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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 6:25 pm 
hey guys, i recently bought a canon 450d with the kit 18-55mm Is Len. My friend's parents asked me if i could help them develop a menu for their restaurant.

I'm new to this hobby, so i was just wondering about the lighting i need, the settings i will need to use to get good results. I am on a budget and will not be able to purchase any new lenses. So any advice for me with my current kit would help. Thanks!


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2008 12:57 am 
bump.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2008 1:09 am 
Hey there.

Alright well, here's something about shooting food.

Their are many ways to do it.

You could have a studio set-up with some softboxes and monolights, or you could use a Light Tent.

Tents are a great method on taking commercial/tabletop photography, and you can find some great deals on eBay.

One of the most important aspects of food photography is presentation of the food.

From the background, to the actual food itself. It's very important that everything looks good.

In the technical aspect of the photography, you need to light everything well.

So if you need to do food photography, then here is what I recommend.

Try and get a tent, some lamps or if the tent comes with lights than that's great. Familiarize yourself with the food photography that is being taken by commercial photographers. Look at the saturation of the colors in the food. Look at the foods presentation. For example, think to yourself, "Why is that hamburger positioned like that?" etc'...

Examine food photographs and learn the presentation of the food.

Also, in food photography, depth of field is sometimes very important.

You see the main food in focus, and in the back, other foods barely visible and blurred do to your depth of field.

You might not need a tent, as long as you have a solid place to work, and you can compose everything nicely, with good overall lighting.

Best,
-Sean.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2008 3:26 am 
thanks sean for your advice...

I am also puzzled by which mode i should shoot in?
should i shoot it in one of the auto modes? (such as the flower symbol, to get a close up feel and detailed picture) or should i do something manual?
Any other advice would be appreciated Thanks.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2008 3:53 am 
To keep it safe, I recommend shooting in P.

If you want to shoot in macro/close up mode (flower) you can. But those are designed more on the understanding that the photographer will want to focus closely to an object.

But shooting in P wouldn't be too bad.

Also, you could shoot in Aperture priority mode, (A/Av mode).

When you go into that mode, put the aperture to the lowest number it can go. (i.e. 2.8, 3.5, 4, 5.6).

By putting a small aperture, you get a shallow depth of field, which will blur anything behind or in front of the subject focused on.


KEY: USE A TRIPOD!!!!!!!!!


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