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 Post subject: What is ¨NOISE¨?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 3:11 am 
Hello,

I am new to digital and have been reading comments about ¨Noise¨. I have a new Panasonic TZ5 (Got it after reading the review here) however I have no clue what ¨Noise¨ is or how it affects the photos.

As a side note, the biggest I would ever have anything printed would be an 8x10, and 99.9% of my photos will end up stored in my computer or printed in 5x7.

Obviously I am not a PRO, I don´t know an F stop from a short stop :? . I have never used a camera on anything other than the ¨Automatic¨ setting however I am trying to learn and understand the new digital formats and how the cameras work.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 4:35 am 
Noise is the equivalent of grain, from the film days.

To confuse you even more, there is more than one type of noise that can be found in an image.

I recommend checking out this article just so you can get a basic idea of what noise is and how it is caused.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 6:22 am 
THANKS Sdrummer, good article. I am starting to see / understand how the old 35mm film format terms are being used in Digital.

Now if I understand F-Stops correctly, I want to use the LOWEST ISO possible, like 100, however the lower the ISO, the more light I will need. Is that right ?

All I can remember about 35mm film is that 100 was very good for still subjects and 400 or higher was better for moving objects and bright light (sunlight), I think :?

With my old 35mm canon camera, I always got 400 speed film and set the camera on automatic :roll:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 10:51 pm 
BAQ wrote:
THANKS Sdrummer, good article. I am starting to see / understand how the old 35mm film format terms are being used in Digital.

Now if I understand F-Stops correctly, I want to use the LOWEST ISO possible, like 100, however the lower the ISO, the more light I will need. Is that right ?

All I can remember about 35mm film is that 100 was very good for still subjects and 400 or higher was better for moving objects and bright light (sunlight), I think :?

With my old 35mm canon camera, I always got 400 speed film and set the camera on automatic :roll:


Yes you are correct. With lower ISO's, the sensor is less sensitive to the ambient light, which requires more light to be entered through the lens. And a larger aperture (f-stop), like f/2.8 as apposed to f/8, will let more light enter the lens.

Increase your ISO when you can't hand-hold an image and get a sharp result, or when there isn't enough ambient light for you to get a usable exposure.


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