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PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2014 3:44 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 10:16 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Republic of Ireland
Hi guys, I've been asked to take the photos at a friends wedding in September & am a bit nervous as I really want to do it right. I need advice, I have a D5100 with just the kit lens I need advice on general photography for the big day, do & don'ts etc. I also would like to know if it would help to invest in some filters & which ones to enhance my photos. Any other advice would be great, I'm sure there is loads of experienced photographers who have a wealth of information. thanks


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 10:15 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
Posts: 1822
I think answers you receive will depend on the answer to the following:

Have you been asked to take photos?
Have you been asked to be the photographer?


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 10:57 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 10:16 pm
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Location: Republic of Ireland
I have been asked to be the photographer

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 12:32 pm 
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Well I'd volunteer my services as a second/third shooter to as many local photographers as possible between now and then, if I were you.

And not worry about filters too much - you won't have time to be using them.

I'd recommend, as an absolute start:

To hire a 2nd camera body - for two reasons. So that if something goes wrong with your camera you have a back up and so that you can have a different lens immediately available for a different FoV. As you only have a kit lens, you'll have to be hiring a lens too - I'd probably go for a faster zoom lens in the 24-70 or 70-200 f2.8 range

To have at least one speedlight - preferably two (so if something goes wrong with one you have another spare). There may be times when you cannot use a speedlight and have to run with available light only (maybe the church and ceremony) so you may also need a faster lens to help you out. Be 110% comfortable with using a flash and getting consistent results. This will save time during the day and time in post production.

To have multiple memory cards in case you lose your files.

To go on some available light courses to manage your images during the formal shots and times when you cannot use flash.

To go on some speedlight courses to learn the use of bounce flash (when you're using one flash) and lighting set ups if you're able to set up more than one flash to control light.

Have a crib sheet of formal shots required and shots not to be missed - work these out in advance with the bride and groom, sort out orders for the formal shots so not too many people are hanging around etc should help

Maybe to get some remote triggers for those flashes, if you have them.

And that's the very tip of the iceberg, so filters are the very least of your worries. If you can get yourself to any social functions to practice event photography with bounce flash (shooting manually for consistency) through local clubs/societies/contacts with local press shooters as a second photographer etc, that may help.

So I don't want to put you off (!) but there's a big step up from having a camera at a wedding to being a wedding photographer. You'll have to manage your friends' expectations, understand what style of photography they like (do they like black and white reportage? Will your current kit enable this? Do they like selective colour (if so, shoot them now ;) ) black and white images, what are they expecting from you?)


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 1:27 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2006 10:41 pm
Posts: 366
Dubaiphil's advice is spot on.

And get so familiar with your camera that you can get to any setting you want very quickly.

The second body suggestion is spot on too.

A 50mm f1.8G lens would give you good portrait capability for not too much money, particularly when (and if) the bride and groom have a portrait set between the wedding and reception. Yes - you will need lenses that are low light kings as much of the shoot may very well be in poor light.

And a "trial" shoot with the bride and groom is an excellent idea too (managing expectations and giving you useful feedback on preferences).

Think of having an assistant to keep track of equipment (and you!!)

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