameras, as I have a HD video.

Having looked at the specs and reviews for all 3 cameras, this is my take - the D3100 is closest to the D60 and has more focus points, the D5100 would be an upgrade but is still relatively user-friendly, and the D7000 takes things almost into semi-pro territory.

The D7000 gives the most learning room, but at my current level of knowledge (using mainly the auto and pre-set modes) I wonder whether it would be like buying a Ferrari and then driving it around in 1st gear. Just how user-friendly is the D7000 - can a fairly basic user pick it up and use it on auto until he builds up knowledge and sophistication? I really don't like the D3100 and D5100 swivel screens but recognize they are the cameras aimed at the more basic user.

When it comes to computers, conventional wisdom is buy the best spec you can afford so you future-proof yourself as best you can. Is it the same on cameras?

So, what advice can everyone give to help me out? I recognize this is a Nikon forum, but if someone wants to suggest another brand, please do so. Thanks for your collective help.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2011 10:35 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 4:42 pm
Posts: 1388
Location: The Netherlands
If budget allows, even with cameras you can go buy the best you can afford, because even the pro bodies feature "auto" modes (named Program, the P on the dial). I would indeed put the 18-200 on there if you really dont like changing lenses and dont mind giving up on image quality over 2 lens combinations (considering you dont stick to the 18-55/55-200 combo which has similar performance). I would say in features the D7000 is more future/learning curve proof.

PS, isnt a ferrari capable of driving 100km/h in first gear?

_________________
- Wout -
Lowepro Nova 200 AW filled with Nikon D90 + MB-D80
18-70 DX, 70-300 VR, 35 1.8 DX, SB-700


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2011 11:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:33 pm
Posts: 443
Location: St. John's, NL, Canada
I agree with Wout. Generally speaking, the higher end cameras are just as easy to use as lower ones. They do have added features and capabilities, but this generally does not make them harder to use. I'd get the best you can for your budjet as to better your future self.

This might be out of the scope of this thread, but might I ask why troubles you were having in using the manual modes on your camea?

p.s. Welcome to the forum.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Follow up
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 11:34 am 
Thanks guys for your input. It has clarified things for me. I live in the Middle East so getting your hands on certain cameras in the stores in not always easy. I got a chance to handle the D7000 just this morning and it felt mighty nice!

Trevor, in answer to your question about why I am struggling on manual modes, it is nothing more complicated than I haven't actually sat down and taken the time to learn all the stuff I need to understand to help me take better shots. 99% of the time I am with my wife with the camera, and she has about a 6 second patience limit, so I have never had much of a chance to really spend a few hours just figuring it all out and taking shot after shot until I get it right. I am making photography my main hobby and my wife either will need to learn patience or alternatively I will just get out there on my own. I also met a relative of a friend recently who is an enthusiast, so I reckon I can learn a lot from him. I am also taking the time out to read online tutorials on this great site and others.

A linked but slightly off topic questions - a bag for the D7000 and 18-200 lens. I have a Lowepro Slingshot 100AW, but the lens wont fit in it. I am thinking Lowepro Toploader. I want to travel light so don't plan to carry anything else except a SB 400 flash and maybe a Gorillapod SLR Zoom tripod. For that would I need the Toploader 55, 65 or 75?

Thanks


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:25 pm 
Go to the Lowepro website, they must have an online selector or at least a filter so you can chose the perfect bag for your needs


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Lowepro site
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 4:54 pm 
Already did that, and it is far from clear (to me at least!) exactly which model I need. Just wondered if anyone could advise from real life experience.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 4:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 4:42 pm
Posts: 1388
Location: The Netherlands
you could compare the size of the 100AW slingshot to the toploaders? The slingshot was too small, then you know what size not to take.

_________________
- Wout -
Lowepro Nova 200 AW filled with Nikon D90 + MB-D80
18-70 DX, 70-300 VR, 35 1.8 DX, SB-700


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 4:57 pm 
Doh. Revisited Lowepro site and found a completely different page which laid it out - need the 75.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 08, 2011 6:16 am 
If you have not yet bought your new camera you may want to take a look at the Nikon D300s. It is built like a tank (pro-spec) and offers excellent image quality, assuming you have decent lenses on it of course. You may find it about the same price as the D7000 or a little more expensive. It does have a video mode but it is not great quality and you do not have to use it, the stills however are terrific once you get to grips with it.
Another option is to look for a good used D300 which is basically the same camera without the video mode and only uses one memory card instead of 2 in the D300s.


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group