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 Post subject: Disney's Electric Parade
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 3:06 am 
Any suggestions on what setting I should use to shoot the Disney's Electric Parade? I have a Canon 40D kit. :?:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:00 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi JZ Alba, welcome to the Cameralabs forums!

For the uninitiated here - including me! - tell us more about the conditions and content of the parade. Is it at night? Does it move quickly? Where will you be in relation to it, distance-wise?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:23 am 
the event is at night. It is the light parade of disney's characters. It is a slow moving parade. The problem is that if I use flash, the magic of the night light parade is gone. I want to capture the very nice lights of it without any noise. By the way, distance would be 10-20 feet away.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 9:02 am 
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Weeeell, if you're eliminating the flash, both for effect and distance, then your only option is to either increase your ISO sensitivity (with the result of higher noise) and or use a lens with a bright aperture - ie small f-number.

A great investment for any Canon owner is a 50mm lens - they do three and the f1.4 in the middle is a great choice. It'll gather 16 times more light than a kit lens at f5.6, so allows you to shoot in low light without increasing your ISO too much. That said, you may still need to increase it a bit, say to 400 ISO.

See Canon's 50mm range.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 10:45 am 
Thanks for the advise. I will start searching for a better lens as you mentioned. :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 11:41 am 
You'll also find that a monopod will help.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 10:41 pm 
Photoj wrote:
You'll also find that a monopod will help.

thanks. I have a tripod so I will bring it as well.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 10:47 pm 
The tripod will help if you find yourself a good viewpoint and plan to stay there. However if you plan to move about, the added mobility that a monopod gives you is insurmountable.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 2:19 am 
Photoj wrote:
The tripod will help if you find yourself a good viewpoint and plan to stay there. However if you plan to move about, the added mobility that a monopod gives you is insurmountable.

Thanks, I'll search for a resonable price monopod.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 3:46 am 
what is your kit lens? do they have IS ? I also recommend 85mm f1/8 it is good for 15-20 ft range and good for close up too.

try to use iso 800 or below, and also use spot metering. point the AF to the
object of interest (face etc) to get accurate metering.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 8:14 am 
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Posts: 7972
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J.Z. Alba wrote:
search for a resonable price monopod
You will be pleasantly surprised that even a Manfrotto monopod has a very nice price. that is unless you want a head on it. But for my purposes I just screw the camera directly on the single "leg", shoot only in landscape orientation and tilt back and forth to get the right angle. Might not fit your photographic task though...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 8:37 am 
Enche Zein wrote:
what is your kit lens? do they have IS ? I also recommend 85mm f1/8 it is good for 15-20 ft range and good for close up too.

try to use iso 800 or below, and also use spot metering. point the AF to the
object of interest (face etc) to get accurate metering.


I have the canon 28-135mm IS f3.5-5.6. thanks for the advise.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 8:39 am 
Thomas wrote:
J.Z. Alba wrote:
search for a resonable price monopod
You will be pleasantly surprised that even a Manfrotto monopod has a very nice price. that is unless you want a head on it. But for my purposes I just screw the camera directly on the single "leg", shoot only in landscape orientation and tilt back and forth to get the right angle. Might not fit your photographic task though...

I will be in one spot only. Doesn't monopod also require to be steady when taking longer shutter speed? Monopod is great for daylight photography but nighttime is kinda hard especially on longer exposures. (I think)..... :?:


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