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 Post subject: motorcycle photos? help
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2013 6:09 pm
Posts: 57
Hi people, ive been asked by a good friend to photo his newly restored motorbike (rd400) bike is higly polished and has many chrome parts.

Any advise on how to best picture it ?
Outside? In good day light with sun behind camera? What settings you recommend.

This isnt what I normally photo..... never shot a bike picture before.. need to get it right photo could be displayed in garages ect...

Thanks

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:14 am 
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Location: Gold Coast Australia
It’s always difficult to recommend settings as we all have different preferences. I would suggest seeing what the camera decides on P mode and use that as a base line, perhaps try using some + & – EV until you get the shot you want and use less focus points.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:36 am 
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If done tastefully, and HDR would really make a nice photo. Try not to let the background distract, either.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 12:38 pm 
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like already said, pay attention to the background. Try and find a suitable spot, also look for undesirable reflections on the bike. Depending on light flash could be useful, try it with and without.
Get down low and try a few different angles, also close in on some of the fancy bits with large and small dof. Take lots , just experiment, some will work better than others.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 6:29 pm 
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Location: Boca Raton, FL, USA
With a lot of chromework, or any vivid paint colors, I find a low-key photography style works really well with classic cars and bikes. Try to put the car or bike a long distance from any background, and preferably with a dark colored background - shaded hedges under a tree line, a dark wall, an unlit parking garage, etc. This will let the background be mostly blacked out or highly out of focus and dull - the light should be decent on the vehicle - either in nice sunlight, or with a flash. Meter off the highlights on the car from where the light hits it, which forces an underexposed shot. This will add more drama to the vehicle and mostly eliminate any distracting background. You can punch up saturation and highlights a bit in post processing. This works really well also when doing closeup shots and detail shots of parts of the bike, where the low-key style, black backgrounds, and dramatic highlights and saturation, can make a really cool poster-like effect. Here are two classic cars where I did grill closeups using a low-key style, with saturation and highlights punched up in post processing for more drama and a posterized effect:
Image

Image

I think this style would work very well with a bike too, especially one with lots of chromework.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 11:57 pm 
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Location: Gold Coast Australia
Zack, I’m not into this sort of shooting but your response is very informative, I liked it.


Cheers

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 5:02 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 12, 2011 9:46 pm
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Location: Switzerland
I think to really make a good Picture of a bike you need to feel a bikes soul. If you can ride it, maybe take it for a spin. There are always great views a bike looks good infront. I myself ride a Triumph Daytona 675 and have made many photos of it infront of a Lake, snowy mountains, nice strong green gras fields with a green tree hill. I noticed the best shot i got were at sunset. With the sun up high i had trouble getting the bike and the background in the right light (one being to bright the other too dark). Unless it's HDR like mentioned above. Maybe you could also get your friend to ride some corners and get a few shots at that too. I think the typical photoshoot room is a bit a shame for a bike like that. If you do decide to take the bike outside infront of a nice view, take some cleaner with you. You're bound to have some dead flies on it. Don't rub the paint too rough, let the cleaner do it's stuff. Good Luck

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