Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Mon Nov 24, 2014 9:23 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:51 pm 
Hi everyone, I just got my new/used Nikon D50 and a new 70-300mm VR lens. I’m enjoying them a lot, but I have a few things I need help with.

First, I get a purple tint to many of my pictures at times.

Image

I know that Sony sensors do this a little, but this is heavy enough I suspect I have a bad camera. What do you think?

Next, I am disappointed with the 70-300mm lens. I don’t seem to get much clarity at any range. I’ve tried shooting with a tripod so I don’t confuse camera shake with focus problems, but nothing seems to help much. Here is the very sharpest shot so far (I was able to get sharper pictures with my old P&S).

Image

This (above) was taken 40-50 ft. from the subject at around 165mm. I always use spot focus which was on the middle brown goose.

This (below) was taken at 300mm around the same distance.

Image

Despite my problems, I’m having a lot of fun with this camera/lens. The Vibration Reduction works fairly well, and is better in normal mode for me than active mode. I really like the big bright viewfinder. It had been billed as small, but I can manual focus with ease, when I want. For sure, the D50 is old tech, but it has enough features to meet my needs. Also, the 300mm reach of the lens (450mm equiv.) is a hoot – just right for casual nature stuff. Thanks for comments and suggestions. I’m worried the lens and/or the camera could be defective or marginal. Please comment.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:58 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Brian, how do you mean, lack of clarity?

If you're comparing your 70-300 to a point and shoot, you'll notice the former has a MUCH smaller depth of field. So if you have three ducks behind each other and focus on the middle one, the ones in front and behind will probably be out of focus. And while VR will reduce camera shake, it won't stop a duck moving, so, you'll still need quick shutter speeds.

As for a purple tint, maybe there was a white balance issue. Maybe try shooting in daylight or cloudy WB, or in RAW so you can try different white balances later...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:05 pm 
I've always been able to get some part of the photo to be in good clarity, but with the 70-300 I can't get anything really good.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:07 pm 
The brown duck was the focus subject but it just isn't very sharp! nothing in the shot is sharp


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:11 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Again, when you have a telephoto lens on a DSLR, you have to be very precise with your focusing. So unless there's back focus issue, I suspect the lens wasn't 100% focused on the subject. And that perhaps a slower shutter also allowed some motion blur.

Can you tell us what the aperture and shutter speed were for that shot?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:14 pm 
f8 at iso 400 Also, the shot was make on a tripod using a remote with VR off.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:15 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
What shutter speed?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:17 pm 
Oh yes, sorry: 1/60


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:28 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Sorry, one more Q - what focal length was the lens?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:29 pm 
165mm


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 10:23 pm
Posts: 2341
Thats why!

A good rule to have is keep your shutter speed faster than your focal length (not perfect but a good rule to have if your not using VR).

e.g. 200mm - use 1/200

Obviously if there is things in the scene moving faster, up the shutter speed, and open the aperture and up the ISO to compensate.

_________________
Canon EOS 5DmkII + BG-E6 + Canon EOS 40D + BG-E2N + Canon EOS 33
Canon 17-40 F/4L USM + Canon 24-70 F/2.8L USM + Canon 28mm F/1.8 USM + Canon 70-200 F/2.8L USM IS + Canon 85mm F/1.8 USM
Canon Speedlite 580EX II + Canon Speedlite 540EZ + 2 x Nikon SB-80DX
Cactus V2s Wireless Trigger - 5 x Cactus V2s Wireless Reciever

MY FLICKR!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:37 pm 
I understand the rule, but I spent an entire morning, about 500 shots, trying a wide variety of settings and those two pictures are the best I could get.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:37 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
OK, so at 165mm, presuming you've not taken the cropped sensor factor into consideration, you're effectively working at a focal length of almost 250mm on your D50.

Without stabilisation at that focal length, you'd need a shutter speed at least 1/250 to eliminate camera shake or at least 1/30 with a 3-stop stabiliser.

Your shutter of 1/60 is getting close to this limit, so I'd advise a faster shutter to completely eliminate camera shake. But that's for a stationary subject.

Since you're photographing wildlife which are in almost constant motion, you'd really want a much faster speed still - maybe 1/250 as a minimum to avoid motion blur.

This will need more light, so if you leave the ISO at, say, 400, then the camera will need to open the aperture, thereby reducing your depth of field and making your focusing even more critical. If you want f8 or greater under the same light with a faster shutter speed, you'll need to increase the ISO and accept a reduction in quality.

It's all about compromises!

I'd say when using this lens, especially for wildlife, try to use much faster shutter speeds, and just practice with the focus. You will need to be much more careful than with a P&S which inherently have a much greater depth fo field.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:43 pm 
Ok Gordon, I understand what you're saying. I took several shots at ISO 800 (nothing higher) and at 200, and mostly went for 0 EV at the aperture setting I was using (usually f8 ). There was little direct sunlight, which certainly makes a difference, but I expected better. I like the lens and don't want to give up on it, so if you think it's working properly, I'll try again when there's better light. Thanks

P.S. What about all that purple? Is that normal?


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:40 am
Posts: 1330
Location: Scotland
The purple toning is almost certainly a WB issue. Try setting it to "Cloudy" and see how that looks. I use that setting pretty much all the time.

Zorro.

_________________
http://zorrofox4.deviantart.com/

Image

Various lenses, SB800 & Manfrotto 190 with 460MG head


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group